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Thread: A question about a message from the 1960s

  1. #1 A question about a message from the 1960s 
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    When my mother was a teenager, she cut a poster out of her local newspaper. It featured many large buttons with messages. Most of the statements were odd things that probably came from hippies and beatniks, but the one that I found most peculiar read: "God is alive and well in Mexico City." Was that a random, senseless quote for the sake of being funny, or did it bear significance? My mother said that the line might have had something to do with drugs, but otherwise had no idea what it meant.


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    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    Most likely a response to the "God is Dead" movement of the time. There was a rise in the reference to this quote of Nietzsche. There was even a time magazine cover in 1966 which asked "Is God Dead?".


    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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    Thank you, Janus. Do you know why Mexico City would be chosen in this instance?
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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theresa View Post
    Thank you, Janus. Do you know why Mexico City would be chosen in this instance?
    Mexico was commonly portrayed as exotic and a place where one could go and (supposedly) get easy access to drugs or escape from justice. (I don't know how true either of these stereotypes were - maybe there was no extradition treaty with the US).

    So I suppose it was a bit of a hippy Nirvana, at the time.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Theresa View Post
    Thank you, Janus. Do you know why Mexico City would be chosen in this instance?
    Mexico was commonly portrayed as exotic and a place where one could go and (supposedly) get easy access to drugs or escape from justice. (I don't know how true either of these stereotypes were - maybe there was no extradition treaty with the US).

    So I suppose it was a bit of a hippy Nirvana, at the time.
    And somewhere in the back of my mind, I seem to remember that "alive and well and in Mexico city" was previously attached to someone else. It could be this:
    https://nicktuckerphotography.com/fr...lo-alive-well/
    Since she died in the 1950's, it would have predated the button.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Theresa View Post
    Thank you, Janus. Do you know why Mexico City would be chosen in this instance?
    Mexico was commonly portrayed as exotic and a place where one could go and (supposedly) get easy access to drugs or escape from justice. (I don't know how true either of these stereotypes were - maybe there was no extradition treaty with the US).

    So I suppose it was a bit of a hippy Nirvana, at the time.
    And somewhere in the back of my mind, I seem to remember that "alive and well and in Mexico city" was previously attached to someone else. It could be this:
    https://nicktuckerphotography.com/fr...lo-alive-well/
    Since she died in the 1950's, it would have predated the button.
    Presumably NOT a reference to Trotsky, though.
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    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theresa View Post
    When my mother was a teenager, she cut a poster out of her local newspaper. It featured many large buttons with messages. Most of the statements were odd things that probably came from hippies and beatniks, but the one that I found most peculiar read: "God is alive and well in Mexico City." Was that a random, senseless quote for the sake of being funny, or did it bear significance? My mother said that the line might have had something to do with drugs, but otherwise had no idea what it meant.
    Was there one saying "Kilroy was here" by any chance?
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    Thank you, Janus. Since it's an isolated story, I don't think that the one on the link that you have posted has anything to do with the message on the button. Likely, the reference is to the city itself.
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    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theresa View Post
    Thank you, Janus. Since it's an isolated story, I don't think that the one on the link that you have posted has anything to do with the message on the button. Likely, the reference is to the city itself.
    What I meant was that the phrase " ... is alive and well in Mexico city" had already been use before the button was made. The people who made that button just reworded it for their button. It was an adaptation of an existing phrase.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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    I knew what you meant, but figured that the mention of the same city in the article about the woman was sheer coincidence. However, I might have discovered the answer to my second question. I stumbled upon a site that mentioned a Day Of The Dead celebration in Mexico City. Maybe that observational day was the connection between the insistence that God was alive and the choice of the Mexican capital. Even though the purpose of the message was to declare that God was not dead, it might have been easier and more comfortable to say so through the use of a country that didn't view death the traditional way.
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