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Thread: matrices

  1. #1 matrices 
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    they aren't so much hard, just hard work... especialy when the teacher dosen't feel like explaining why we are doing it,

    { 1 1}
    { 2 3}

    know what i mean???


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  3. #2  
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    Well, what would you like to know about them?


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  4. #3  
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    just what are the main uses,
    so far, (and i think we have finished all we will be doing) they are pointless, just very tedious multiplying,,, can you think of any use in other pre universaty math classes at least??
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  5. #4  
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    Um ... they are probably not going to be very useful to you in anything you do. I think they have some uses in very high level math classes (I'll let you know when I get to them), and in pre-university math classe? um ... well I've gone through all those and that's about it. I assume you are in algebra 2 or something like that? You won't really find them anywehre else.
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  6. #5  
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    ok... your right they are pointless!
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  7. #6  
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    I take it back. You could use a matrix to help you solve something like this (although you don't have to):
    [(x²+3x+1)/(x²+1)²]dx
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  8. #7  
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    You also use them to determine adjacencies and other map organizers. In computer graphics they're used to plot morphs. So yeah, pretty useful. Spreadsheets are matrices.
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  9. #8  
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    Matrices are important. For one thing, you can build a model of the US economy with it. A guy got a Nobel prize with that. Also, if you're in college, they randomly assign you a dorm by using linear algebra (which makes heavy use of matrices) to calculate who gets which dorm. Furthermore, they're used for analysis of non-simple electronic circuits, factoring prime numbers (has to do with encryption), etc etc.

    Saying that matrices are "useless", in essence, is brainless.

    Let's see an example of matrices in one field ... quantum computation. This field of research is working to bring you quantum computers. Yes. The ones that can calculate the factors of extremely, extremely long prime numbers in a mere few seconds. Classical computers have been mathematically proven to take several million years. Why would you be interested? The current way of encrypting anything, from credit card transactions to encrypted messages anywhere, depends on the fact that you can't factor obscenely long prime numbers because it'd take millions of years.

    Now listen up. A brief view into theoretical QC.

    Matrices are absolutely essential in quantum computational physics. You can represent gates that take 1 bits, 2 bits, 3 bits, any number of bits as square matrices.

    For example, if N = the square root of 2 (Can't type it out), then the Hadamard gate, which takes a classical (1 or 0) bit and spits out an entangled state, is expressed as

    H =

    { 1/N 1/N }
    { 1/N -1/N }

    (though it takes any 1 quantum bit ... it can also take an entangled state and unentangle it)

    and bits are expressed as vectors, so manipulation of quantum bits can easily be calculated through matrices.

    Of course, this is all the dirt easy stuff, the unitary stuff. Dealing with anything more than 1 bit at a time gets very, very hairy.

    Implementing this in real life, also, is a bitch. Current models require stable temperatures of several millionths of a Kelvin.

    Don't ask me about how the encryption/prime numbers business works. You'll need to accept the word of a Yale physics professor.
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  10. #9  
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    Or you could just get out your TI83 and plug it in, but to each his own!
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Locke
    Or you could just get out your TI83 and plug it in, but to each his own!
    TI?????????

    In my ridiculous opinion, you're faking it if you aren't using an HP RPN calculator like the 48SX. (the Gs came out after I'd already invested too much in the S and were pretty pricey to boot)

    Of course I had a TI as backup, but it stayed in the book bag 99% of the time.



    OH, and to be relevant: The most obvious and utilitarian use of matrices is to solve systems of linear equations. It's by far the easiest method by hand of solving 3 or more equations.
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  12. #11  
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    matrices are also useful to determine the cross product of two vectors using a 3X2 or maybe a 2X3 i think. i haven't studied matrices yet but have done vector analysis and the method is useful
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  13. #12  
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    you can use matrices in solving simultaneously a system of equations together very easily using the simplix method, Cramer method ,Gauss elimination ,Gauss seidel method or ADI method these are all algorithms that use matrices for solving simultaneously system of equations also they are used in the simplix method for obtaining an Optimal solution of any model with n constraints and m # of variables ...personally when I first took matrices I found them pointless but then I figured out they are very useful in many fields also I took them in the discrete math course .

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