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Thread: Rectangular prism Simulation tool

  1. #1 Rectangular prism Simulation tool 
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    Does anyone know where I can find a tool on the internet that I put the length, width, and height of a rectangular prism in and it shows you a 3d view of the rectangular prism using those values? Perfurably browser intergrated.


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  3. #2 Re: Rectangular prism Simulation tool 
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCrazedDarwinian
    Does anyone know where I can find a tool on the internet that I put the length, width, and height of a rectangular prism in and it shows you a 3d view of the rectangular prism using those values? Perfurably browser intergrated.
    I actually found this amazing online calculator one time that had a graphing tool with it. You could just make up some equations for each face of a rectangular prism you want and then render it. I would suggest investing in something like mathematica though, I know it's not browser based but it has many uses.


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    Well I do have Microsoft Math, But its useless, Unless someone could tell me if a rectangular prism with a length of 20, a width of 20, and a height of 30 has a stable base, Microsoft Math has this graphing tool that talks about cartiosones, or something like that, Which I had no idea what meant, because im working on a design challenge, Which I have pretty much figured it all out, So its not really help, I just need to know if its stable, but the challenge is to design a cereal box that has a volume of 12000cm3, a surface area of the box between 3200cm2 and 4000cm2, and the box has to have a stable base and pleasing proportions, so far, using length of 20, width of 20, and a height of 30, I have the volume at 12000cm3, and the surface area at EXACTLY 3200cm2, Now I just need to know if it has a stable base, And work on the art, But you cant really help me with that, Lol.
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    What do you mean by stable base? Are they saying that it has to withstand so much force at the top of the box and not turn over?

    It is a little confusing to say stable base and then not entail what a stable base is. But looking at your dimensions I can pretty well say that it has a more stable base than a normal cereal box. The height is only 50 percent taller than the base. That is far better if we are talking about not getting knocked over.

    But as I said I don't know what they define to be a stable base. That is a pretty easy competition though. If you have had calculus one and remember Optimization then it would be pretty easy.
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    Well, all they say is that it has to be stable, so im guessing like you cant have a tiny base and a hugh top, because it would collaspe on itself, like a normal pyrimid is stable, but if you put it upside down its not, so thats what they are lookign for, not collapsing on itself, and not to be knocked over.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCrazedDarwinian
    Well, all they say is that it has to be stable, so im guessing like you cant have a tiny base and a hugh top, because it would collaspe on itself, like a normal pyrimid is stable, but if you put it upside down its not, so thats what they are lookign for, not collapsing on itself, and not to be knocked over.
    Well then you answered your own question. Obviously a rectangular prism with a square base as big as yours is going to be stable. Like I said you have already beat the old cereal boxes in stability. I would just be worried that it would take up to much room in a pantry.
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    Alright, 20 by 20 by 30 works fine, now how would I use those numbers to find the caculations i need to create each side of the box, like how would i break it down to find each indivedgeal sides area, I think its area I need, so I can create a net to create my box. You have to accutally create your ceral box.
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  9. #8  
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    well if your volume is xyz = 12000, then your SA(surface area) is going to be 2(xy) +2(xz) +2(yz)= 3200 or whatever measurable properties you want it to have.

    But most box layouts have little flaps that help you connect your box together. Then there is the top of the box which has to be able to close on it's self.
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