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Thread: 0 = -1 + 1?

  1. #1 0 = -1 + 1? 
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    If a particle collides with an anti-particle, should it give -1 + 1 = 0? Therefor, would 0 = -1 + 1 be reasonable? Is it possible that it in fact can be reversed. I will study in year 12 / form 6 in September, so you see, my knowledge of science is very small, I am only interested. I am a student, so sorry if I seem ignorant.


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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    For various properties, that is true. For example, particles and anti-particles have opposite charge and so the result is uncharged particles (photons).

    However, both particles have (positive) energy and so the resulting photons have the same total energy as the original particles.


    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    The construct as a mathematical expression is accurate but it is not applicable to particle/anti-particle interactions. Although anti-particles and particles will annihilate, it is not total; there is some mass left remaining.
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    Try not to confuse mathematics and physics. -1 + 1 = 0 is a purely mathematical statement. Particle antiparticle annihilation is a physics statement.
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    What if the principle of Quantum Fluctuation applies?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    The construct as a mathematical expression is accurate but it is not applicable to particle/anti-particle interactions. Although anti-particles and particles will annihilate, it is not total; there is some mass left remaining.
    As well as the energy released during the collision. Seems to me that the law of conservation applies here as well.
    As I understand it a negatively charged object will attract a positively charged object and combine into a neutrally charged system.

    An atom is a perfect example of such a system containing both positive and negatively charged particles. This can result in a stable system or an unstable system (uranium), which sheds particles.
    When we apply sufficient pressure to force them together, we have a tremendous release of energy.
    Last edited by Write4U; August 11th, 2013 at 07:43 PM.
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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaMSD5 View Post
    What if the principle of Quantum Fluctuation applies?
    Can you explain what that means? How would it apply? To what?
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    ▼▼ dn ʎɐʍ sıɥʇ ▼▼ RedPanda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stars3purple69 View Post
    in binary 1 plus one equals three because 0 is included with one remainder because the 0 is not a one.
    1 + 1 = 210 = 102

    I am not sure where you are getting the 'three' from.

    {abe} I think the post I am replying to has been moved...
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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedPanda View Post
    I am not sure where you are getting the 'three' from.
    Talking to yourself? There's no one there, you know.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    ▼▼ dn ʎɐʍ sıɥʇ ▼▼ RedPanda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Talking to yourself? There's no one there, you know.
    Well, it wouldn't be the first time - but this time I thought there was someone actually there.
    SayBigWords.com/say/3FC

    "And, behold, I come quickly;" Revelation 22:12

    "Religions are like sausages. When you know how they are made, you no longer want them."
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaMSD5 View Post
    If a particle collides with an anti-particle, should it give -1 + 1 = 0?
    Huge amounts of energy are given off by particle / anti-particle collisions. The Enterprise is run by matter/antimatter interactions, mediated by dilithium crystals.

    Dilithium (Star Trek) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Even though Star Trek is fiction, it's actually useful in serving to remind us that matter/antimatter reactions release energy. So we see that fiction can be applied productively to real world problems.

    The philosophical doctrine that mathematics is a useful fiction is called Fictionalism.

    Fictionalism in the Philosophy of Mathematics (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

    In that context, -1 + 1 = 0 is a true statement ... in the fictional world of mathematics. Just as "Kirk is captain of the Enterprise" is a true statement in the fictional world of Star Trek (original). If some physicist or bookkeeper happens to find that fact useful in real life, good for them. But if not, it's still a good story.

    It's often useful to take lessons from fiction and apply them to real life. But as someone already mentioned, math and physics are two different things. When you think about math, think about a fictional world that may or may not be useful for anything. And when you think of physics, think of the real, actual world we live in ... which can often be understood better by using math. And Star Trek.
    Last edited by someguy1; August 20th, 2013 at 09:40 PM.
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