Notices
Results 1 to 11 of 11
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By John Galt

Thread: Earthquake Resistant Building Design

  1. #1 Earthquake Resistant Building Design 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    18
    This is my concept for earthquake resistant masonary construction.

    I.R.A.M. Interlocking Reinforced Ashlar Masonry

    Earthquake Resistant Design for Masonry Walls Utilizing a Mortar-Less Construction System

    The wall allows for more movement during a quake than standard masonry walls.

    What do you think?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,092
    Sounds interesting. But can't see much in that link. Have to be logged in or something.


    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    18
    Wow, the Scribed link works for most people which is why I use it the most.

    Earthquake Resistant design for Masonry Walls Utilizing a Mortar-less Construction System (Charles Laster) - Academia.edu

    Here is a link to my Academic page on it.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    18
    Well I have not received much feedback from forums like this, but I have started getting e-mails from civil engineering professionals in the field of earthquake design.

    Several professors have shared my paper with others in the field and one gave all his students a copy for this semester.

    So at least I am happy that the word is getting out about my I.R.A.M. masonry system.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1
    standard construction methods are not used by builders these days, it is because new techniques are superior and also ease the procedure to make favorable changes in the predefined methodology of building.

    HVAC school PA
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,632
    Hmm, i found what i saw actually pretty simple, and it has probably existed a long time already. There isn't really anything innovative in there. But i don't doubt mortarless masonry is more stable during earthquakes then when you use mortar.

    Though i doubt structures like this can take the pressure of a 30+ floor skyscraper. You will need steel, and concrete for that, structurally ofcourse. Wooden panes have been placed like this since the stoneage, they work with the same principle, and they are much lighter. So why not use wood instead?

    The best way to protect your building from earthquakes, is not build anything on, or near a faultline. Or you can make a building which does not touch the ground, or one shaped like a ball, that will simply roll instead of quake. And yes, i know my ideas are stupid, hehe, it was intended ..
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    18
    Zwolver

    I agree the basic concept is pretty simple, but oddly it has never been done before this way.

    I have done patent searches, historical searches, spoke with experts in the field from around the globe and no one has seen or heard of anything similar.

    Now there are a number of mortar-less block designs out there, but none were designed specifically with earthquake resistance as the primary concern. Most use complicated interlocking which require a number of block designs to complete a wall, most needs 6-12 different block shapes just to build a wall. This uses 2 and a top capstone for 3. If a very tall and thick wall is built, And one for the “through stone” for a total of 4.

    Now had you read the paper you would have seen that it does use steel reinforcement and can go 30+ stories if on wanted too, and you would have seen that the blocks can be made out of concrete or a number of other materials.

    Nearly every country in the world is in an earthquake zone. 59 of them in high risk zones. The High-risk zone for the New Madrid fault covers several states, so not building in an earthquake zone is not an option.

    As for you ball idea, been done several ways and base isolation removes a building from direct contact with the ground. So you ideas are not stupid, they are in fact state of the art in earthquake resistant design. These methods can also be used with my design for improved performance.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    985
    It looks like a winner to me. See if lego will fund an industrial start up. Seriously, this is good engineering. I expect IRAM to be the construction industry standard in a few years.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,169
    It looks very interesting and well thought out. I have one serious reservation. I see zero mathematical treatment of loadings and stresses. I'm not looking for full blown simulations, but some back of the envelope calculations would have been both reassuring and more convincing. Have you done anything in this direction, or is your idea to get this into the hands of people with the resources and skills to take it to that stage?
    Aireal likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    18
    John Galt

    Sadly due to brain injury I lost most of my math ability, which is why there are no calculations.

    But I have sent it to several Ph.D. professors in the earthquake engeineering field who have endorsed my work, one is sharing it with his students this semester, two are looking into possible testing of the concept, among others who have showed interest, like U.N. Habitat.

    So I am trying to bringing it to the attention of those who can take it to the next stage.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,169
    My regrets over your difficulties. I do think it definitely merits further consideration. That would include proper calculations of loading,etc. I wish I could help to get it into the hands of someone who might do that, but alas. I wish you well with it. Please keep us up to date on any developments.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Data correction methods resistant to pessimistic cases
    By Jarek Duda in forum Computer Science
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: April 25th, 2012, 11:19 AM
  2. Another Earthquake
    By Rickdog in forum Earth Sciences
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: April 11th, 2010, 11:53 AM
  3. Drug resistant bacteria
    By ScienceWizard in forum Biology
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: April 4th, 2009, 08:05 AM
  4. Heat Resistant Materials
    By Tharghana in forum Chemistry
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: January 6th, 2009, 04:20 PM
  5. Replies: 6
    Last Post: May 29th, 2008, 08:18 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •