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Thread: Buoyancy Engine large scale energy idea

  1. #1 Buoyancy Engine large scale energy idea 
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    Hi Folks,

    I'd be interested in any observations or expressions of interest for this renewable energy idea.

    Scaled Model 2000m WMM - YouTube

    Best regards,

    Will


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  3. #2  
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    Vid has lots of what seems like extra information, but no entirely clear what's the power phase or how it's generating power? Where is the turbine? It is working only as the buoyancy potential energy is released and the car rises? How does it base load?


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Vid has lots of what seems like extra information, but no entirely clear what's the power phase or how it's generating power? Where is the turbine? It is working only as the buoyancy potential energy is released and the car rises? How does it base load?
    Hi Lynx_Fox,

    1. The turbine is location at the centre of the Storage Vessel (SV) and is shown later in the Scaled animation and also in Part 2, System Schematic:

    Buoyancy Engine - YouTube

    2. The generation phase can take place once the SV has descended to the desired depth (in this case 2km). When the sluice valves are opened water is allowed to flow into the SV. As the water rushes into the SV it passes through a water turbine. As the water drives the turbine, this drives a generator and electricity is produced. Think of it as a mobile dam, a quick web search of 'hydropower' will show the principles of the power generation.

    3. Some energy can be generated as the SV returns to the surface but for this particular arrangement this is only likely to serve as a way to improve the overall system efficiency.

    Best regards,

    Will
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  5. #4  
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    Ok the vid confused me because it appears the SV was filling with water at one point in vid 2 about 30 second mark. It probably needs to show water clearly passing through the SV and driving the turbine. And I'd move the SV power generation concept to the very beginning of vid 1, since it's the most important piece. Then get to the details of how to ratchet the SV down to 2km using the buoy oscillations etc. How long does it take the SV to rise? How would to base load over a few days? If you redid vid, I'd find a better and more dynamic speaker (he's boring...sorry if its you) and weave the story into a more interesting story type presentation with a hook of some kind to keep people awake and willing to wait through the most technical explanation. Lastly the wave sound is too harsh and hard to tell from white noise at first--add seagull sounds or something for additional clues.

    Don't get me wrong, I mean to be constructive and like the concept.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Ok the vid confused me because it appears the SV was filling with water at one point in vid 2 about 30 second mark. It probably needs to show water clearly passing through the SV and driving the turbine. And I'd move the SV power generation concept to the very beginning of vid 1, since it's the most important piece. Then get to the details of how to ratchet the SV down to 2km using the buoy oscillations etc. How long does it take the SV to rise? How would to base load over a few days? If you redid vid, I'd find a better and more dynamic speaker (he's boring...sorry if its you) and weave the story into a more interesting story type presentation with a hook of some kind to keep people awake and willing to wait through the most technical explanation. Lastly the wave sound is too harsh and hard to tell from white noise at first--add seagull sounds or something for additional clues.

    Don't get me wrong, I mean to be constructive and like the concept.
    Hi Lynx_Fox,

    1. I Feel that the combination of audio, Schematic and Scaled animations do show the principles but accept that it would take most folk several plays all the way through to take it in fully.

    2. The ratchet pulley system is shown in the Schematic animation and the principle is the same as the Scaled animation but it is accepted that the tidal arrangement shown in the Schematic animation has several differences from the wave arrangement shown in the Scaled animation. There were a lot of new points that I wanted to cover in the Scaled animation and whilst it would have been useful to reinforce the principles by repeating them, I chose not to in order to keep it as short as possible. In hindsight it would have been better to repeat that aspect so the animation is more stand alone. If your comment is about presentation guidance then I hope this acknowldges your points. However, if you're still unsure of this element of the operation let me know and I'll run through it step by step here.

    3. The times for each phase of the operation cycle are stated in the Scaled animation audio. However, to answer your question I've indicated ca. 1hr for the SV ascent.

    4. The generation outputs are also stated in the Scaled animation audio. However, to answer your question I've indicated a range of ca. 1hr @ 300MW to 1/2hr @ 600MW, 5 times per day per Buoyancy Engine. (9) Buoyancy Engines are shown in the array, this enables the power provider to play a number of tunes to suit demand requirements.

    5. Agreed, my voice is a bit monotone in the Schematic animation which is why my daughter kindly narrated the Scaled animation. It would be worthwhile to spend more time refining the presentation but I'm keen to press on because there's so much more to do. Once the idea is developed I would revisit the presentation or perhaps get a specialist in to make a more professional presentation.

    Many thanks,

    Will
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  7. #6  
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    I liked the ability to submerge the entire rig for storms. As I'm sure you're already aware of, several other attempts to develop wave power were destroyed by storms.

    Do you see major maintenance headaches from the large immersed pulley systems? Perhaps it's no worse than locks.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    I liked the ability to submerge the entire rig for storms. As I'm sure you're already aware of, several other attempts to develop wave power were destroyed by storms.

    Do you see major maintenance headaches from the large immersed pulley systems? Perhaps it's no worse than locks.
    Hi Lynx_Fox,

    1. I wasn't aware of other designs being destroyed by storms but having researched oil rig design and wave data this informs the Statement of Requirements that the system will need to work.

    2. Proper attention to through life considerations will be vital to continued system operations. I expect the Pontoon Pulleys will be most susceptible to marine fouling and maintenance requirement as they will operate in turbulent, oxygenated salt water within the sun-light zone. The parts at depth will be far less affected but even so will need periodic inspection and maintenance. Here are a few of the considerations:

    a. As indicated, each pulley wheel and drive drum has hydraulic clamping jaws which allow remote attach / detachment. This procedure will be shown in the Construction / Assembly animation which is the next one within this series.

    b. Allowance will be made to carry spare components such that they can be swapped out when overhaul is required.

    c. This can be done by crane from the ocean surface and the part returned to land for overhaul.

    d. The turbine / generator assembly and marine filter screen located on the SV will also be equipped with remote quick release.

    e. Redundancy of key components will be established through a Failure Mode Effect Analysis but is likely to be no less than n+1.

    f. Controls will detect component malfunction and a failsafe mode would initiate in the effect of a major failure.

    g. Inspection will be achieved using remote controlled submersibles.

    Best regards,

    Will
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  9. #8  
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    Here's one dramatic example of a wave power plant destroyed by a storm:
    Ocean wave plant destroyed by winter storm - YouTube

    And another, more recent project that didn't end so well:
    Massive Offshore Waves Sink Australia's Oceanlinx Wavepower Pilot - CleanTechnica
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Here's one dramatic example of a wave power plant destroyed by a storm:
    Ocean wave plant destroyed by winter storm - YouTube

    And another, more recent project that didn't end so well:
    Massive Offshore Waves Sink Australia's Oceanlinx Wavepower Pilot - CleanTechnica
    Hi Lynx_Fox,

    Thanks for that, designing a system for the open sea is certainly an engineering challenge and respect must be taken for its power and unpredictability.

    Attending to issues would be a very expensive excercise and so should be avoided if possible.

    The Hibernation mode is the key - when the ocean gets too rough the system will take time out until the storm has passed.

    Cheers,

    Will
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