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View Poll Results: Is this a valid idea (no matter how strange) ?

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Thread: A strange, noisy idea

  1. #1 A strange, noisy idea 
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    Recently I've been thinking about a bit of a strange weapon. It emits a wide spectrum of sound and picks up the echoes. The part of the frequency which dosen't reflect is the frequency the target resinates at. This frequency is then fires in a focused beam at a high volume. This should cause a target like bone, china, stone or glass to shatter or warp. If this is is load of rubbish please forgive me, its just an idea.


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  3. #2  
    Time Lord
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    I'm not sure it would work exactly like that, but yeah: If you can determine the resonant frequency of something, and then emit that frequency for an extended time, you can totally shake something apart.

    The trouble is determining it. Just because a frequency isn't reflecting doesn't mean it's being absorbed either. Really low frequencies can pass right through objects without exactly reflecting back toward you.


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  4. #3  
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    there is a weapon which focuses a beam of sound the way light is focused through a spotlight. It's emited at very high decibels as a deterant but can kill and i would imagine cause deafness. Don't think it would crack bone or stone but most types of glasses wouldn't last too long im sure

    Long Rang Acoustic Device
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LRAD

    heres a demonstration form Future Weapons
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myWxw...eature=related

    It been used in Georgia
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_EUU0...eature=related

    not sure if this is exactly the same thing your thinking of but the principle is the same
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  5. #4  
    Time Lord
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    I also heard some cruise ships were equipped with something like that, which they could use to deter pirates around the Afrikan coast.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax
    I also heard some cruise ships were equipped with something like that, which they could use to deter pirates around the Afrikan coast.
    Damn samolians!! :-D

    Lots of different vessels use them including japenese whalers, US navy and i heard they were deployed in Iraq also
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  7. #6  
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    sounds like tesla's resonance generator.

    fessable i suppose, it's the same thing that happens to crystal wine galsses. but highly impractical implication. the frequencies are extreamly high, lots of power, lots of expensive equipment. ect, ect,...
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  8. #7  
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    The way I understand the principle is that, if you nail the resonant frequency dead on, for a given material, then it only takes a very small amount of energy (emitted over a long enough time) to shake the object apart.

    The big example that often gets cited is this bridge they built up near Tacoma, Washington that shook itself apart just from the force of the wind blowing on it, because the way it was built caused it to resonate with the frequency of the wind blowing on it.

    Trouble is, this is only true if you're exactly dead on. If you're off slightly, then it takes exponentially more energy, the further you are off of exact. So, unless you can at least get close to the right frequency, it would take too much energy to be practical, and then, even if you can measure it, it might still take a lot of energy, depending on how accurate your measurements are.
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  9. #8  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
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    I once saw a movie where a guy goes back in time to another dimension where they have a weapon that issues a frequency high enough to significantly heat up all that is within range. They always hid out in ceramic igloos to escape it. :?
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    I once saw a movie where a guy goes back in time to another dimension where they have a weapon that issues a frequency high enough to significantly heat up all that is within range. They always hid out in ceramic igloos to escape it. :?
    Of course it was ceramic igloos! I mean what else would it be?

    That has to be the most random thing ive heard all day
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  11. #10 weapon 
    Forum Freshman Haku_Midori_Shadowsong's Avatar
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    You seem somewhat confused.

    But overall it would work to some degree.
    -Haku Midori Shadowsong
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  12. #11  
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    well i think that it would be useful in a lab for something or another, but in a military environment there would be too much interference to measure the resonant frequency accurately enough that it would shake something to the ground without a huge amount of energy.

    it's a great idea, something with the abilities of the second part was already on futureweapons. i think you'd be better off if you just had some set frequencies of ceratin common object's resonance. if you had the resonant frequency of the different types of steel you could split tank armor with the thing, switch it to that of whatever type of stone the people of the middle-east use to build houses and you can turn a village to rubble, not very nice, but deffinately useful.

    my only concern is the ability to measure the resonant frequency of odd objects in a combat environment, i wish it could work, the wartime videos of exploding ak-47s would be hilarious :-D
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  13. #12  
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    I doubt tank armor even has a resonant frequency...it's made of layers of several types of materials.

    More vulnerable might be stuff like the glass in the optics and other components of their sensors etc. Of course the volumes requirement might deafen the crew anyhow.
    --
    On a different idea, there is some neat research on modeling sounds to identify firing location of a sniper's shots and similar applications.
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