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Thread: Moon landing photo's

  1. #1 Moon landing photo's 
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    How come there are no stars visible on the photo of NASA's moon landings ?

    I would have thought they would have been a lot more visible seeing as there is no atmosphere ?


    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

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  3. #2 Re: Moon landing photo's 
    Forum Ph.D. william's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    How come there are no stars visible on the photo of NASA's moon landings ?

    I would have thought they would have been a lot more visible seeing as there is no atmosphere ?
    Earth has an atmosphere, yet we still see stars at night. But let me ask you a question and see if you can answer your original question from this;
    where would you see more stars in the night sky here on Earth, looking at the sky from within a city, or looking at the sky from an isolated desert spot? When you have an answer, ask yourself why one is better than the other.

    Or... here is a related question; why can't we see stars during the day? (Hint: It's not entirely the atmosphere's fault....)

    Cheers,
    william


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  4. #3 Dark side of the moon 
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    Oh I see, so if they were taken on the dark side of the moon; stars WOULD have been visible ?
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

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  5. #4  
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    from what i read somewhere, the reasons stars are not visible is something to do with camera settings, they had to crank it down a bit

    could be wrong though
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  6. #5  
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    Stand in a well lit room - go straight outside and see if you can see stars, your eye dilates to let more light in - same on the moon with a camera, it is set to the average light from the ground - if you opened it up to see the stars, the foreground would be over exposed.

    Also look at how pale the moon is when the sun is up, then how bright it is at night.
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  7. #6  
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    actually nasa's r fooling us. they had landed on some another planet instead of moon. proof.. moon is made of helium gas, how can one hop(jump) on gas or land spaceship!!!
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  8. #7  
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    "Pretend for a moment you are an astronaut on the surface of the Moon. You want to take a picture of your fellow space traveler. The Sun is low off the horizon, since all the lunar landings were done at local morning. How do you set your camera? The lunar landscape is brightly lit by the Sun, of course, and your friend is wearing a white spacesuit also brilliantly lit by the Sun. To take a picture of a bright object with a bright background, you need to set the exposure time to be fast, and close down the aperture setting too; that's like the pupil in your eye constricting to let less light in when you walk outside on a sunny day.

    So the picture you take is set for bright objects. Stars are faint objects! In the fast exposure, they simply do not have time to register on the film. It has nothing to do with the sky being black or the lack of air, it's just a matter of exposure time. If you were to go outside here on Earth on the darkest night imaginable and take a picture with the exact same camera settings the astronauts used, you won't see any stars!"

    http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/tv/f...llo.html#stars
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by weknowtheword
    moon is made of helium gas
    Oh, really?
    And why do you think so?
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  10. #9 Re: Dark side of the moon 
    Forum Freshman Frozenoak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    Oh I see, so if they were taken on the dark side of the moon; stars WOULD have been visible ?
    simply put: Yes.
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  11. #10  
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    More to the point. With objects such as the Ground visible in the physical astronauts eyesight within 8 minutes previous, even the Astronauts shouldn't have been able to see stars due to the pupils in their eye contacting to regulate light-flow so as not to pain their retinas. My Bedroom has a window which faces the rising sun during Winter, and I have some very good shades on the windows so that my room is still dark in the mornings. When I wake up I can see my black socks in my drawer which is always in shade due to it's placement relitave to the window. When I open the blind and get a face full of sun, my eyes hurt for a few minutes while they adjust to the wildly increased light. Soon they stop hurting and I can look out the window at the street below, but when i go to put my socks on I have to feel around because I can't see a darn thing in there.

    At Night with my desk lamp on, I can see my socks just fine.


    To see some of these concepts in action with a Camera, take a look at this video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEizr7pr1Kc

    In the first few seconds you can see easily the Pilots Hand on the Controll stick and a few instruments, Then when the view pans further up the camera apeture reduces to let in less light so that the view out the window becomes less overexposed. Suddenly the pilots hand and all the control instruments fade into darkness.

    Apply this to the Moon landings now: Although the Sky is Black, it is not Night time! It is infact day time, and the light coming from the sun is every bit as bright as it is here on earth, if not brighter. The only difference is there is no air to scatter the light around the sky, so the only thing reflecting light is surfaces like Ground, People, Spacecraft...
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  12. #11  
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    thats cool so then when the took pictures of the earth from the moon why does only part of the earth is seen
    infoaddict.com is THE source for strange, weird, or just plain wacky web news.
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  13. #12  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDev
    thats cool so then when the took pictures of the earth from the moon why does only part of the earth is seen
    Because that is the part that is facing the sun.
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  14. #13  
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    yeah. The sunlight on the moon would be overpowering for the camera so they needed to tone down the brightness quite a bit on the camera. So much that the stars aren't visible.
    "The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt" - Bertrand Russell
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by weknowtheword
    actually nasa's r fooling us. they had landed on some another planet instead of moon. proof.. moon is made of helium gas, how can one hop(jump) on gas or land spaceship!!!
    lol, I'm not sure which part of your post to correct first...
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  16. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by BumFluff
    yeah. The sunlight on the moon would be overpowering for the camera so they needed to tone down the brightness quite a bit on the camera. So much that the stars aren't visible.
    I would believe this explanation the most. The moon is a very bright object. It's white, and gets hit by sunlight that hasn't had to pass through an atmosphere.

    I'm betting that, if they didn't deliberately dim their camera quite a lot, all we'd be seeing when they pointed it at the moon is a white blurr.
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax
    Quote Originally Posted by BumFluff
    yeah. The sunlight on the moon would be overpowering for the camera so they needed to tone down the brightness quite a bit on the camera. So much that the stars aren't visible.
    I would believe this explanation the most. The moon is a very bright object. It's white, and gets hit by sunlight that hasn't had to pass through an atmosphere.

    I'm betting that, if they didn't deliberately dim their camera quite a lot, all we'd be seeing when they pointed it at the moon is a white blurr.
    And it's the correct answer considering I've read posts on other forums consisting of this exact discvussion and the people who knew photography explained it in about this same way. Either the aperture or whatever it is that makes the cameras focus dimmer when it bright light.
    "The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt" - Bertrand Russell
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  18. #17  
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    It's kind of pretty lame not to see stars in pictures.
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