Notices
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Ti-83 Calculator... Matrices with polynomial coefficients..?

  1. #1 Ti-83 Calculator... Matrices with polynomial coefficients..? 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5
    Is there a program for the ti-83 that can solve systems of equations with polynomial coefficients? Or anyway to create and manipulate matrices that contain polynomial coefficients?

    I am using Cramer's rule to solve systems of differential equations in Laplace space. So, almost all of the coefficients contain an unknown complex number 's'. With 3 or more equations, this becomes rather cumbersome to do by hand.

    Yes, this can easily be done in Mathematica or Matlab, but I can only use a Ti-83.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,838
    To my knowledge the TI-83 isn't able to do anything like that, at least not with its standard features.


    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,838
    Whoa, sorry about that, my computer was acting weird.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,838
    ditto. Mods, delete these last two if you get a chance...
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Professor serpicojr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    JRZ
    Posts
    1,069
    You can definitely do this, but it would involve some programming. Hopefully you can upload stuff to your calculator from your computer--the code itself shouldn't be too hard, but typing it on your calculator would be a real pain. You can represent matrices as strings of numbers. Addition is easy, multiplication only slightly harder. The hardest thing would be the division algorithm, i.e. something that does polynomial long division for you. You'd also likely need the Euclidean algorithm, but this is just a hop, skip and a jump away from the division algorithm. I bet you can find the relevant code somewhere on the net.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5
    Yea I was thinking I could easily write a program to perform this.. but like you said, I will Not be typing into my Ti-83. I guess I'll just stick to doing them the fun way
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •