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Thread: Titanium coated?

  1. #1 Titanium coated? 
    Forum Freshman A rose by any other name's Avatar
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    Hi guys I am new here anyway I was in two minds as to where to post this. My question is there any benfit to goods that are coated in titanium such as razor blades, drill bits and so on or is it just good marketing? Also for Razor blades for example that are coated in Titanium would they even have enough titanium to provide any benfit over none coated blades? Also is there any test you can do to find out how much Titanium there is if at all?


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    Yes, titanium provides strength. As for drill bits- I've tested it extensively.

    As for razor blades, the same test applies, really- Use regular razors and use Titanium. For me, the better razors last longer, average blade lasts about a month... I have no idea how to test how much titanium is used, though.


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    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    We don't coat drill bits with titanium.
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    Forum Freshman A rose by any other name's Avatar
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    Thanks for the answer so even with small amounts of titanium they provide a benfit over none coated. I was thinking the amount of titanium on the blades might of been to small to give a real benfit over none coated.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    We don't coat drill bits with titanium.
    Titanium Drill Bits - For Increased Drill Life
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    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Excuse me. I allowed my expertise to blind me to a larger world.

    The words "drill bit" to me mean only drill bits used in the oil and gas industry. These achieve their wear resitance through the application of tungsten carbide hardfacing on steel, tungsten carbide inserts, or polycrystaline diamond compacts. Titanium is not used in thse drill bits and as far as I know never has been.

    I keep forgetting that things smaller than the planet also have holes drilled in them. (That reminds me that a dental appoitnment is due.)
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    Forum Freshman A rose by any other name's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    Excuse me. I allowed my expertise to blind me to a larger world.

    The words "drill bit" to me mean only drill bits used in the oil and gas industry. These achieve their wear resitance through the application of tungsten carbide hardfacing on steel, tungsten carbide inserts, or polycrystaline diamond compacts. Titanium is not used in thse drill bits and as far as I know never has been.

    I keep forgetting that things smaller than the planet also have holes drilled in them. (That reminds me that a dental appoitnment is due.)
    Well on a smaller size do you think a benfit could be given to something as small as a razor blade or is there just to little amount of Titanium?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    That's Titanium Nitride on Drill Bits, not Titanium Metal. I have several objects made of titanium metal, and they scratch quite easily, they aren't as hard as Titanium Nitride.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    Excuse me. I allowed my expertise to blind me to a larger world.
    I so gotta steal that from you and use it some day...

    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    The words "drill bit" to me mean only drill bits used in the oil and gas industry. These achieve their wear resitance through the application of tungsten carbide hardfacing on steel, tungsten carbide inserts, or polycrystaline diamond compacts. Titanium is not used in thse drill bits and as far as I know never has been.

    I keep forgetting that things smaller than the planet also have holes drilled in them. (That reminds me that a dental appoitnment is due.)
    All the drilling I do is little holes in little pieces of metal. Sometimes plastic- not so often.
    When I say "little," it's a relative measure.
    Quote Originally Posted by Phlogistician View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    That's Titanium Nitride on Drill Bits, not Titanium Metal. I have several objects made of titanium metal, and they scratch quite easily, they aren't as hard as Titanium Nitride.
    It applies to the O.P. as the O.P. is asking about the marketing of these products. The advertising is not going to give a full chemistry lesson in it's message.
    So, when the ad says, "Oh look at our nifty product, we used titanium to make it," it's honest and accurate enough, but to a chemist, well, then it is not so accurate because the devil is in the details.

    The O.P. is asking about specifically marketed products- is it a gimmick or is it accurate?
    The question was not a hypothetical one about pure titanium products.
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    Quote Originally Posted by A rose by any other name View Post
    Well on a smaller size do you think a benfit could be given to something as small as a razor blade or is there just to little amount of Titanium?
    Size isn't too big a deal, as long as you're well above the molecular level. A hardened razor blade will perform better than a soft metal razor blade in principle; as long as you're using it for the purpose it was made for.
    Now, if you buy heavy duty razor blades hoping to shave sheep, they won't perform any better than a regular razor would.

    A padlock might be a good example. These are marketed as "Case Hardened" and such. Some are made from chrome vanadium and others from steel/tungstun. The marketing is accurate when it says the lock is harder and more durable than an iron or steel lock is. It's perfectly accurate.
    But will it do you any good? Most thieves cut the metal hasp around the lock- since it's much easier to cut.
    It's a bit like putting a steel door on a house with paper walls.
    But the steel door will still be strong even if it doesn't actually do you a whole lot of good.

    Like those movies: You'll see the bad guy lock his victim in a room in his house, right? He'll have like fifty latches and locks on the bedroom door and make a big show of locking them all as the victim whimpers.
    But all you gotta do is wait for ol' baddie to leave. I can punch a hole through sheetrock easy. I mean, really- wait til he's gone, knock out the sheetrock between the studs on the wall next to the door, slide out between the studs (Won't work well for a three hundred pound guy that can't squeeze through a 14 inch space easy- but even then, studs aren't too hard to kick out) and hello freedom.
    Dumb movie directors.

    I would still say that a hardened razor or drill bit will perform better for it's designed purpose. Again, I use hardened drill bits for making holes in metal and the difference between a hardened bit and an un-hardened one is phenomenal.
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    Forum Freshman A rose by any other name's Avatar
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    Thanks for the help i worked out what i wanted to know and all there is to do now is to test a number of Titanium coated products.
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    Be sure to report your findings here
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    The O.P. is asking about specifically marketed products- is it a gimmick or is it accurate?
    Hard to say exactly when it comes to razors, although I would presume it's more likely to be a ceramic compound containing Ti, and the rest is marketing. We don't say our China Tea Cups are made from Aluminium, because the basis for that ceramic is Al.
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    Quote Originally Posted by A rose by any other name View Post
    Thanks for the help i worked out what i wanted to know and all there is to do now is to test a number of Titanium coated products.
    The problem here is that 'titanium coated' products often have multiple layers of coating, the final one being a layer of PTFE (Teflon) or a ceramic compound. If metallic Ti is used, it's effectively case hardening of the edge, and the surface of blade is treated to reduce friction. Making valid comparisons when the marketing blurb only specifies 'Titanium' is going to be difficult, you could really do with knowing how the things are manufactured.
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Titanium is used in a wide range of products from jet engine parts to dental implants. One of it's properties that makes it useful for personal products (razor blades, wedding rings, implants etc.) is that titanium does not cause allergic reactions in people who are sensitive to other metals.



    Hip joint socket.
    This is the other half of an artificial hip joint you can see under cobalt, the socket into which the ball from that part fits into. The outer surface is a wonderful matrix of sintered titanium balls (very small), for the hip bone to grow into, firmly attaching the socket to the bone.
    Source: Paul Wellin
    Contributor: Paul Wellin
    Acquired: 14 June, 2002
    Text Updated: 16 March, 2009

    Pictures, stories, and facts about the element Titanium in the Periodic Table
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    The outer surface is a wonderful matrix of sintered titanium balls (very small), for the hip bone to grow into, firmly attaching the socket to the bone.
    The received wisdom is that bone bonds well to Titanium Oxide, which is probably why my friend still has two screws in his leg, as they are part of it now.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phlogistician View Post
    The received wisdom is that bone bonds well to Titanium Oxide, which is probably why my friend still has two screws in his leg, as they are part of it now.
    This was something I never knew... Fascinating.
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    My experience is that quality brand TiNitride drill bits work as advertised -cheap ones do not. Sharpening takes them back to underlying metal; the coating and advantage is lost. I like cobalt alloy - Superior to hss before and after sharpening.
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  20. #19  
    Forum Freshman A rose by any other name's Avatar
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    with other products Ifeel there is sort of a Placebo effect with it.
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    A Rose - there's no doubt that it does get used for no more reason than to give a marketing edge - if razors lived up to their advertised hype a single stroke would leave my face smooth and stubble free. They don't despite decades of 'smoother closer' claims. But these coatings do get used successfully on genuine tools to good effect.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fabos View Post
    A Rose - there's no doubt that it does get used for no more reason than to give a marketing edge - if razors lived up to their advertised hype a single stroke would leave my face smooth and stubble free. They don't despite decades of 'smoother closer' claims. But these coatings do get used successfully on genuine tools to good effect.
    Well, the razors today are a heck of a lot better than they used to be, so something is working. The old Gillette blue blades were good for maybe one shave, if that. (Really dating myself here)
    Neverfly likes this.
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    Yes, Harold, you did. That was classic.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fabos View Post
    A Rose - there's no doubt that it does get used for no more reason than to give a marketing edge - if razors lived up to their advertised hype a single stroke would leave my face smooth and stubble free. They don't despite decades of 'smoother closer' claims. But these coatings do get used successfully on genuine tools to good effect.
    I dunno about this... The razors I use these days do just that and last about a month. Of course... this may be due to thin hair for me... I can't grow a beard for the life of me and I've been keeping a shaved or at least buzzed head for years.
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    I remember a time when my dad used a straight razor. That must have been a pain, because the razor had to be stropped daily with a razor strap he kept hanging next to the medicine cabinet. The razor strap served a dual function of threatening the kids with a beating if we got out of line. I don't remember actually getting beaten with the razor strap though.

    Then came the safety razor, which I suppose was better, but not by much. These were improved by stainless steel blades, which held an edge a little longer since they didn't rust. No, I don't want to go back to those kinds of razors.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fabos View Post
    My experience is that quality brand TiNitride drill bits work as advertised -cheap ones do not. Sharpening takes them back to underlying metal; the coating and advantage is lost. I like cobalt alloy - Superior to hss before and after sharpening.
    The cutting face of a drill is the helical flute, not the conical tip. The chip tears away from the metal being drilled slightly ahead of the cutting edge, leaving the tip the lighter duty of burnishing the torn surface. Therefore, sharpening the tip gives fresh TiN for hardness and lubrication.
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