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  1. #1 set theory 
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
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    I feel like learning set theory just for the heck of it. What kind of mathematical background should one have before learning set theory? Can anyone suggest a good book on it, preferably one with practice problems?


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  3. #2  
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    Set Theory and Logic by Robert R. Stoll

    Set Theory and Metric Spaces by Irving Kaplansky

    An Outline of Set Theory* by James M. Henle

    Naive Set Theory* by Paul R. Halmos

    Set Theory by Charles C. Pinter

    Classic Set Theory For Guided Independent Study by Derek Goldrei


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacketate
    Classic Set Theory For Guided Independent Study by Derek Goldrei
    I actually found this one on amazon.com after I made the post. The reviews for it are good, so I might end up going with it. Thanks.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
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  5. #4 Re: set theory 
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    What kind of mathematical background should one have before learning set theory?
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
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  6. #5  
    Forum Professor serpicojr's Avatar
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    Sorry to answer your question with a question, but what's your background in math?
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by serpicojr
    Sorry to answer your question with a question, but what's your background in math?
    I'm a college freshman. I've taken Calculus I and I'm taking Calculus II next semester. I'm planning on taking Statistics next year if that makes a difference.
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    I liked "Elements of Set Theory" by Herbert Enderton.

    I don't think it has any pre-requisites... Set Theory starts everything from zero. But perhaps I did have some background without noticing if you get what I mean.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stranger
    I liked "Elements of Set Theory" by Herbert Enderton.

    I don't think it has any pre-requisites... Set Theory starts everything from zero. But perhaps I did have some background without noticing if you get what I mean.
    Ok, I'll check that one out. I see what you mean about having some background without noticing. It does seem to me like it's pretty independent from the other areas of math, thus not requiring much knowledge in other areas. Thanks.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Professor serpicojr's Avatar
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    Yeah, you definitely don't need calculus or linear algebra or anything for an introductory course in set theory. That's not my concern. My concern is the experience you have with mathematical proof. If you've never seen it before, you may have some difficulty understanding and/or appreciating what is going on in proofs. Of course, we the members of the forum would be happy to help you out!
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by serpicojr
    Yeah, you definitely don't need calculus or linear algebra or anything for an introductory course in set theory. That's not my concern. My concern is the experience you have with mathematical proof. If you've never seen it before, you may have some difficulty understanding and/or appreciating what is going on in proofs. Of course, we the members of the forum would be happy to help you out!
    I haven't seen too much of proofs. I'm a smart guy though, so hopefully I'll be ok. Unfortunately, I doubt I can afford any books at the moment, and I doubt my current chemistry/conservation bio education path will give me a chance for set theory, but I'd like to get some at some point, and when that happens I'm sure I'll come here if I need any help. Thanks!
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