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Thread: Teaching Fire Safety

  1. #1 Teaching Fire Safety 
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    I have a theory about how we think and react during emergency situations. I find that children are able to remember a positive response considerable better than remembering a negative response. Instead of trying to teach children all the things they should not do during a house fire we teach the one thing they should do "escape" from the house and "Wait" outside.

    If anyone has ever done any research that supports my theory I would love to read it.

    Dan Phillips

    www.escapeandwait.com

    http://www.escapeandwait.com


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    Forum Ph.D. Wolf's Avatar
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    I dunno. The majority of things I've seen center around preventing natural reactions (such as opening windows) and common problems involved in escaping (grabbing doorknobs barehanded, climbing onto the roof, etc.).

    Although I would have to agree that teaching proper actions in an emergency is better than long chains of things not to do, as far as memory goes, I'm not sure it's related to the types of things being remembered (ie good or bad). I think it more has to do with the amount to be remembered. Children (and even adults) will remember what to do if they are given only a few instructions, rather than a lot. So, rather than flood the brains of the children with things not to do, it would be better to give them a short list of things TO do.

    Then of course there's the fact that children seem to remember things best when there's a bit of trauma associated with it. However, I doubt you'd be able to convince the general public that all their kids should be put through a house fire. :P


    Wolf
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    "Be fair with others, but then keep after them until they're fair with you." Alan Alda
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  4. #3 House Fire Simulator 
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    Actually we do put the kids in a room and activate a smoke machine, simulating a house fire.

    The kids practice what to do in the room without any smoke and do fine. When we activate the machine (just a puff at the ceiling) they freeze. A little prodding gets them going and they remember what to do again. I am hoping that the "fear/suprise" of the smoke helps them during the real thing.

    Dan Phillips
    www.escapeandwait.com
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf View Post
    Then of course there's the fact that children seem to remember things best when there's a bit of trauma associated with it. However, I doubt you'd be able to convince the general public that all their kids should be put through a house fire. :P
    I've never worded it quite like that, but I agree with the meaning that trauma=memory. But instead of putting the kids through something like that directly, we went to fireservicebooks.com and put the family through an firefighter training course that included manuals, workbooks, exams, and DVDs showing real-life situations. Having to learn and see the videos was such a "hands-on" that the fire safety lessons and behaviors were drilled into their heads.
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