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Thread: Infinite nature of Pi

  1. #1 Infinite nature of Pi 
    Forum Sophomore schiz0yd's Avatar
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    is the infinite nature of Pi related in any way to a quantum-scale mathematics involved in a perfect circle? I'm not really sure how to word this the way I want, but I had a thuoght earlier that the fact that Pi cannot be resolved as a fixed number that it must be due to some kind of phenomena of the universe in calculating a perfect circle. since our own understanding of geometry is based on individual dimensions of imaginary points, true curvature is impossible in this context since it would really be a collection of straight lines with angled connections.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is: is it possible that the infinite nature of pi is due to the nature of mathematics at the quantum level? is math even possible at the quantum level, if math is based on fixed values and the quantum world is always variable?

    I'll admit it before someone tells me: I don't really know what I'm talking about here and I'm in over my head, but the nature of Pi is really suspicious to me.


    I prefer to use my right brain to study the universe rather than my left brain.
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  3. #2 Re: Infinite nature of Pi 
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    Quote Originally Posted by schiz0yd
    is the infinite nature of Pi
    Stop right there! The fact that, as far as is known, cannot be represented as a finite string of natural numbers does not alter the fact that it is greater than 3 and less than 4. One writes .

    Since obviously , then is a finite real number; in fact it is transcendental, though the proof is far from easy (to me, at least).

    I'll admit it before someone tells me: I don't really know what I'm talking about here and I'm in over my head, but the nature of Pi is really suspicious to me.
    You are just a little confused, that's all. That's fine here, just ask and all will be provided.......


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  4. #3 Re: Infinite nature of Pi 
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    Quote Originally Posted by schiz0yd
    is the infinite nature of Pi related in any way to a quantum-scale mathematics involved in a perfect circle? I'm not really sure how to word this the way I want, but I had a thuoght earlier that the fact that Pi cannot be resolved as a fixed number that it must be due to some kind of phenomena of the universe in calculating a perfect circle. since our own understanding of geometry is based on individual dimensions of imaginary points, true curvature is impossible in this context since it would really be a collection of straight lines with angled connections.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is: is it possible that the infinite nature of pi is due to the nature of mathematics at the quantum level? is math even possible at the quantum level, if math is based on fixed values and the quantum world is always variable?

    I'll admit it before someone tells me: I don't really know what I'm talking about here and I'm in over my head, but the nature of Pi is really suspicious to me.
    Pi is not infinite.

    Pi is a perfectly well-defined real number, a bit larger than 3. There is nothing infinite about it.

    Pi is not a rational number. In fact pi is not algebraic.

    That nature of pi has nothing to do with quantum mechanics, or even with physics.

    You are barking up the wrong tree.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    Hopefully this won't muddy the waters too much, but pi is the ratio of circumference to diameter in a flat space, and the real world isn't flat (altough it's very close in our daily experiences).
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiMaster
    Hopefully this won't muddy the waters too much, but pi is the ratio of circumference to diameter in a flat space, and the real world isn't flat (altough it's very close in our daily experiences).
    Which has nothing to do with pi.
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  7. #6  
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    DrRocket: please check your PM Inbox
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  8. #7 Re: Infinite nature of Pi 
    Forum Sophomore schiz0yd's Avatar
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    I know that it is not infinite in the way you're thinking, but it seems to have an infinite nature of spawning new numbers when being calculated.

    What causes this to happen?
    I prefer to use my right brain to study the universe rather than my left brain.
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  9. #8 Re: Infinite nature of Pi 
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    Quote Originally Posted by schiz0yd
    I know that it is not infinite in the way you're thinking, but it seems to have an infinite nature of spawning new numbers when being calculated.

    What causes this to happen?
    It is transcendental.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    Pi's not really special in that sense. Most numbers are trancendental. It's just that e and pi come up a lot more often than any other trancendental number, and that most of the numbers people deal with regularly aren't trancendental.
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