Notices
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Transposition of equation

  1. #1 Transposition of equation 
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    108
    Now, this is basically a physics equation, but since I need only algebraical part of it, I'm posting this here. My physics teacher claims that the equation can be written in form of

    Now, I tried transposing the equation in numerous ways, but never succeeded, and am pretty sure this is not the same equation. Am I correct?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. Leszek Luchowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Gliwice, Poland
    Posts
    807
    Assuming , the first equation transforms into . Which obviously is not equivalent to .

    Your teacher is wrong. Unless of course I made a mistake somewhere.


    Leszek. Pronounced [LEH-sheck]. The wondering Slav.
    History teaches us that we don't learn from history.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 Re: Transposition of equation 
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Sindrato
    Now, this is basically a physics equation, but since I need only algebraical part of it, I'm posting this here. My physics teacher claims that the equation can be written in form of

    Now, I tried transposing the equation in numerous ways, but never succeeded, and am pretty sure this is not the same equation. Am I correct?
    Either you have misquoted your teacher or your teacher is all wet.

    Just consider the simple case then and can be anything according to your first equatin. This is clearly not compatible with the second equation which then reduces to just .
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    97
    I can confirm that this equation can not be rewritten that way.

    Getting rid of the denominators by multiplying both sides with the denominators one can write the first equation as



    while the second equation can be rewritten as



    So, these two equations can't be equal, unless YZ = 0 that is.
    "Complexity is stupidity disguised as intellect."
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Leszek Luchowski
    Assuming , the first equation transforms into . Which obviously is not equivalent to .

    Your teacher is wrong. Unless of course I made a mistake somewhere.
    You did not make a mistake in your transformation.

    However the conclusion that the teacher is wrong may not be valid. The alternative is that the the teacher has been misquoted.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    108
    Teacher has not been misquoted, as the equations were written on the blackboard and double-checked. I am glad that you have confirmed my calculations. The original equations were in fact and . The later is, of course, the Gay-Lussacc's law.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7 Re: Transposition of equation 
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Sindrato
    Now, this is basically a physics equation, but since I need only algebraical part of it, I'm posting this here. My physics teacher claims that the equation can be written in form of

    Now, I tried transposing the equation in numerous ways, but never succeeded, and am pretty sure this is not the same equation. Am I correct?
    Your teacher wasn't far off; the original equation can be simplified to .
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •