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Thread: A material that absorb heat

  1. #1 A material that absorb heat 
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    I would like to find a material that can absorb heat from a bottle of water.
    And basically make the water chill around 3-4 degrees from the room temperature.
    I know water has a very high specific heat capacity so lots of energy needed to be absored to increase its temperature by 1 degree celcius.
    I just wanna make a bottle and surrounded by this type of materil or liquid that absorb heat from the content of the bottle( let say the content has in genral the same specific heat capacity as water), and make the content chill and ready to serve.
    This is for my Ideas challenge, if you guys have any ideas or know any chemicals that have this physical properties
    Please tell me. I would be more than delight.
    Cheers


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  3. #2  
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    Unfortunately there isnt one. (research thermal transfer entropy)
    Only if you placed something that was already a few degrees lower around the bottle would it work, OR if you placed some chemicals around the bottle that was undergoing an endothermic reaction; such as refridgerants.


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  4. #3  
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    you could create a water bath. emerge your water bottle in the water bath. add baking soda to the water in the water bath.

    baking soda + water is weakly endothermic and would take some of its energy from the water bottle.

    I'm not sure what quantities you need to cool it to the required information. Trial and error is probably the easiest way =)
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  5. #4  
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    What about suspending a cloth bag in a metal container. Then you could have a knob integrated into the bottom that when turned, retracts a piston that creates a vacuum of some degree. Then the water can evaporate and so chill the water inside the cloth bag. You might even add a dehumidifying agent in the bottom that you could empty now and then. It might be a tad heavy :wink: If weight is not a big concern, you could think of a way of miniaturizing a cooling unit, like a miniature, battery powered fridge. You could even cover the outside in solar panels as an extra source of electricity. Just a brain fart
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  6. #5  
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    leohopkins is right. You're not going to find a material that can magically create heat transfer. A simple energy balance will show you that you'd have to put either some sort of work into the system or a heat generation process (such as a chemically endothermic reaction as suggested).
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  7. #6  
    Forum Senior miomaz's Avatar
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    I don't think that I am mistaken: all materials absorb heat if the temerature is lower than the material next to it.
    (I was playing with the idea of fixing the molecules and atoms in a substance, though magnets, but then again a portable mini refrigerator would be less costly)
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  8. #7 Re: A material that absorb heat 
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    Quote Originally Posted by ylw06
    I would like to find a material that can absorb heat from a bottle of water.
    And basically make the water chill around 3-4 degrees from the room temperature.
    I know water has a very high specific heat capacity so lots of energy needed to be absored to increase its temperature by 1 degree celcius.
    I just wanna make a bottle and surrounded by this type of materil or liquid that absorb heat from the content of the bottle( let say the content has in genral the same specific heat capacity as water), and make the content chill and ready to serve.
    This is for my Ideas challenge, if you guys have any ideas or know any chemicals that have this physical properties
    Please tell me. I would be more than delight.
    Cheers
    Place your 16 oz. water bottle, in a damp cotton sox. Or pour the water into a 16 oz. Aluminum drinking container and see what happens.

    Cheers!
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