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Thread: Help me? WATER and TILT ROTORS is this possible?

  1. #1 Help me? WATER and TILT ROTORS is this possible? 
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    ONLY WATER USED TO MOVE AND ROTATE A PROP USED TO HOUSE TILT ROTOR ENGINES.
    So I was thinking about deconstructing this sci-fi drop ship in a video and figuring out how it all works
    The aircraft is a vtol and uses four tilt props on each corner of the vehicle like a quad tilt rotor, the rotary prop houses two engines, probobly pulse jet engines, one aiming down [vtol], and the other aiming behind for thrust. it is encased in a aerodynamic winglet thingy with two fins at the end of this rotary prop.

    So this thread is not about the craft, it is about how the tilt props can "tilt" the entire prop with engines fins, everything is I would assume at least around 10 tons. So what if there was water involved in the tilting? Water is incompressible right, and with that lets imagine 4 square containers (for visualization purposes) lets fill them all with water, now between the top and bottom parts is a long thick sheet of metal with a rotary between the 4 containers. Because there is equal amount of water on both sides and no leaking and all is completely pressurized, not other gasses basically a vacuum with water. ect. the sheet of steel should stay in the same place. now lets drain 1.0 amount of water on the left bottom volume, it now has a pocket of vacuum, now at the same time we drain the bottom left volume we drain 1.0 of water on the top right volume. so now the sheet of steel should be 5 degrees tilted.
    you should get the idea now.
    (Note: all of this is not a design, it is a simple physics concept that can possibly be used for tilt rotors.)

    I don't know if this would be effective in real life but seems like it would be. I am curious to know any machines that use this method for moving massive objects or heavy objects.

    edit: The scifi drop ship I was talking about.
    D77-TC Pelican - Halo Nation

    Older thread and revisited thread:
    Experimental quad jet engine VTOL contraption.



    Last edited by Japith; August 7th, 2012 at 08:28 AM.
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  3. #2  
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    Bump! I still would like someones comment!

    Could this be a viable method?


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  4. #3  
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    It looks like you are trying to reinvent the hydraulic actuator. Of course, you should use hydraulic fluid, not water.
    Hydraulic cylinder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    It looks like you are trying to reinvent the hydraulic actuator. Of course, you should use hydraulic fluid, not water.
    Hydraulic cylinder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Huh, Hydraulic cylinder..
    I dunno if this helps but here, this is a concept of what I am talking about?

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  6. #5  
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    it seems overly complex.
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