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Thread: Is there any "secret" to being good at Math?

  1. #1 Is there any "secret" to being good at Math? 
    Forum Sophomore jakesyl's Avatar
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    Although I do realize this is somewhat of an idiodic question, I'm just curios. What is it that makes people good at math?
    Is it:
    Practice
    Logical Thinking
    Little "Tricks"

    What makes you guys so good at math, I'm an aspiring programmer who is currently laggingg behind due to my comparitively poor math skills, Just wondering.


    "The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error; but who does strive to do deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold souls who neither know victory nor defeat."
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  3. #2  
    Malignant Pimple shlunka's Avatar
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    All of the above. Practice will help, as with all subjects any innate talent is useless unless you read the proper material to learn how to apply it. Unfortunately, the largest factor may be natural ability, my math teachers have always told me I have a very good mathematical mind, but coupled with a lack of interest in mathematics itself my skills in the area are mediocre at best. As to little "tricks" some of those are simply to assist with mental calculations, I.E, to calculate a %15 tip you simply divide the total by 10, then see what 1/2 of that 1/10 would be and add it to the 1/10 you divided. In short, practice will certainly help cultivate your math skills, but not everyone could be a good mathematician.


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  4. #3  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Is there any "secret" to being good at Math?
    Yes. But it's a secret. Sorry.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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  5. #4  
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    Like almost anything, being interested means you will practice which means you will get better at it.
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    As someone who struggled with mathematics, the only real solution I've found is repitition. You have to do your target math problems every. single. day.

    When you have a break from classes, keep doing math problems. When you have a weekend out of town, take your math problems with you. When you're off school for a whole summer, do not stop doing math problems.

    If you make them as much a part of your routine as brushing your teeth, you will start to approach them without fear, with a feeling of familiarity. Make math second nature. It's the only thing that worked for me.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakesyl View Post
    What makes you guys so good at math ...
    Obviously, I shouldn't have answered as I am not at all good at math.
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  8. #7  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Define the level of math we're talking about. I can add on my fingers like a pro.
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    Forum Ph.D. merumario's Avatar
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    Your question is more important than you thought i could be. Apparently all of the above will help you and Me too. There's a saying that 'if you leave math for one day it will leave you for 2weeks'
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  10. #9  
    Forum Junior anticorncob28's Avatar
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    My answer is to practice it and get better. Question: what's the angle between the hands of a clock at 5:15? Use your logic with that, and you can find a formula to find the angle at any a:b time. Look at proofs for theorems and try to prove them yourself.
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  11. #10  
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    Yea that good logical way. 24hours which is 1440mins make 360degrees. ie 1min=0.25degrees, 5hours:15mins=315mins=0.25*315=78.75degrees.... Common jυѕт try stuff like that.
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  12. #11  
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    Your first hurdle, is to stop thinking that you have poor math skills.
    Then enjoy the adventure of learning new math tricks---much of math is intuitive----if you can start to enjoy math, your skill set will expand rapidly.
    ............
    anecdote: (my little secret)
    In one of my math classes at the University of Oklahoma, I happened to sit next to a rather attractive woman with long auburn hair.
    For one of the tests, she had written the formulas on her thighs. When I came upon a problem that stymied my mind, I looked to her thighs, and was pulling her skirt up higher to read the next formula as I stared intently at her thigh, while the professor walked by our row. Seeing me staring intently at her thigh, with my hand on her skirt, he completely misread the interaction, and quickly moved on.-----The moral of this little story is: Sit next to a pretty woman with long auburn hair! The rest is easy.
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    I think it is because their are a good listener.Doing math is easy specially if you listen very well to your teacher because many teacher explain the solution on every math problem sometimes it is just a matter of asking question in order to you to know how they find the solution and what are all those stuff they use to solve it.
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  14. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by merumario View Post
    Yea that good logical way. 24hours which is 1440mins make 360degrees. ie 1min=0.25degrees, 5hours:15mins=315mins=0.25*315=78.75degrees.... Common jυѕт try stuff like that.
    I have no idea what you're working out here, but: the hour hand completes a rotation every 12 hours.

    Try again.
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  15. #14  
    Forum Ph.D. merumario's Avatar
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    That's your part of the math.

    From what am seeing from where am sitting, 360dgr of the second hand=0.17dgr turned by d min hand,360dgr turned by the min hand=0.25dgr turned by the hour hand,and 360dgr of hour hand equals 24hours(a brand new day). From my view,its MECHANICAL transit to MATHEMATICAL transit.

    How does it look from where you are sitting?
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  16. #15  
    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Unless you are looking at a 24 hour analogue clock your figures are faulty.
    The majority of clocks have 12 as the highest number = two full "cycles" per day, therefore twice the speed you have stated.
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  17. #16  
    Forum Ph.D. merumario's Avatar
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    Then that's how it looks from where you are sitting.
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  18. #17  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakesyl View Post
    Although I do realize this is somewhat of an idiodic question, I'm just curios. What is it that makes people good at math?
    Is it:
    Practice
    Logical Thinking
    Little "Tricks"

    What makes you guys so good at math, I'm an aspiring programmer who is currently laggingg behind due to my comparitively poor math skills, Just wondering.
    1. "Practice" is pretty standard with any learning, but mentally pounding yourself with what you don't understand is torture. (See #2 below)

    2. "Logical Thinking" sounds about right. If you understand "why" you're doing what you're doing, then it's easy to remember and to cause it to happen.

    3. "Little Tricks" probably won't really help until you understand why they work. (See #2 above)

    It looks like #2 stands out as the best answer to me.

    I agree with Flick Montana, what kind of math are you struggling with right now?
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  19. #18  
    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by merumario View Post
    Then that's how it looks from where you are sitting.
    I have no idea whatsoever what this means, nor does it explain why you have incorrect figures.
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  20. #19  
    Forum Ph.D. merumario's Avatar
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    duck am looking at a 24hours clock. i think that's obvious when you made your calculation and saw the discrepancy.


    is there any need for you to repeat and repeat it over and over again? your is 12hours but am using 24=360degrs.
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  21. #20  
    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by merumario View Post
    duck am looking at a 24hours clock. i think that's obvious when you made your calculation and saw the discrepancy.
    is there any need for you to repeat and repeat it over and over again? your is 12hours but am using 24=360degrs.
    A) As pointed out - the VAST majority of [analogue] clocks have 12 as the highest number - so you were being misleading.
    B) You were also being deliberately obscure - there's no need for the "how it looks from where you're sitting" crap 1.

    Neither of those is any help to someone asking for advice.

    Oh yeah: and your "answer" is still wrong.
    Read the question.

    Oh yeah: 50% of the analogue clocks I own don't even have hands.

    1 Especially as I can't even see a clock from where I'm sitting.
    Last edited by Dywyddyr; July 24th, 2013 at 12:53 PM.
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  22. #21  
    Forum Sophomore jakesyl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by merumario View Post
    duck am looking at a 24hours clock. i think that's obvious when you made your calculation and saw the discrepancy.


    is there any need for you to repeat and repeat it over and over again? your is 12hours but am using 24=360degrs.
    \
    12=360 too.
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  23. #22  
    Forum Ph.D. merumario's Avatar
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    yea, 12h=360dgrs but to be a day it would have to be 2rotation(2*360). duck your evaluations are noted!
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  24. #23  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakesyl View Post
    What is it that makes people good at math?
    Is it:
    Practice
    Logical Thinking
    Little "Tricks"
    I'd say that's about right for being good at math. To be great at math, I'd say you need to think outside of the box. That way you may come up with ideas nobody else has thought of.

    What makes you guys so good at math...
    I love math, but I'm merely a hobbyist. Personally, I'm not crazy about being labeled as "good at math." It makes me feel like a geek!

    My advice to you is to make good use of graphing calculators and math software. It makes math much easier. Also, try to think visually about math. Do a lot of sketching, make up your own problems, and check the answers to see if they are the correct solutions. I use drawing software to create illustrations of the concepts I'm studying. It helps a lot.

    Jagella
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    Quote Originally Posted by shlunka View Post
    In short, practice will certainly help cultivate your math skills, but not everyone could be a good mathematician.
    I'd love to come up with a way to guarantee that anybody who is willing to apply the effort can become proficient at math including calculus and linear algebra. I think it can be done.

    Jagella
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  26. #25  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    If you make them as much a part of your routine as brushing your teeth, you will start to approach them without fear, with a feeling of familiarity. Make math second nature. It's the only thing that worked for me.
    That sounds like good advice. I've found that the more I work at math, the more I like it. It's an acquired taste, I suppose.

    Jagella
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  27. #26  
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    I can balance a 4 million dollar account (not mine) ....but you ask me a math problem, I freak.

    Husband can give you an answer in about 4 seconds...at his worse...7.....
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  28. #27  
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    I can balance a 4 million dollar account (not mine).
    When I was in college I majored in accounting and business administration. The accounting I studied along with taxation and finance was challenging. It sounds like you have some respectable skills if you can handle large amounts of money for people.

    ...but you ask me a math problem, I freak.

    Husband can give you an answer in about 4 seconds...at his worse...7.....
    I've often wondered if there's a gender gap in math skills. I used to tutor math, and generally my female students seemed to be a little less confident than my male students. I'd like to see more women working in math-related fields like engineering and finance, and if we can overcome any cultural biases against women in math, then we should be able to accomplish that goal.

    Jagella
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  29. #28  
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    The answer is surely the same as the answer to the question, "How do you become an Olympic champion?" Choose the right parents.
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  30. #29  
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    Quote Originally Posted by merumario View Post
    .... Common jυѕт try stuff like that.
    That should be "c'mon" ("come on"), not "common."

    Sorry to be nit-picky.
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  31. #30  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    I can balance a 4 million dollar account (not mine).
    When I was in college I majored in accounting and business administration. The accounting I studied along with taxation and finance was challenging. It sounds like you have some respectable skills if you can handle large amounts of money for people.

    ...but you ask me a math problem, I freak.

    Husband can give you an answer in about 4 seconds...at his worse...7.....
    I've often wondered if there's a gender gap in math skills. I used to tutor math, and generally my female students seemed to be a little less confident than my male students. I'd like to see more women working in math-related fields like engineering and finance, and if we can overcome any cultural biases against women in math, then we should be able to accomplish that goal.

    Jagella
    Frankly, I had a teacher tell me, you are getting straight A's.....why are you so AFRAID of Math? I really don't know!
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Frankly, I had a teacher tell me, you are getting straight A's.....why are you so AFRAID of Math? I really don't know!
    Were you afraid that you might be less than perfect? I received all A's in my courses too except for typing. I got a C in that class! Anyway, I was trying very hard to get all A's, and I was afraid that I wouldn't achieve that goal.

    Jagella
    Last edited by Jagella; July 30th, 2013 at 10:59 AM.
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  33. #32  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    I've often wondered if there's a gender gap in math skills.
    Someone else can probably clarify this or point out that I'm completely wrong, but I've heard that there was a pedagogy shift in regards to math. It is being taught in a manner which benefits women over men (the shift came from a previous gender gap which benefited men).

    I have nothing to support that, it was just something I remember hearing from a professor.
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  34. #33  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Someone else can probably clarify this or point out that I'm completely wrong, but I've heard that there was a pedagogy shift in regards to math. It is being taught in a manner which benefits women over men (the shift came from a previous gender gap which benefited men).
    I don't know if I agree with benefiting anybody over anybody else. Math education should be equally available to all regardless of gender.

    Jagella
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  35. #34  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Frankly, I had a teacher tell me, you are getting straight A's.....why are you so AFRAID of Math? I really don't know!
    Were you afraid that you might be less than perfect? I received all A's in my courses too except for typing. I got a C in that class! Anyway, I was trying very hard to get all A's, and I was afraid that I wouldn't achieve that goal.

    Jagella
    Straight "A" student and advanced placement student at the JC both my junior and senior HS years. Also was touring full time, on the road.....doing both. I think I was so scared of failint, and my parents were so demanding when it came to grades.

    Also...and this is the truth, as a grade and JHS student I went to a parochial school (public high school, I rebelled), and they would call you name in class, (mine had 52 students) and read your grades in front of the entire class. ALL of them. If you got below a C, your hand was slapped with a ruler ......don't think they do that anymore, but it surely aided, I am sure, in my perfectionism.
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    I think the secret to be good at math is having a good teacher. Math uses the axiomatic method, meaning you can use what you know from previous lessons to prove what the next lesson teaches. For example, my geometry teacher had my whole class prove every form of CPCTC (corresponding parts of congruent triangles are congruent) as classwork before ever mentioning CPCTC. Later, we used CPCTC to prove the next lesson, forming a cycle. Whenever I forgot something during a test, I could always re-derive it.

    I would try to find a teacher that could help you derive the formulas and theories. That way, you would understand the material better and learn how a mathematician thinks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jewish-Scientist View Post
    I think the secret to be good at math is having a good teacher. Math uses the axiomatic method, meaning you can use what you know from previous lessons to prove what the next lesson teaches. For example, my geometry teacher had my whole class prove every form of CPCTC (corresponding parts of congruent triangles are congruent) as classwork before ever mentioning CPCTC. Later, we used CPCTC to prove the next lesson, forming a cycle. Whenever I forgot something during a test, I could always re-derive it.

    I would try to find a teacher that could help you derive the formulas and theories. That way, you would understand the material better and learn how a mathematician thinks.
    I did not pursue math.....or science....wasn't my passion, musical and comedic theatre was.

    However. I did work at a few accounting jobs where I was in charge of rather very very large budgets to balance and account for, and for some reason had no problem.

    I think sometimes we block, what we aren't comfortable with academically. The only C I ever got in a class was a C- in Algebra...and I think he was nice to me because he KNEW I was a total basket case in class.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Straight "A" student and advanced placement student at the JC both my junior and senior HS years. Also was touring full time, on the road.....doing both. I think I was so scared of failint, and my parents were so demanding when it came to grades.

    Also...and this is the truth, as a grade and JHS student I went to a parochial school (public high school, I rebelled), and they would call you name in class, (mine had 52 students) and read your grades in front of the entire class. ALL of them. If you got below a C, your hand was slapped with a ruler ......don't think they do that anymore, but it surely aided, I am sure, in my perfectionism.
    It looks like you're doing very well. You're smart and good looking too!

    Jagella
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Straight "A" student and advanced placement student at the JC both my junior and senior HS years. Also was touring full time, on the road.....doing both. I think I was so scared of failint, and my parents were so demanding when it came to grades.

    Also...and this is the truth, as a grade and JHS student I went to a parochial school (public high school, I rebelled), and they would call you name in class, (mine had 52 students) and read your grades in front of the entire class. ALL of them. If you got below a C, your hand was slapped with a ruler ......don't think they do that anymore, but it surely aided, I am sure, in my perfectionism.


    It looks like you're doing very well. You're smart and good looking too!

    Jagella
    What address am I supposed to send the check?
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  40. #39  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    I've often wondered if there's a gender gap in math skills.
    Someone else can probably clarify this or point out that I'm completely wrong, but I've heard that there was a pedagogy shift in regards to math. It is being taught in a manner which benefits women over men (the shift came from a previous gender gap which benefited men).

    I have nothing to support that, it was just something I remember hearing from a professor.
    I would have debated this vehemiently in the past because my daughter has struggled with algebra so much. She gets it fine when I teach her, but her teachers, which have all been women were horrible, except for hte most recent who apparently has the same teaching style I do.

    But the kid that NF and I help care for, besides our own kids, brought home his math book last year and I was trying to help him with his homework (he is severely autistic, schizophrenic, bipolar, antisocial personality disorder, sociopathic and psychopatic as well as some that I never heard of before meeting him) on working with positive and negative integers. And I kid you not, they were giving examples of how if you have an account and you add a negative amount of money and the negative amount of money is more than the positive previous balance then it would make you FEEL sad and so the sum would be negative. I thought it was the most ridiculous bullshit I had ever seen. So apparently if you don't like the answer then it is negative and if the number makes you happy then it would be a positive number. If that isn't catering to some stereotype of females being totally enslaved to their feelings I don't know what is.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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    What I remember was the notion that story problems, or visualization of mathematical concepts, was developed to benefit women. Men did better with raw numbers, while women did better with imagery.

    Like I said, though, this is just anecdotal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    What address am I supposed to send the check?
    Please send it to:

    Jagella's Fund for Needy Math Nerds
    sqrt(666)^2 Right Triangle Drive
    Nark-A-Meaties, PI ∞

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    What I remember was the notion that story problems, or visualization of mathematical concepts, was developed to benefit women. Men did better with raw numbers, while women did better with imagery.

    Like I said, though, this is just anecdotal.
    I am visual. Do you think that is a distinct female characteristic?

    I don't find that in all my female associates.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    What address am I supposed to send the check?
    Please send it to:

    Jagella's Fund for Needy Math Nerds
    sqrt(666)^2 Right Triangle Drive
    Nark-A-Meaties, PI ∞

    Jagella
    check is in the mail!!!
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    The most common mistake I see when teaching math is students try to memorize the rules instead of putting forth the effort to understand and apply the math concepts. When ever possible draw pictures, models and try to find practical applications to every new concept that comes your way. Most problems have more than one way to solve them, its somewhat fun to compare them (good teachers will do this as well). In time you'll develop a math sense, that intuition--that allows you to derive your own "tricks" without trying to memorize them and have a solid estimate before you start and to find your mistakes when things go wrong.

    As for the pedagogical shift I haven't seen one so much based on gender, as one adopted by too few teachers that are starting to add more practical examples and discovery learning into the classrooms versus the more traditional drilling and memorization (I call it drill and kill with boredom) often completely disconnected from applications they might be learning in the science or welding class down the hall.

    Here in WA state algebra proficiency is the number one class that students fail to complete before graduating high school--it's much the same in other states.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    The most common mistake I see when teaching math is students try to memorize the rules instead of putting forth the effort to understand and apply the math concepts.
    While I agree that understanding the underlying concepts in mathematics is important, of course, getting students to understand is often difficult. If all else fails, memorizing is better than nothing.

    Math education might be better geared toward understanding the concepts. Teachers might wish to spend more time on the underlying ideas and assign homework problems dealing with those concepts.

    Jagella
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    The most common mistake I see when teaching math is students try to memorize the rules instead of putting forth the effort to understand and apply the math concepts.
    While I agree that understanding the underlying concepts in mathematics is important, of course, getting students to understand is often difficult. If all else fails, memorizing is better than nothing.

    Math education might be better geared toward understanding the concepts. Teachers might wish to spend more time on the underlying ideas and assign homework problems dealing with those concepts.

    Jagella
    I can possibly, not always teach you how to sing properly, but you know....though I did a lot of accounting work, and balanced and jiggled a lot of money...(one job, millions) I am freaked about math.

    I can add, subtract, multiply and divide and all that and figure out what is missing in the 4 million dollar budget or the 200,000 budget, but!!!!!!!!!! If you ask me a geometry or algebra question.....I'd freak out.

    My teachers told me YOU KNOW how to do this....we KNOW you do....you have done it....and I frankly can't explain why that setting does that to me.

    Teachers presentations have a lot to do with any academic or arts class frankly.

    They sometimes make it or break it.

    I cannot faul ONE of mine for my lack of comprehension.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post

    My teachers told me YOU KNOW how to do this....we KNOW you do....you have done it....and I frankly can't explain why that setting does that to me.

    Teachers presentations have a lot to do with any academic or arts class frankly.

    They sometimes make it or break it.

    I cannot faul ONE of mine for my lack of comprehension.
    I hear that a lot from people, that they think the teacher makes all the difference. In a sense they do. Almost always I find if a person is struggling with algebra, it's because they didn't learn something right a year or two ago, or a section or two ago. They get all caught up in trying (and failing) to solve the problem in front of them, when really they need to get a better handle on the problem they left behind a section or two ago.

    The trick is just to be so insanely Obsessive Compulsive, that you just plain can't stand to move onto the next section until you've achieved perfection in the section you're on. Either that, or you'll need to find yourself a good remedial tutor at some point.

    People on this forum will be glad to tell you that I'm something of a half wit, and they're right. However I did manage to post perfect scores on all the math related sections of the SAT test in high school, and I took Geometry and Algebra 2 as self guided classes when they were offered that way. It's all just about your foundation. It's like building a pyramid. You can't cut corners on quality, or else you'll end up with a bent pyramid. But if you do things exhaustively all the way, it just keeps being easy.
    Last edited by kojax; August 10th, 2013 at 02:59 PM.
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  49. #48  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post

    My teachers told me YOU KNOW how to do this....we KNOW you do....you have done it....and I frankly can't explain why that setting does that to me.

    Teachers presentations have a lot to do with any academic or arts class frankly.

    They sometimes make it or break it.

    I cannot faul ONE of mine for my lack of comprehension.
    I hear that a lot from people, that they think the teacher makes all the difference. In a sense they do. Almost always I find if a person is struggling with algebra, it's because they didn't learn something right a year or two ago, or a section or two ago. They get all caught up in trying (and failing) to solve the problem in front of them, when really they need to get a better handle on the problem they left behind a section or two ago.

    The trick is just to be so insanely Obsessive Compulsive, that you just plain can't stand to move onto the next section until you've achieved perfection in the section you're on. Either that, or you'll need to find yourself a good remedial tutor at some point.

    People on this forum will be glad to tell you that I'm something of a half wit, and they're right. However I did manage to post perfect scores on all the math related sections of the SAT test in high school, and I took Geometry and Algebra 2 as self guided classes when they were offered that way. It's all just about your foundation. It's like building a pyramid. You can't cut corners on quality, or else you'll end up with a bent pyramid. But if you do things exhaustively all the way, it just keeps being easy.
    I took algebra and geometry in high school but failed algebra two. strangely when I went to college 6 years later after dropping out if high school, I tested into college algebra and passed with a c. But I only attended 2 semesters because of family issues. Then 7 years after that I went back to college again and had to retake algebra 2. It was an online course and used myMathlab. Luckily the way that software is set up, you can redo the assignment over and over and over again until you get it right and it will give you different but similar problems every time. Like kojax suggested I got ocd with it and refused to accept success on a particular lesson until I did the assignment 3 consecutive times without any hints or errors and got a perfect score. I refused to move on to the next lesson until I did. I was better able to learn from the software and textbook than I ever did with a teacher demanding that I learn it the way they want me to. Sometimes you just have to find what method works best for you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post

    My teachers told me YOU KNOW how to do this....we KNOW you do....you have done it....and I frankly can't explain why that setting does that to me.

    Teachers presentations have a lot to do with any academic or arts class frankly.

    They sometimes make it or break it.

    I cannot faul ONE of mine for my lack of comprehension.
    I hear that a lot from people, that they think the teacher makes all the difference. In a sense they do. Almost always I find if a person is struggling with algebra, it's because they didn't learn something right a year or two ago, or a section or two ago. They get all caught up in trying (and failing) to solve the problem in front of them, when really they need to get a better handle on the problem they left behind a section or two ago.

    The trick is just to be so insanely Obsessive Compulsive, that you just plain can't stand to move onto the next section until you've achieved perfection in the section you're on. Either that, or you'll need to find yourself a good remedial tutor at some point.

    People on this forum will be glad to tell you that I'm something of a half wit, and they're right. However I did manage to post perfect scores on all the math related sections of the SAT test in high school, and I took Geometry and Algebra 2 as self guided classes when they were offered that way. It's all just about your foundation. It's like building a pyramid. You can't cut corners on quality, or else you'll end up with a bent pyramid. But if you do things exhaustively all the way, it just keeps being easy.
    I achieved in English, History, even did well in Science, but YIKES MATH!......then again, none of that was my passion. I was in the top 10 not 10% but 10 in my class academically, but my passion was, and is in theatre, and performing both musical and comedic theatre (let me tell you, comedic theatre is MUCH more difficult than ANY other theatre), and singing. I still do all of the former. I never got into film. Lots more money, yes, but, just didn't fulfill my passion for hearing the laughter.
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    Now who is so crazy that he wants to graduate in maths. ARTS help you enjoy life and offer an enriching experience.
    If you ask me:Math needs mental energy.It is something you can do when you are young.Exception(Paul Erdos).
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    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    Now who is so crazy that he wants to graduate in maths. ARTS help you enjoy life and offer an enriching experience.
    If you ask me:Math needs mental energy.It is something you can do when you are young.Exception(Paul Erdos).
    I like both math and art. In fact, the two disciplines overlap a lot. Both are visually appealing.

    Jagella
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  53. #52  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    Now who is so crazy that he wants to graduate in maths. ARTS help you enjoy life and offer an enriching experience.
    If you ask me:Math needs mental energy.It is something you can do when you are young.Exception(Paul Erdos).
    I like both math and art. In fact, the two disciplines overlap a lot. Both are visually appealing.

    Jagella
    I find a lot of geometrical art to be stunning... lol I said stunning, sounds so uppity. I kill me sometimes.

    But I really do like geometrical art. And I especially like the geometrical shapes found in nature, like snowflakes.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    Now who is so crazy that he wants to graduate in maths. ARTS help you enjoy life and offer an enriching experience.
    If you ask me:Math needs mental energy.It is something you can do when you are young.Exception(Paul Erdos).
    Someone who's passion is number! I think it's wonderful! Just not my cup of coffee.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    Now who is so crazy that he wants to graduate in maths. ARTS help you enjoy life and offer an enriching experience.
    If you ask me:Math needs mental energy.It is something you can do when you are young.Exception(Paul Erdos).
    I like both math and art. In fact, the two disciplines overlap a lot. Both are visually appealing.

    Jagella
    Actually there is a lot of Math in theatre and in music. It's just a different type. One should appreciate both.

    The world is made up of many diverse people, with different passions. Isn't that what makes it special?
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    The world is made up of many diverse people, with different passions. Isn't that what makes it special?
    Yes, but that's also why there's so much fighting. As you can see, I'm a lover and not a fighter.

    Can you learn to love math rather than fight it, babe?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    The world is made up of many diverse people, with different passions. Isn't that what makes it special?
    Yes, but that's also why there's so much fighting. As you can see, I'm a lover and not a fighter.

    Can you learn to love math rather than fight it, babe?

    Jagella
    I am a redhead. We have a temper, we are both lovers and "don't **** me off kind of people. BOTH of my kids are redheads. Daughter is a lot like her Mom, in standing her ground (when warranted) , and son is a quieter version in some ways but has my wicked humor.

    I have balanced a 4 million dollar budget for a college! *L*....I CAN do math, but it is not my passion, so therefore I cannot answer your question.

    Can you sing a light opera?

    Can you do a comedic play......

    Can you have all the theatre lights fail and continue a show with a flashlight.......*laughing*

    Diversitiy does make that wonderful bowl of chicken soup. SO many flavors and so delightful when we touch on each ingredient and learn it's individual value.

    I know....that was neither scientific or mathetmatical. It was, however.....THEATRE!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jagella View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    The world is made up of many diverse people, with different passions. Isn't that what makes it special?
    Yes, but that's also why there's so much fighting. As you can see, I'm a lover and not a fighter.

    Can you learn to love math rather than fight it, babe?

    Jagella
    I am a redhead. We have a temper, we are both lovers and "don't **** me off kind of people. BOTH of my kids are redheads. Daughter is a lot like her Mom, in standing her ground (when warranted) , and son is a quieter version in some ways but has my wicked humor.

    I have balanced a 4 million dollar budget for a college! *L*....I CAN do math, but it is not my passion, so therefore I cannot answer your question.

    Can you sing a light opera?

    Can you do a comedic play......

    Can you have all the theatre lights fail and continue a show with a flashlight.......*laughing*

    Diversitiy does make that wonderful bowl of chicken soup. SO many flavors and so delightful when we touch on each ingredient and learn it's individual value.

    I know....that was neither scientific or mathetmatical. It was, however.....THEATRE!!
    You mean theatrical? I agree. Because red hair has nothing to do with temperament, personality, or ability. lol.

    Passion is motivation though and sometimes that is all a person is lacking in order to achieve success in an endeavor. But it still requires more than just passion. There is still much to be learned about hereditary personality traits and whether or not it is nature or nurture.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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    Quote Originally Posted by anticorncob28 View Post
    My answer is to practice it and get better. Question: what's the angle between the hands of a clock at 5:15? Use your logic with that, and you can find a formula to find the angle at any a:b time. Look at proofs for theorems and try to prove them yourself.
    I'm not good at math and I don't have much time to work with it. But, shouldn't the answer be 60°? I did it in my head, like, in 10 seconds, it's easy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mark~M~ View Post
    But, shouldn't the answer be 60°? I did it in my head, like, in 10 seconds, it's easy.
    In order: no and not that easy.

    Quote Originally Posted by anticorncob28 View Post
    Question: what's the angle between the hands of a clock at 5:15?
    One hand will be at the 90 degree position (the minute hand pointing to the "3" - for 15 minutes past) and the other will be slightly past the "5" (i.e. it will be 1/4 of the way between 5 & 6).
    Therefore, simply: one hand at 90 deg and the other at (5.25/12)x360 = 157.5 degrees, giving the angle between them as (157.5-90) = 67.5 degrees.

    I bet you completely forgot that the hour hand won't be exactly on the 5 any more, didn't you?
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    Yeah, I just realized that the clock hand doesn't stand exactly at an hour and recalculated it myself.
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    Or, since this is about "tricks" to be good at maths, and to show that there's more than one way to skin a cat.
    The two hands are two numbers apart 3 to 5. That's two twelfths of the whole circle or 1/6 of 360 deg. That's 60 degrees.
    And the hour hand is an extra 1/4 of the way further, so that's 1/4 of 1/12 or 1/4 of 30 degrees = 7.5 degrees.
    Total 67.5o.
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    To add to what many have said, I think that to be good at math takes a combination of practice, logical thinking, and little tricks... but also, as was mentioned, a good teacher!

    The main thing to remember is that math, like any language, requires repetition and practice in order to achieve fluency. Not everything will make sense right away, you have to work with it and let it sink in for a while. It has been helpful for me to think about problems right before bed, often my sleeping mind has made sense of them and I have awakened understanding them.

    Formulas are your friends. They really are. Each individual piece of a formula means something, and when you memorize and understand a formula you have a tool that can help you solve not only the component parts of a problem, but also one that will most likely help you solve even more complex problems in the future. Like each word in a sentence contributes to the meaning, each part of a formula has a meaning of its own, which contributes to the meaning of the whole formula.

    The one thing that makes it hardest to learn math is feeling intimidated or afraid of it. It's OK to not understand, it's OK to ask questions, and it's OK to get things wrong. That's part of the process.

    I think that most people can be good at math. Not great at math... that takes passion as well as aptitude and hard work. But good; at least, good enough. I was afraid of math but when I decided to go to college I knew I had no choice, particularly if I wanted to pursue a science. I started at the most basic math, put my best effort into it, and found, to my surprise, that I did quite well. That really helped bolster my confidence, so that I was able to ask questions, take risks, and even help others as my education progressed. I actually was sad when I finished my required math classes, as they were really fun and, unlike all other classes, quite straightforward; there are no trick questions in math, and no inconsistencies. It is perfectly consistent and cohesive, and requires of you nothing more than having the vocabulary and understanding the processes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    To add to what many have said, I think that to be good at math takes a combination of practice, logical thinking, and little tricks... but also, as was mentioned, a good teacher!

    The main thing to remember is that math, like any language, requires repetition and practice in order to achieve fluency. Not everything will make sense right away, you have to work with it and let it sink in for a while. It has been helpful for me to think about problems right before bed, often my sleeping mind has made sense of them and I have awakened understanding them.

    Formulas are your friends. They really are. Each individual piece of a formula means something, and when you memorize and understand a formula you have a tool that can help you solve not only the component parts of a problem, but also one that will most likely help you solve even more complex problems in the future. Like each word in a sentence contributes to the meaning, each part of a formula has a meaning of its own, which contributes to the meaning of the whole formula.

    The one thing that makes it hardest to learn math is feeling intimidated or afraid of it. It's OK to not understand, it's OK to ask questions, and it's OK to get things wrong. That's part of the process.

    I think that most people can be good at math. Not great at math... that takes passion as well as aptitude and hard work. But good; at least, good enough. I was afraid of math but when I decided to go to college I knew I had no choice, particularly if I wanted to pursue a science. I started at the most basic math, put my best effort into it, and found, to my surprise, that I did quite well. That really helped bolster my confidence, so that I was able to ask questions, take risks, and even help others as my education progressed. I actually was sad when I finished my required math classes, as they were really fun and, unlike all other classes, quite straightforward; there are no trick questions in math, and no inconsistencies. It is perfectly consistent and cohesive, and requires of you nothing more than having the vocabulary and understanding the processes.
    I use math in music every day.

    I am just not inclined to other maths's....I can do math....easy...balance a huge budget...but I do not like math..and I am married to a numbers guy and I do understand some of this numbers...and when I don't..

    I simply ask.
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    Originally Posted by Jagella I've often wondered if there's a gender gap in math skills.
    Someone else can probably clarify this or point out that I'm completely wrong, but I've heard that there was a pedagogy shift in regards to math. It is being taught in a manner which benefits women over men (the shift came from a previous gender gap which benefited men).

    I have nothing to support that, it was just something I remember hearing from a professor.
    There is an article somewhere about misconceptions about maths (don't remember where it was). One of them was "men are better at maths than women" (I don't personally know anybody who thinks that, but evidentially it's a big myth people believe). They did a study and they did not find any significant, overall gender difference in mathematical ability. They did state that men are more confident in mathematics. When men get stuck on problems, they tend to say things like "I could do it if I really tried" or "I know how to do this, I just forgot the formula", where women just say "I suck at maths and I can't do this". This may be part of the reason the vast majority of famous mathematicians are/were male.
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    I am always a bit puzzled at the widespread notion that males are better at math than females. I was pretty good at math in school, and can well remember all the high school and college math classes I was in where I was the second best student, with the best student being a girl. It was a bit frustrating, as I was perhaps excessively proud of my skills at the time.
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    Cultural memes can be really powerful. For example, there is a significant amount of evidence that men are more emotionally reactive than women, yet we have a very dominant Western cultural meme that women are emotion-driven and men are logic-driven.
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    Quote Originally Posted by danhanegan View Post
    I am always a bit puzzled at the widespread notion that males are better at math than females. I was pretty good at math in school, and can well remember all the high school and college math classes I was in where I was the second best student, with the best student being a girl. It was a bit frustrating, as I was perhaps excessively proud of my skills at the time.
    Had to laugh at "first being a girl" Dang you boys....ya hate it when we mess with you!

    That you were SECOND Or in the top ten, male or female....frankly....You should be proud, sir!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Cultural memes can be really powerful. For example, there is a significant amount of evidence that men are more emotionally reactive than women, yet we have a very dominant Western cultural meme that women are emotion-driven and men are logic-driven.
    I have no doubt I am emotional, and my husband shows little emotion if any. I think doing theatre makes me search those out for roles.....the fun, the silly, the slutty, the, happy, the sad, the torn, the destroyed.

    I have seen him show emotions twice in our married life. Once when I lost our second child and they wheeled me into the ER.......(we'd had a major blow up the night before....redhead Slovenian and Viking sometimes makes for a rape and plunder scenario....and the second....very very very and I mean a splt second...at his only brother's memorial...(ours are like immediate family only and if it takes more than 15 minutes they're going to come back and haunt us)

    I can't speak for all men...just the one I happen to have for a pet....he is a internalizer...meaning he has so much pressure he keeps it all in and then when he blows it is over something stupid and he's like one of my canning pressure cookers! BOOM!

    I know many men who are emotional.

    I also think it has to do with how you were raise.

    Again. My opinion.
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    and sorry possibly off topic as it was math..but was responding to the comment by Nisslbody!

    Mea culpa....I'll even cook the noodles.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Cultural memes can be really powerful. For example, there is a significant amount of evidence that men are more emotionally reactive than women, yet we have a very dominant Western cultural meme that women are emotion-driven and men are logic-driven.
    I have no doubt I am emotional, and my husband shows little emotion if any. I think doing theatre makes me search those out for roles.....the fun, the silly, the slutty, the, happy, the sad, the torn, the destroyed.

    I have seen him show emotions twice in our married life. Once when I lost our second child and they wheeled me into the ER.......(we'd had a major blow up the night before....redhead Slovenian and Viking sometimes makes for a rape and plunder scenario....and the second....very very very and I mean a splt second...at his only brother's memorial...(ours are like immediate family only and if it takes more than 15 minutes they're going to come back and haunt us)

    I can't speak for all men...just the one I happen to have for a pet....he is a internalizer...meaning he has so much pressure he keeps it all in and then when he blows it is over something stupid and he's like one of my canning pressure cookers! BOOM!

    I know many men who are emotional.

    I also think it has to do with how you were raise.

    Again. My opinion.
    Well, both nature and nurture play a role, of course. Anecdotally speaking (which means nothing, really, but can be fun to relate) I am less emotional and more logical, while my 6'3" Nordic darling is a reactive tower of feels... which is part of why I'm in science and he's in theater. He's really good at emoting.

    But there are a few studies I read last year (I'll need to dredge them up) that indicate that men are not only more emotionally reactive, but that they rate women as being more emotionally reactive, in a sort of projection of their own feelings. Perhaps that's the origin of that meme.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Cultural memes can be really powerful. For example, there is a significant amount of evidence that men are more emotionally reactive than women, yet we have a very dominant Western cultural meme that women are emotion-driven and men are logic-driven.
    I have no doubt I am emotional, and my husband shows little emotion if any. I think doing theatre makes me search those out for roles.....the fun, the silly, the slutty, the, happy, the sad, the torn, the destroyed.

    I have seen him show emotions twice in our married life. Once when I lost our second child and they wheeled me into the ER.......(we'd had a major blow up the night before....redhead Slovenian and Viking sometimes makes for a rape and plunder scenario....and the second....very very very and I mean a splt second...at his only brother's memorial...(ours are like immediate family only and if it takes more than 15 minutes they're going to come back and haunt us)

    I can't speak for all men...just the one I happen to have for a pet....he is a internalizer...meaning he has so much pressure he keeps it all in and then when he blows it is over something stupid and he's like one of my canning pressure cookers! BOOM!

    I know many men who are emotional.

    I also think it has to do with how you were raise.

    Again. My opinion.
    Well, both nature and nurture play a role, of course. Anecdotally speaking (which means nothing, really, but can be fun to relate) I am less emotional and more logical, while my 6'3" Nordic darling is a reactive tower of feels... which is part of why I'm in science and he's in theater. He's really good at emoting.

    But there are a few studies I read last year (I'll need to dredge them up) that indicate that men are not only more emotionally reactive, but that they rate women as being more emotionally reactive, in a sort of projection of their own feelings. Perhaps that's the origin of that meme.
    Holy bat **** you have a VIKING TOO? Dang....

    don't know if I'd agree with that study......life experience has shown me that it's kind of a hit and miss with emotions.....and an observation, on my part is that men from the East Coast are very closed....and men from the West more open...I can't speak of Midwest because I have spend little time there....Hawai'ian men are VERY vocal..and also known to be abusive.

    I find my Viking passive aggressive in that he internalizes than I bump into a chair and he blows. After years of experience...I now walk way and don't speak to him for about three days.....and then he knows (which he already did) that he was out of line and if I am not speaking to him, at all, and I mean AT ALL.....total silence. except for please and thank you....that he is in shit creek so deep that he better get his waders on and bring me a freaking fish....tempers and reheads, and yes, studies do show we do have some "different tendencies".

    I have never worked with a Norwegian actors! Honestly! EVER! WOW..they exist...they must have Slovenian in them somewhere *laughing*
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    Forum Sophomore Nisslbody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Cultural memes can be really powerful. For example, there is a significant amount of evidence that men are more emotionally reactive than women, yet we have a very dominant Western cultural meme that women are emotion-driven and men are logic-driven.
    I have no doubt I am emotional, and my husband shows little emotion if any. I think doing theatre makes me search those out for roles.....the fun, the silly, the slutty, the, happy, the sad, the torn, the destroyed.

    I have seen him show emotions twice in our married life. Once when I lost our second child and they wheeled me into the ER.......(we'd had a major blow up the night before....redhead Slovenian and Viking sometimes makes for a rape and plunder scenario....and the second....very very very and I mean a splt second...at his only brother's memorial...(ours are like immediate family only and if it takes more than 15 minutes they're going to come back and haunt us)

    I can't speak for all men...just the one I happen to have for a pet....he is a internalizer...meaning he has so much pressure he keeps it all in and then when he blows it is over something stupid and he's like one of my canning pressure cookers! BOOM!

    I know many men who are emotional.

    I also think it has to do with how you were raise.

    Again. My opinion.
    Well, both nature and nurture play a role, of course. Anecdotally speaking (which means nothing, really, but can be fun to relate) I am less emotional and more logical, while my 6'3" Nordic darling is a reactive tower of feels... which is part of why I'm in science and he's in theater. He's really good at emoting.

    But there are a few studies I read last year (I'll need to dredge them up) that indicate that men are not only more emotionally reactive, but that they rate women as being more emotionally reactive, in a sort of projection of their own feelings. Perhaps that's the origin of that meme.
    Holy bat **** you have a VIKING TOO? Dang....

    don't know if I'd agree with that study......life experience has shown me that it's kind of a hit and miss with emotions.....and an observation, on my part is that men from the East Coast are very closed....and men from the West more open...I can't speak of Midwest because I have spend little time there....Hawai'ian men are VERY vocal..and also known to be abusive.

    I find my Viking passive aggressive in that he internalizes than I bump into a chair and he blows. After years of experience...I now walk way and don't speak to him for about three days.....and then he knows (which he already did) that he was out of line and if I am not speaking to him, at all, and I mean AT ALL.....total silence. except for please and thank you....that he is in shit creek so deep that he better get his waders on and bring me a freaking fish....tempers and reheads, and yes, studies do show we do have some "different tendencies".

    I have never worked with a Norwegian actors! Honestly! EVER! WOW..they exist...they must have Slovenian in them somewhere *laughing*
    Hahaha!

    Mine is more of a soulful, sensitive thespian Viking than an explosive one.

    I'm about half Nordic myself (rather offset by the African and Native other half) and sometimes he likes to refer to me as "The Littlest Viking". But I'm definitely neither as sensitive or emotional as he is... though, with such a small sample, my observations aren't generalizable at all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Cultural memes can be really powerful. For example, there is a significant amount of evidence that men are more emotionally reactive than women, yet we have a very dominant Western cultural meme that women are emotion-driven and men are logic-driven.
    I have no doubt I am emotional, and my husband shows little emotion if any. I think doing theatre makes me search those out for roles.....the fun, the silly, the slutty, the, happy, the sad, the torn, the destroyed.

    I have seen him show emotions twice in our married life. Once when I lost our second child and they wheeled me into the ER.......(we'd had a major blow up the night before....redhead Slovenian and Viking sometimes makes for a rape and plunder scenario....and the second....very very very and I mean a splt second...at his only brother's memorial...(ours are like immediate family only and if it takes more than 15 minutes they're going to come back and haunt us)

    I can't speak for all men...just the one I happen to have for a pet....he is a internalizer...meaning he has so much pressure he keeps it all in and then when he blows it is over something stupid and he's like one of my canning pressure cookers! BOOM!

    I know many men who are emotional.

    I also think it has to do with how you were raise.

    Again. My opinion.
    Well, both nature and nurture play a role, of course. Anecdotally speaking (which means nothing, really, but can be fun to relate) I am less emotional and more logical, while my 6'3" Nordic darling is a reactive tower of feels... which is part of why I'm in science and he's in theater. He's really good at emoting.

    But there are a few studies I read last year (I'll need to dredge them up) that indicate that men are not only more emotionally reactive, but that they rate women as being more emotionally reactive, in a sort of projection of their own feelings. Perhaps that's the origin of that meme.
    Holy bat **** you have a VIKING TOO? Dang....

    don't know if I'd agree with that study......life experience has shown me that it's kind of a hit and miss with emotions.....and an observation, on my part is that men from the East Coast are very closed....and men from the West more open...I can't speak of Midwest because I have spend little time there....Hawai'ian men are VERY vocal..and also known to be abusive.

    I find my Viking passive aggressive in that he internalizes than I bump into a chair and he blows. After years of experience...I now walk way and don't speak to him for about three days.....and then he knows (which he already did) that he was out of line and if I am not speaking to him, at all, and I mean AT ALL.....total silence. except for please and thank you....that he is in shit creek so deep that he better get his waders on and bring me a freaking fish....tempers and reheads, and yes, studies do show we do have some "different tendencies".

    I have never worked with a Norwegian actors! Honestly! EVER! WOW..they exist...they must have Slovenian in them somewhere *laughing*
    Hahaha!

    Mine is more of a soulful, sensitive thespian Viking than an explosive one.

    I'm about half Nordic myself (rather offset by the African and Native other half) and sometimes he likes to refer to me as "The Littlest Viking". But I'm definitely neither as sensitive or emotional as he is... though, with such a small sample, my observations aren't generalizable at all.
    Have you been to Norway?

    Sorry Mods off subject.
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    Forum Sophomore Nisslbody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Cultural memes can be really powerful. For example, there is a significant amount of evidence that men are more emotionally reactive than women, yet we have a very dominant Western cultural meme that women are emotion-driven and men are logic-driven.
    I have no doubt I am emotional, and my husband shows little emotion if any. I think doing theatre makes me search those out for roles.....the fun, the silly, the slutty, the, happy, the sad, the torn, the destroyed.

    I have seen him show emotions twice in our married life. Once when I lost our second child and they wheeled me into the ER.......(we'd had a major blow up the night before....redhead Slovenian and Viking sometimes makes for a rape and plunder scenario....and the second....very very very and I mean a splt second...at his only brother's memorial...(ours are like immediate family only and if it takes more than 15 minutes they're going to come back and haunt us)

    I can't speak for all men...just the one I happen to have for a pet....he is a internalizer...meaning he has so much pressure he keeps it all in and then when he blows it is over something stupid and he's like one of my canning pressure cookers! BOOM!

    I know many men who are emotional.

    I also think it has to do with how you were raise.

    Again. My opinion.
    Well, both nature and nurture play a role, of course. Anecdotally speaking (which means nothing, really, but can be fun to relate) I am less emotional and more logical, while my 6'3" Nordic darling is a reactive tower of feels... which is part of why I'm in science and he's in theater. He's really good at emoting.

    But there are a few studies I read last year (I'll need to dredge them up) that indicate that men are not only more emotionally reactive, but that they rate women as being more emotionally reactive, in a sort of projection of their own feelings. Perhaps that's the origin of that meme.
    Holy bat **** you have a VIKING TOO? Dang....

    don't know if I'd agree with that study......life experience has shown me that it's kind of a hit and miss with emotions.....and an observation, on my part is that men from the East Coast are very closed....and men from the West more open...I can't speak of Midwest because I have spend little time there....Hawai'ian men are VERY vocal..and also known to be abusive.

    I find my Viking passive aggressive in that he internalizes than I bump into a chair and he blows. After years of experience...I now walk way and don't speak to him for about three days.....and then he knows (which he already did) that he was out of line and if I am not speaking to him, at all, and I mean AT ALL.....total silence. except for please and thank you....that he is in shit creek so deep that he better get his waders on and bring me a freaking fish....tempers and reheads, and yes, studies do show we do have some "different tendencies".

    I have never worked with a Norwegian actors! Honestly! EVER! WOW..they exist...they must have Slovenian in them somewhere *laughing*
    Hahaha!

    Mine is more of a soulful, sensitive thespian Viking than an explosive one.

    I'm about half Nordic myself (rather offset by the African and Native other half) and sometimes he likes to refer to me as "The Littlest Viking". But I'm definitely neither as sensitive or emotional as he is... though, with such a small sample, my observations aren't generalizable at all.
    Have you been to Norway?

    Sorry Mods off subject.
    Nope, though my best friend got to go last winter. So envious!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Cultural memes can be really powerful. For example, there is a significant amount of evidence that men are more emotionally reactive than women, yet we have a very dominant Western cultural meme that women are emotion-driven and men are logic-driven.
    I have no doubt I am emotional, and my husband shows little emotion if any. I think doing theatre makes me search those out for roles.....the fun, the silly, the slutty, the, happy, the sad, the torn, the destroyed.

    I have seen him show emotions twice in our married life. Once when I lost our second child and they wheeled me into the ER.......(we'd had a major blow up the night before....redhead Slovenian and Viking sometimes makes for a rape and plunder scenario....and the second....very very very and I mean a splt second...at his only brother's memorial...(ours are like immediate family only and if it takes more than 15 minutes they're going to come back and haunt us)

    I can't speak for all men...just the one I happen to have for a pet....he is a internalizer...meaning he has so much pressure he keeps it all in and then when he blows it is over something stupid and he's like one of my canning pressure cookers! BOOM!

    I know many men who are emotional.

    I also think it has to do with how you were raise.

    Again. My opinion.
    Well, both nature and nurture play a role, of course. Anecdotally speaking (which means nothing, really, but can be fun to relate) I am less emotional and more logical, while my 6'3" Nordic darling is a reactive tower of feels... which is part of why I'm in science and he's in theater. He's really good at emoting.

    But there are a few studies I read last year (I'll need to dredge them up) that indicate that men are not only more emotionally reactive, but that they rate women as being more emotionally reactive, in a sort of projection of their own feelings. Perhaps that's the origin of that meme.
    Holy bat **** you have a VIKING TOO? Dang....

    don't know if I'd agree with that study......life experience has shown me that it's kind of a hit and miss with emotions.....and an observation, on my part is that men from the East Coast are very closed....and men from the West more open...I can't speak of Midwest because I have spend little time there....Hawai'ian men are VERY vocal..and also known to be abusive.

    I find my Viking passive aggressive in that he internalizes than I bump into a chair and he blows. After years of experience...I now walk way and don't speak to him for about three days.....and then he knows (which he already did) that he was out of line and if I am not speaking to him, at all, and I mean AT ALL.....total silence. except for please and thank you....that he is in shit creek so deep that he better get his waders on and bring me a freaking fish....tempers and reheads, and yes, studies do show we do have some "different tendencies".

    I have never worked with a Norwegian actors! Honestly! EVER! WOW..they exist...they must have Slovenian in them somewhere *laughing*
    Hahaha!

    Mine is more of a soulful, sensitive thespian Viking than an explosive one.

    I'm about half Nordic myself (rather offset by the African and Native other half) and sometimes he likes to refer to me as "The Littlest Viking". But I'm definitely neither as sensitive or emotional as he is... though, with such a small sample, my observations aren't generalizable at all.
    Have you been to Norway?

    Sorry Mods off subject.
    Nope, though my best friend got to go last winter. So envious!
    Went in 1995. Husband's family from Mandal. I hated the food! *laughing* but it is really beautiful!
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