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Thread: how trigometry is applied

  1. #1 how trigometry is applied 
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    hello,everyone:

    can anybody tell me how the trigometry is applied in real world senerio,i am interested in computer science and engineering,and i am not very well in trigometry when i was in high school,and do not think the math a serious matter,until recently i find that a effective and fast architecture modeling require excellent math skill,but truly i don't know why i need to study the trigometry.

    any tips is appreciated


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  3. #2  
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    well, i forget to say:
    a lot of my problem on the calculas textbook have the requirement of trigometry, i doubt if i need to review the trigometry or hinder my further study of calculas.


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  4. #3 Re: how trigometry is applied 
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    Quote Originally Posted by kreidxkj
    can anybody tell me how the trigometry is applied in real world senerio,i am interested in computer science and engineering,and i am not very well in trigometry
    I don't know about computer sciece, but I can tell you this, for sure.
    An engineer who doesn't know trig is going to be in real trouble.
    In fact, sticking my neck out here, I would say that trig is only useful in the real-world scenario.

    How much calculus have you done? Don't you know that a large number of seemingly straight-forward integrals have trig or even hyperbolic trig solutions?
    That's essential in engineerining
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  5. #4  
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    Dr.Rocket, I'm personally rather interested in this question myself: I already am aware of a few applications, but I'm interested in learning more about how trigonometry is applied. Do you think you can help?
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellatha
    Dr.Rocket, I'm personally rather interested in this question myself: I already am aware of a few applications, but I'm interested in learning more about how trigonometry is applied. Do you think you can help?
    Surveying is largely trigonometry.

    Vector mechanics requires resolution of vectors into spedific components -- trigonometry. A simple example is the determination of the banking of curves on racetracks without which both the drivers and spectators would be in great danger.

    Navigation is largely trigonometry.

    The theory of vibrations is based largely on the study of sinusoids.

    The theory of AC electric circuits is based on sinusoidal voltage.

    Radio signals are modulated by sinusoids.

    Polar and spherical coordinates make essential use of sine and cosine functions.

    The theory of Fourier series is based on trigonometric functions and in fact the standard treatise on the subject is Zygmund's Trigonometric Series. Sines and cosines form a complete orthonormal set for the Hilber space of square integrable functions on and interval.

    Communication theory in electrical engineering is largely driven by the theory of the Fourier transform, again trigonometric functions.

    Probably the most important single equation in physics is Euler's formula . See The Feynman Lectures on Physics for more application to physics.


    After polynomials, trigonometric functions are probably the most used functions in mathematics, physics and engineering. Suffice it to say that any engineer or physicist who is not proficient in trigonometry should find another line of work.
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  7. #6  
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    Don't study science or engineering if you want a job.
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  8. #7  
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    Although, if you actually want to better yourself, learning science, engineering, mathematics, damn near anything, really, is good for you.
    Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools, because they have to say something.
    -Plato

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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokey
    Don't study science or engineering if you want a job.
    Surely you don't mean this.

    What do suggest, philosopohy and literature ?
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  10. #9  
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    Thanks Dr. Rocket--a rather comprehensive list.

    Smokey,
    A rather ridiculous statement considering the president of the United States stated that he would like to see more mathematics and science majors. In a time of war mathematics is, since before WWII, heavily used in addition to the need for alternative energy sources and the time of cloning. There is plenty of room for jobs in mathematics, science, and engineering, especially considering most people are looking for degrees in business and in the medical field.

    EDIT: The earnings aren't too bad either:


    Many mathematicians work for federal and state government departments. The Department of Defense and NASA are the largest federal employers of mathematicians.

    Those employed in the private sector often work for research and testing facilities, public relations firms, and security exchanges. Mathematicians in manufacturing usually work for drug companies. Other mathematicians work for banks, insurance companies, and public utilities. Some are employed by public and private colleges as professors and researchers.

    In general, people in this career can expect to earn anywhere from about $50,000 to $135,000 a year. The median annual income for mathematicians is around $91,000.

    Their specific income depends on a number of factors, including employer, location, experience, and level of education. Mathematicians with PhDs often earn higher salaries than those with masterís or bachelorís degrees. Similarly, the average income for mathematicians employed by the federal government is about $94,000 a year.

    Income also depends on the kind of work they do. For instance, those who work as professors at colleges can earn anywhere from about $40,000 to over $100,000 a year, depending on their experience.

    Mathematicians who work in the financial sector may have the potential for higher earnings. For example, actuaries typically start off earning about $48,000 to $60,000 a year. However, those who progress to the management level can make over $150,000 a year.

    In addition to a salary, most mathematicians receive additional benefits such as vacation and sick leave, health and life insurance, and retirement plan contributions.
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  11. #10  
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    trigonometry has a lot to do with complex 3d gpraphics.
    the more science you know, the less crap you get.
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  12. #11  
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    You should ask which applications don't require trigonometry.

    A few other examples in computer science are: audio signals, signal modulation, sampling/digitalisation, image processing (no need to go complex or 3D, a simple rotation, or drawing of a circle will do), jpeg compression...

    On the topic of studying engineering: I happen to be one, so I know a lot of engineers. None of them ever had to do much effort to choose which job they preferred to do ("finding" a job does not apply for engineers). None of them lost their job during the crisis. In fact, some of them even got a raise last year in the middle of the crisis. If you want to find a good job and don't risk ever having financial problems, I advice you to study engineering.
    Or mechanics/electricians/programmers... they all tend to be (and remain) in high demand too.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bender

    On the topic of studying engineering: I happen to be one, so I know a lot of engineers. None of them ever had to do much effort to choose which job they preferred to do ("finding" a job does not apply for engineers). None of them lost their job during the crisis. In fact, some of them even got a raise last year in the middle of the crisis. If you want to find a good job and don't risk ever having financial problems, I advice you to study engineering.
    Or mechanics/electricians/programmers... they all tend to be (and remain) in high demand too.
    That experience is not universal, although I do agree that engineering is a good career choice.

    I not only knoow of engineers who have lost jobs in economic downturns, I know a great many of them I have had to be the one to tell them they were being let go in some instances. I know of probably a few hundred more who will be let go in the next 4 months or so. It happens.

    On the other hand, companies try to retain their best technical talent because it is valuable. Engineers tend to be the creators of wealth and are therefore somewhat prized by industry.
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