Notices
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Manufacturing

  1. #1 Manufacturing 
    KRM
    KRM is offline
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    8
    Can anyone tell me the difference or similarity between JIT and Kanban ?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3
    Can anyone tell me the difference or similarity between JIT and Kanban ?
    How long have you got?

    JIT is an inventory minimisation technique. JIT "pulls" components into the manufacturing process when they are needed. This is in contrast to the "forecast and push" system of making and stashing things in the hope or expectation that they will be needed.

    A Kanban is the signal (once a bit of card tagged to a hopper or some such) that is used to call for more components. When the hopper is empty you send the kanban back down the process and some guy makes widgets to refill it. Kanbans are these days electronic bits of card in computers.

    But Kanban as a word as it is used now is all of that and process re-engineering and continuous improvement (and all sorts of things too esoteric to worry about). Kanban is the symbol representing a philospophy of doing things the right way, first time, and with zero waste.

    Words to google are kaizen, continuous improvement, six sigma, the five Ss...

    Hope this helps,
    TC


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    KRM
    KRM is offline
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    8
    ok..

    Do you think, production scheduling is partly a way to achieve what they call lean manufacturing these days ? I can imagine that some\most(?) production scheduling systems schedule jobs for a planning horizon like a shift, on a push principle.

    In my opinion, when i schedule jobs in such a way that reduce job waiting times, and in-process inventory is reduced, i do achieve some "lean"ness in my production system on the shop floor level. But on an organization level, i can make my master production schedule to satisfy customer order in a make to order fashion or JIT.

    So, can i say, that on the higher level, i have a pull production system, while on the shop floor i have a push production system ?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    159
    The Kanban process utilizes two different kinds of cards - transport Kanban and production Kanban. Both of the cards do not have to be used simultaneously in a production process. The transport Kanban contains information from where the part/component originated and its destination. When only this card is used, it is known as a simple Kanban process. In this system components are ordered and produced according to a daily schedule. Roos (1992: 113) describes this system as “ordering a box when it is the only one left on line”. The production Kanban, on the other hand, outlines to what extent and when work has to be accomplished by a specific station on the production line (Roos, 1992: 113). Together with the transport Kanban, it is known as an integrated Kanban process. This system is often used between the corporation and its suppliers. Here, the corporation’s transport Kanban is the card which regulates the supplier’s production Kanban. The same amount of components are produced as used in production and the maximum stock level is determined by the number of cards that are in circulation.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by KRM
    ok..

    Do you think, production scheduling is partly a way to achieve what they call lean manufacturing these days ? I can imagine that some\most(?) production scheduling systems schedule jobs for a planning horizon like a shift, on a push principle.

    In my opinion, when i schedule jobs in such a way that reduce job waiting times, and in-process inventory is reduced, i do achieve some "lean"ness in my production system on the shop floor level. But on an organization level, i can make my master production schedule to satisfy customer order in a make to order fashion or JIT.

    So, can i say, that on the higher level, i have a pull production system, while on the shop floor i have a push production system ?
    It sounds to me like you're talking about achieving lean and going past that into the "Lean and Agile" phase. A lot of folks talk about "agile" as the next level beyond "lean."
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •