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Thread: what is fractual maths?

  1. #1 what is fractual maths? 
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    what is fractual maths??


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  3. #2  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
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    Perhaps you mean fractal math. Here is a wiki, and also a very cool video I saw a few years ago:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractal

    http://video.pbs.org/video/1050932219/


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  4. #3 Re:What is fractal maths 
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    Benoit Mandelbrot is generally considered to be the father of fractals. He coined the term fractal to describe curves, surfaces and objects that have some very peculiar properties. You learned in school that simple curves, such as a line, have one dimension. Squares, rectangles, circles, polygons, etc. have two dimensions, while solid objects such as a cube, have three dimensions. The three dimensions define space. Time can be considered a fourth dimension. We normally think of dimensions as integers: 1, 2, 3, . . .

    What is so peculiar about about fractals is that they have fractional dimensions! A fractal curve could have a dimensionality of 1.4332, for example, rather than 1. Fractals are not just a mathematical curiosity. Most natural objects are fractal by nature, and can be best described using fractal mathematics. Clouds, leaves, the blood vessel system, coastlines, particles of lint, etc. have fractal shapes.

    Fractals are generated by an iterative process - doing the same thing again and again. Fractals also have the property that when you magnify them they still look much the same. This is called self-similarity.
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    A fractal is "a rough or fragmented geometric shape that can be split into parts, each of which is (at least approximately) a reduced-size copy of the whole,"[1] a property called self-similarity. Roots of the idea of fractals go back to the 17th century, while mathematically rigorous treatment of fractals can be traced back to functions studied by Karl Weierstrass, Georg Cantor and Felix Hausdorff a century later in studying functions that werecontinuous but not differentiable; however, the term fractal was coined by Benoît Mandelbrot in 1975 and was derived from the Latin fractus meaning "broken" or "fractured." A mathematical fractal is based on an equation that undergoes iteration, a form of feedback based on recursion.[2] There are several examples of fractals, which are defined as portraying exact self-similarity, quasi self-similarity, or statistical self-similarity. While fractals are a mathematical construct, they are found in nature, which has led to their inclusion in artwork. They are useful in medicine, soil mechanics, seismology, and technical analysis.
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    Fractual = fractionally factual. Maths relying on massive speculation and a not-so-solid understanding of simple numbers.


    (everyone else already answered it properly)
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by surya View Post
    A fractal is "a rough or fragmented geometric shape that can be split into parts, each of which is (at least approximately) a reduced-size copy of the whole,"[1] a property called self-similarity. Roots of the idea of fractals go back to the 17th century, while mathematically rigorous treatment of fractals can be traced back to functions studied by Karl Weierstrass, Georg Cantor and Felix Hausdorff a century later in studying functions that werecontinuous but not differentiable; however, the term fractal was coined by Benoît Mandelbrot in 1975 and was derived from the Latin fractus meaning "broken" or "fractured." A mathematical fractal is based on an equation that undergoes iteration, a form of feedback based on recursion.[2] There are several examples of fractals, which are defined as portraying exact self-similarity, quasi self-similarity, or statistical self-similarity. While fractals are a mathematical construct, they are found in nature, which has led to their inclusion in artwork. They are useful in medicine, soil mechanics, seismology, and technical analysis.
    This a blatant copy/paste from Wikipedia. If you have nothing original to say, please at least credit your sources.

    (Bear in mind that all here have access to the Wiki, and do not need you, nor anyone else to quote it verbatim)
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    With only one post, that's probably a spambot advertising the link in the sig.
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    A mathematical fractal is based on an equation that undergoes iteration, a form of feedback based on recursion.[2] There are several examples of fractals, which are defined as portraying exact self-similarity, quasi self-similarity, or statistical self-similarity. While fractals are a mathematical construct, they are found in nature, which has led to their inclusion in artwork. They are useful in medicine, soil mechanics, seismology, and technical analysis.
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