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Thread: producing heat

  1. #1 producing heat 
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    Does anyone know of a commercially available unit or a published design for a device that converts mechanical energy directly to heat? A preliminary search did not yield much info. perhaps because I do not know what such a device would be called. What kind of a heater is it?

    A scheme that was explained to me once involves two concentric cylinders separated by a layer of oil. When rotated, one against the other, it would produce considerable amounts of heat. Sounds to me like a simple and efficient device.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Daedalus View Post
    Does anyone know of a commercially available unit or a published design for a device that converts mechanical energy directly to heat? A preliminary search did not yield much info. perhaps because I do not know what such a device would be called. What kind of a heater is it?

    A scheme that was explained to me once involves two concentric cylinders separated by a layer of oil. When rotated, one against the other, it would produce considerable amounts of heat. Sounds to me like a simple and efficient device.

    See friction heater!


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    I did finally find it, but thank you for your response. It is interesting to note that on revisiting this topic, I discovered there to be more information available than there was almost a year ago when I first posted this. A growing interest, or a growing database?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daedalus View Post
    I did finally find it, but thank you for your response. It is interesting to note that on revisiting this topic, I discovered there to be more information available than there was almost a year ago when I first posted this. A growing interest, or a growing database?
    Most likely, a growing population of crackpots. A seach for "friction heater" turned up a video of a guy who hooked up an electric motor to a metal wheel, which rubbed against wooden blocks. He was quite proud that this device produced heat without using up his firewood!!

    Any idiot would know that the heat is actually coming from the electric motor, not the wooden blocks. A much easier way of generating the heat would be with a simple electric heater.

    It's easy to turn mechanical energy to heat. All mechanical energy ends up as heat. The brakes on an automobile are one example of such a device.
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    What idiot would know its not? "Any idiot would know that the heat is actually coming from the electric motor"
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    My own interest in this was the possibility of linking such a device directly to a wind turbine. The only scenario that makes sense. Not sure about torque, gearing, rpm's required, or the longevity of the apparatus under constant use. It does seem silly that everyone wants to run these things with an electric motor. Neither am I convinced about the over unity claims of "cavitation". Just a mechanical heater, that's all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daedalus View Post
    My own interest in this was the possibility of linking such a device directly to a wind turbine. The only scenario that makes sense. Not sure about torque, gearing, rpm's required, or the longevity of the apparatus under constant use. It does seem silly that everyone wants to run these things with an electric motor. Neither am I convinced about the over unity claims of "cavitation". Just a mechanical heater, that's all.
    I can see where your coming from, however I am at a loss at present as to how the heat generated from the wind turbine is delivered to the house.
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    one arrangement that comes to mind would be a small cabin with a vertical wind turbine (the ones that look like an egg beater) on the roof. The shaft coming streight down into the living space forming a space heater. may cut down on fuel bills, at least when the wind is blowing. Might be noisy; had not thought about that.
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    I googled "cavitation heater"...and saw a video of a guy who was making hot water and steam with the "steam hammer" effect. While he was claiming over-unity (which is impossible)...something like that might work for your kinetic heater. Although, I'd put it in a shed...and pipe the steam/hotwater into the house...and then through radiators.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Could one of the physicists of the board watch this video, and tell me if this would work. (not the over-unity part)



    I could see where a water heater like this could be useful in areas where an open flame would be dangerous. I'm just wondering if would be more efficient than electric heating coils.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    The list of people claiming impossible goes back to days of the nuckle draggers.

    Water is not frictionless. The inner drum has closeness to outer drum, spinning the water increase the friction. The same heating happens when a centrifical pump cant reach to water head.
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    yes. a wind powered boiler house would be impressive. But I'm not looking at anything on such an industrial scale. I'm into off grid tiny houses and stuff like that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daedalus View Post
    yes. a wind powered boiler house would be impressive. But I'm not looking at anything on such an industrial scale. I'm into off grid tiny houses and stuff like that.
    Have you considered a micro turbine CO2/water its one litre in size and begins power output of 720 watts at-10* Celius, and increases the wattages at higher heat levels.
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    Or better yet....solar panels.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Or, just go for broke and buy an engine.





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    Even better 12 cylinder Diesels come in even bigger sizes.
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  18. #17  
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    Bigger is better...at least that's what my girlfriend says.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Bit of a slash to the ego that is!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Could one of the physicists of the board watch this video, and tell me if this would work. (not the over-unity part)

    I could see where a water heater like this could be useful in areas where an open flame would be dangerous. I'm just wondering if would be more efficient than electric heating coils.
    If you watch the video, you see that they actually brought somebody in from a university who debunked their overunity idea. They weren't taking accurate enough readings.
    There is no doubt you can heat water by pumping it around in a loop. That is the way that nuclear power plants heat up the reactor coolant system to operating temperature before starting up the reactor. Just run the reactor coolant pumps. Like electric heating coils, this is 100 percent efficient in converting electrical power to heat. It's easy to make heat. Heat is the most disordered form of energy there is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Could one of the physicists of the board watch this video, and tell me if this would work. (not the over-unity part)

    I could see where a water heater like this could be useful in areas where an open flame would be dangerous. I'm just wondering if would be more efficient than electric heating coils.
    If you watch the video, you see that they actually brought somebody in from a university who debunked their overunity idea. They weren't taking accurate enough readings.
    There is no doubt you can heat water by pumping it around in a loop. That is the way that nuclear power plants heat up the reactor coolant system to operating temperature before starting up the reactor. Just run the reactor coolant pumps. Like electric heating coils, this is 100 percent efficient in converting electrical power to heat. It's easy to make heat. Heat is the most disordered form of energy there is.
    I note your not allowed to post attachments either! Least its just me then,, wonder what the others did to score the privilage of posting attachment. Can you give us a hint where the video may be found and I will get back to you,
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaS Energy View Post
    I note your not allowed to post attachments either! Least its just me then,, wonder what the others did to score the privilage of posting attachment. Can you give us a hint where the video may be found and I will get back to you,
    The video I was referring to is the one embedded by MacGyver1968 in post 10 above. If you cannot post attachments, it might be that your post count is not high enough yet.
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    Thanks Harold14370, though not being able to attach doesnt help much.

    To answer you question, the video shown of water friction heater, as will any water friction heater, heat the water to 100*C after that it turns to steam and the friction is lost.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaS Energy View Post
    Thanks Harold14370, though not being able to attach doesnt help much.

    To answer you question, the video shown of water friction heater, as will any water friction heater, heat the water to 100*C after that it turns to steam and the friction is lost.
    .
    I didn't actually have a question, but thanks for answering. What do you mean when you say the friction is lost?
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    Sorry about that, got confused. But to actualy answer a question you ask. Water is solid and Steam is not, so the fricton of solid on solid is lost when the water turns to steam.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaS Energy View Post
    Sorry about that, got confused. But to actualy answer a question you ask. Water is solid and Steam is not, so the fricton of solid on solid is lost when the water turns to steam.
    This is easily dealt with. If you remove the heat at the same rate you are putting it into the fluid, the temperature will not rise. So you need to pump the water through a heat exchanger, like a radiator, and dissipate the heat through the room. Also, if your system is pressurized, the temperature can increase above 100 C without boiling.
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    So why not hook up that guys cavity heater to a feedback loop so that it powers itself?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    So why not hook up that guys cavity heater to a feedback loop so that it powers itself?
    I suspect you already know the answer to this, but for the benefit of anybody who does not know, it would not power itself. That would violate the law of conservation of energy- first law of thermodynamics.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DaS Energy View Post
    Sorry about that, got confused. But to actualy answer a question you ask. Water is solid and Steam is not, so the fricton of solid on solid is lost when the water turns to steam.
    This is easily dealt with. If you remove the heat at the same rate you are putting it into the fluid, the temperature will not rise. So you need to pump the water through a heat exchanger, like a radiator, and dissipate the heat through the room. Also, if your system is pressurized, the temperature can increase above 100 C without boiling.
    I agree. Also if you limit the RPM the water temperature does not rise nor does the water boil. Also the energy need to crash water at high velocity acheives greater heating by othe rmeans.
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    the first law of thermodynamics is no longer, thanks to NASA and DaS Energy in 2002.
    You must be joking.

    I've neither heard nor seen anything from NASA about this spectacular, 8 year old puncturing of universally accepted physical laws.

    You'd think there would have been something circulating in the whisperings from the backrooms at the half a dozen AAAS meetings since then. Nothing from the Royal Society, any of the national academies of science around the world, no letters to Nature or Science - nothing.

    I don't buy it.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Adelady is responding to a post by Das Energy which I split off into the pseudoscience section.
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    the first law of thermodynamics is no longer, thanks to NASA and DaS Energy in 2002.
    You must be joking.

    I've neither heard nor seen anything from NASA about this spectacular, 8 year old puncturing of universally accepted physical laws.

    You'd think there would have been something circulating in the whisperings from the backrooms at the half a dozen AAAS meetings since then. Nothing from the Royal Society, any of the national academies of science around the world, no letters to Nature or Science - nothing.

    I don't buy it.
    Try search, its a usefull tool. Goodbye!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Adelady is responding to a post by Das Energy which I split off into the pseudoscience section.
    Still I search for a forum with some intellect, Goodbye.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaS Energy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Adelady is responding to a post by Das Energy which I split off into the pseudoscience section.
    Still I search for a forum with some intellect, Goodbye.
    You won't be missed.
    adelady likes this.
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