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Thread: Piping System Improvement at a Formaldehyde Resin Plant!

  1. #1 Piping System Improvement at a Formaldehyde Resin Plant! 
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    i'm currently working for a Formaldehyde Resin plant. and i constantly encounter gelled/hardened glue in the pipeline which would in turn slow down or virtually block off the transfer of the resin(glue) into storage tanks. is there anythg i can do other than reverting to water/steam spray to clean out the gelled glue and also to make sure the resin doesn't stay in the pipeline?


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  3. #2  
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    The straightforward answer would be to prevent the glue from curing, be it by light, heat, contact with air or another catalyst.

    Another idea is use a material for the tubing on which the glue doesn't stick, or apply a coating on the inside of the glue. Teflon is a good material for most glues.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    Increase the flow velocity, which increases the shear rate and would tend to reduce the rate of adhesion. This works with many types of fouling.

    Is the formation of the deposits temperature dependent? If cold temperatures contribute to gelling you could consider heat tracing with steam jacket or electric tracing.
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  5. #4  
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    If the pipes are uniform in thickness and have mild bend or turns, use a pig (a ball or a plug) to wipe the resin from the walls.
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  6. #5  
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    BTW it is ADHESIVE not GLUE, using the term glue makes you sound like an amateur.
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  7. #6  
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    What nonsense is that. In my experience, people who insist on using a more difficult word are hiding a lack of real knowledge. Unless special nuance is required, the most common word is always preferable.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bunbury
    Increase the flow velocity, which increases the shear rate and would tend to reduce the rate of adhesion. This works with many types of fouling.
    So narrower pipe...?
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    Quote Originally Posted by Bunbury
    Increase the flow velocity, which increases the shear rate and would tend to reduce the rate of adhesion. This works with many types of fouling.
    So narrower pipe...?
    ...or increased pumping rate. Either way it means more power consumption.
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  10. #9  
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    well, yeah it is basically temperature dependent. however, it doesn't just harden or gell because of being subjected to cold temperatures, it could also take place when the temperature is high because of the reactivity of the glue.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by calebdanvers
    well, yeah it is basically temperature dependent. however, it doesn't just harden or gell because of being subjected to cold temperatures, it could also take place when the temperature is high because of the reactivity of the glue.
    "could" sounds like you're not sure. Do you know the temperature vs. time vs. reaction rate characteristics of the resin? Is the resin being heated in the pipe by warm ambient temperatures? Does the problem not occur in winter? If high ambient temperature is the problem you could insulate the pipe, or if that's not enough you could install a cooling jacket. But it sounds as if you need to gather some data and do a bit more analysis to figure out what is really going on.
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