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Thread: mathematics: the science of numbers

  1. #1 mathematics: the science of numbers 
    Forum Ph.D. streamSystems's Avatar
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    Just a quick question: could one argue that mathematics is the science of numbers.


    Imagine the limitless fields of numbers.........0 to infinity or minus-infinity, real, and complex, fractions and whole.

    Could one argue that "mathematics" is actually the "research and experimentation" of all the ways those numbers can LINK together?


    Just another quick question that follows on from that: if we could label space-time numerically (somehow, obviously, space and time), could we "in theory" explain space-time using mathematics and only mathematics?

    If so, could one suggest space-time represents a fundamental, however complex, algorithm, between the values of zero and infinity/-infinity?

    If not, why not.

    Any ideas?

    I know it;s a simple question asked by all scientsists and mathematicians, because it;s obviously one of those DaaAA concepts (most of mine are), but I had a big New Years, and I need a refresher course on some basic axiom-ideals of mathematics and science.


    (I have to go to night school, so I'll only be able to respond in 10 or so hours).


    Does a theory of everything therefore need to be purely theoretical and only account for the known laws and forces in handling the improbability of fortune telling?

    the www feature below can explain it better.
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    Forum Professor serpicojr's Avatar
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    I would argue that math satisfies all of the criteria of being a science save for two: it doesn't directly study observable physical phenomena; and the mathematical method places greater emphasis on logical proof than on experimentation. However, I would say (and a great many mathematicians would concur) that math is the science of patterns. Numbers are a small fraction (seriously, no pun intended) of the many mathematical structures that mathematicians study.

    However, I don't think whether or not you consider math to be a science affects the answer to your second question. Math is practical in (and essential to) the sciences no matter what you call it. And I do think that the answer to your second question is the affirmative, although perhaps not in the manner that you suggest...


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    Forum Ph.D. streamSystems's Avatar
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    I think the second part of the question aimed to ask whether or not it is possible to theorise space-time PURELY as a theory.

    If that is not possible, then how could a pure theory on space-time be possible.....the so-called "grand unified equation"?
    Does a theory of everything therefore need to be purely theoretical and only account for the known laws and forces in handling the improbability of fortune telling?

    the www feature below can explain it better.
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