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Thread: Can we make a new kind of spring?

  1. #1 Can we make a new kind of spring? 
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    I was wondering if it is possible to create a new type of spring or device that stays the same energy output as it's is being compressed? normally when you compress a spring the more one compresses it, the harder it is to compress.


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    Do you want it to be constant energy or constant force? If it is constant force, the energy stored will be directly proportional to the distance it is compressed. (Work = force x distance). You can make a device that will exert a constant force, for example, by connecting a piston to a regulated air supply. This kind of device would not act like a spring. As soon as you applied enough force to overcome the pressure, it would travel all the way to the end of the piston.
    Now that I think of it, a lever (see-saw) with a weight on one side would do the same thing.


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    Quote Originally Posted by jrmonroe View Post
    This?
    Constant-force spring - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    But I need it to act like a Compression spring with energy going out. It will be pushing against something.

    I noticed a conical spring can pull it off but how exactly?
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    You could connect the extension spring to a push rod through gears. What are you trying to make?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    You could connect the extension spring to a push rod through gears. What are you trying to make?
    I am trying to build a device which has a limited amount of output. The problem is that it relies heavily on a push force to start the thing up and I need to then compress another spring with the small amount of output that is partial coming from another spring. It's basically one spring pushing out with another energy source and then both are in the process of doing another activity while compressing the next spring that will then be used afterwards to push the energy source outwards and the process is repeated. The problem with a normal coil spring is that the more you compress it, the more energy it takes to compress it which is a luxury I don't have with this device.
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    The constant force spring described as a "ribbon" must be bent along it's length from end to end into a permant slight curvature, like we used to see old metal rulers made: when one end is bent sufficiently to flatten the side-to-side curvature, the flat thin piece will roll up forcefully on it's own accord, finally winding up as a tightly coiled rolled up piece of thin metal. Kind of hard to describe. To unroll it requires that stretching force be applied to pull it back into it's original long flat length; if unrolled thusly incompletely, it will roll back up into a coil.

    Tiny ones were used rather ingeniously by a manufacturer of ammunition magazines to eliminate the zig-zag, long spring used in them to force the "follower" up to the top of the magazine; they were tiny coils about the size of a fingernail. The inner end of the constant force spring, it being in the rolled-up condition when the follower was completely up at the top of the magazine, was held in place by a smooth pin rivetted to the upper end of the side of the magazine. The outer end of the coiled spring was fastened to the follower, thus placing an upwards force on the follower which remained constant as rounds of ammunition were added to the magazine; this system eliminated the "dead space" at the bottom which contained the compressed conventional spring, thereby allowing the mag to hold several additional rounds. The company was known as Ram-Line; The Clinton Crime Bill magazine ban caused them to cease production of these cleverly contrived magazines. They worked quite well, my own carry pistol still utilizing one of them.

    A company which originally made these springs had a trade-mark name for them at one time: "Negator Springs".

    Sorry for meandering! jocular
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