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Thread: Wind turbine manufacturing.

  1. #1 Wind turbine manufacturing. 
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    The Danish firm Vestas has opened a wind turbine manufacturing plant in Colorado, creating 600 new jobs. Transportation of the very large blades has been a major hindrance to the development of wind power. Now there’s a manufacturing plant in the windiest state in the nation, which makes a great deal of sense.

    http://www.greeleytrib.com/article/2...NEWS/652491943

    This is a wind farm in south east Colorado with a Standard Person for scale reference. This one used GE turbines. Road trailers could carry two of these blades, which was unfortunate since three are needed for a 1 MW turbine, so GE is developing a blade design that would be equally efficient and be small enough that three could fit on a trailer.





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    Forum Masters Degree bit4bit's Avatar
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    Wow thats pretty cool. In the article, it said they will be able to produce 1,800 turbines per year which is pretty good. Those Danish are really the world leaders for wind turbine production...probably cause of all the wind! Do you ever watch 'Super structures' or 'Extreme Engineering' on the discovery channel? They had something on there about them. It's amazing what goes into designing and optimizing the things. I still reckon by late 2000's We'll have 400MW fusion reactors dotted all around, and we won't have to ugly our landscapes with fields of these puny 1MW beasts.


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    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    we won't have to ugly our landscapes with fields of these puny 1MW beasts.
    I agree they don't belong on a clifftop in Cornwall, but in the middle of a 1000 acre field 10 miles from the nearest town they look quite beautiful. The cows still graze underneath them, and the operators have been watching for possible bird kills and haven't found any increased numbers.
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    Forum Masters Degree bit4bit's Avatar
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    Yeh, I suppose they are quite suitable in some places. But those places would have to be out of sight of peoples homes, as there will probably always be a difference in opinion between people as to whether they're attractive or not. Personally, I don't like the look of them much, and would rather replace 400 of them with a single underground fusion reactor, and leave the landscape as nature intended. Obviously we haven't got that luxury right now though, and in terms of engineering, they are very innovative, and interesting solutions to the energy crisis.
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    It is ironic, that so much of modern anything has taken so long to reach the rural and yet alternative electrical power has reversed the trend.

    Was involved somewhat, in California's efforts to go wind power, in the 80's. Both Tehachapi and the Palm Springs projects. Have often wondered where/when the 'not in my back yard' mentality came in, since so many well off folks live/lived in both these areas and home values have not dropped.

    Don't know about Nuclear Power in the US. I would like to see it, but the simple cost to get anything approved has made it far to costly. Then the by product storage is a problem.

    Hydro-thermal energy is another alternative source, which gets little attention, outside California and Nevada. Cost/efficient as anything going and as clean as nuclear...
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