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  1. #1 pi? 
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    How was pi calculated??
    i got

    (select)(1/2^computational complexity)

    ps 1/2 =diameter
    the maths is easy getting there
    not so much
    please note using pi
    if you swap past zero
    add one to minus and take 1 from plus
    so 22/7 -22/7
    technically its -21999999 hence...


    Last edited by fiveworlds; January 16th, 2013 at 09:22 PM.
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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    How was pi calculated??
    i got

    (select)(1/2^computational complexity)

    ps 1/2 =diameter
    Pi is the number

    It also happens to occur frequently in physics and mathematics, most specifically it is the ratio between any circle's diameter and its circumference.


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    thanks
    Last edited by fiveworlds; January 17th, 2013 at 12:04 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    How was pi calculated??
    There are many ways of calculating Pi, for example:

    There are also algorithms which will allow you to generate a given digit without working out all the preceding digits. These can be used to double-check the results of programs which generate many digits.

    Wikipedia has a good summary: Pi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    i got

    (select)(1/2^computational complexity)

    ps 1/2 =diameter
    the maths is easy getting there
    not so much
    please note using pi
    if you swap past zero
    add one to minus and take 1 from plus
    so 22/7 -22/7
    technically its -21999999 hence...
    Huh?
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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  6. #5  
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    i have been looking at it and i think at best we will only ever really aproximate a circle by drawing experiment etc. The only real circle i can think of is absolute zero
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    i have been looking at it and i think at best we will only ever really aproximate a circle by drawing experiment etc. The only real circle i can think of is absolute zero
    Absolute zero is a temperature. How does that relate to circles?

    Of course we can never create a perfect circle (or a perfect square, or anything). It is a mathematical abstraction. And I'm not sure what that has to do with Pi, particularly. But note "thirty-nine digits are sufficient to perform most cosmological calculations, because that is the accuracy necessary to calculate the volume of the known universe with a precision of one atom" (from the Wikipedia page).
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    well the relation being that a perfect circle would only occur both when all waveforms around it are linear and they cancel each other out exactly by destructive interference. ill see if i can find the 39 digits as 2^n
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    well the relation being that a perfect circle would only occur both when all waveforms around it are linear and they cancel each other out exactly by destructive interference.
    I don't know what that means!

    ill see if i can find the 39 digits as 2^n
    Can you explain how 2^n relates to Pi? (Apart from being somewhere between 2^1 and 2^2) Or 39 digits? (apart from the fact that 39 is between 2^5 and 2^6). I am really puzzled by what you are getting at there...
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    well its binary as you look closer at a circle you take tangents to find the slope the 1/2^n finds the points for you to the complexity you need so convert your 39 digits as a 2^whatever to find every possible tangent of the circle and place these into the distance formula to find circumference
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    well its binary as you look closer at a circle you take tangents to find the slope the 1/2^n finds the points for you to the complexity you need so convert your 39 digits as a 2^whatever to find every possible tangent of the circle and place these into the distance formula to find circumference
    Er .... maybe I see what you mean. Is this something you worked out yourself? Or is it a known technique? It sounds similar to the polygon approximation technique (doubling the number sides at each step)?
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    thats it i looked at it idea is that theselect(1/2^n) will find each point of the set P1 to Pkand find the distances between each point.run longer equals more accurate.i wanted to resolve to h but im not really surepossible but i dont know the ? part1/(2^n)(?)finished pi2C=d(1/2^n) dist and allow for %error

    C=r(1/2^n)

    C/D=(1/2^n)/2
    Last edited by fiveworlds; January 17th, 2013 at 02:23 PM.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    thats it i looked at it idea is that theselect(1/2^n) will find each point of the set P1 to Pkand find the distances between each point.run longer equals more accurate.i wanted to resolve to h but im not really surepossible but i dont know the ? part1/(2^n)(?)finished pi2C=d(1/2^n) dist and allow for %error

    C=r(1/2^n)

    C/D=(1/2^n)/2
    I think you need to work on communication skills and explain your idea.
    What does select mean?
    What is n?
    What is P1?
    What is Pk?
    What is h?
    What is pi2C?
    What is d?
    what is dist?
    What is C?
    What is D?

    I have no idea what you are trying to calculate or how.
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  14. #13  
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    just pi?

    hmm can this be done by construction??
    bored
    resolving central squares problem

    so p!=np
    because there is no simple way to solve a circles circumference
    if i gave you a list of distances you can add
    in poly time a*n but you cant solve for the distances
    in poly time. the more accurate the worse it is.
    your accuracy 1/2^n being exponential in itself
    a fractal np list.infinite series
    just to make it harder add the distances of the
    points in your array corresponding to
    Fibonacci you can sort in poly time so np
    still applies
    one would imagine thats it but no..
    if you know the rate of change of runtime with
    each point you can find a converter which will
    force the eqn to run in polynomial time wasting
    time deliberately basically but making it polynomial
    basically make a movie out of it. or maybe you
    could guess the song here

    in which case one could cheat further and say
    that anything takes a*infinity
    to solve which is polynomial
    Last edited by fiveworlds; January 30th, 2013 at 09:27 AM.
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