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Thread: Fitness questions

  1. #1 Fitness questions 
    Forum Professor Pendragon's Avatar
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    A few months ago I started doing fitness, but I have some questions about how to do it effectively. Btw I can really recommend it, even after a few weeks you notice the difference! The first times were heavy, but I got used to it much faster than I expected.

    One thing I heard is that muscle building and cardio training (high intensity) don't go together well: during cardio you break down the muscles you just built up. Is this correct? Do you have to choose between cardio exercise and muscle building, or can it be combined in some way?

    And is it better to do muscle building training in a relaxed way (taking time between different exercises / machines, letting the heartrate drop to a normal value before continuing), or in a more 'explosive' way? (only short breaks or none at all; the muscles don't seem to need long breaks, they recover quite fast)

    Last one: does it help to eat/drink protein-rich food after muscle building exercise? Or does it only help if you eat/drink it before exercise (I do both, but perhaps it doesnt help after exercise)

    I suppose much of this depends on energy release from nutrients, for different types of exercise. But that's something I know very little about.


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  3. #2  
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    Cardio has to be included in muscel building because if you don't do cardio before and after your workout then you will injure yourself. Cardio stretches out your muscels beforehand and allows yoru heart to cool down afterwards. Most serious bodybuilders take in about 200 grams of protein a day (which is a lot) and eat about 5 meals a day, usually chicken and rice.


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  4. #3  
    墨子 DaBOB's Avatar
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    My advice is to listen to yourself and don't stress over it. When you start thinking too hard you begin to miss the point.

    That being said I think I can answer all your questions. I am a Martial Artist and when it comes to fitness I believe the most important thing is functionality. After all, what's the point in being fit if you can't even lift a box, or sit straight in a chair?

    For functional fitness you need everything. You need to be able to run long distance, or sprint, or jump, or have fast power, or a slow strong push. Everything should be trained. Unless you are training for a specific event don't worry about conflicting exercises.
    You said it yourself, you notice results very fast. Just think, if there's ever an event you want to be really, really good at, you can just change your routine and add a little patience.
    I run long distance nearly every day yet I can still out sprint most (if not all) of my friends. I probably wouldn't beat a marathon runner but, if I new I was going to do a marathon it wouldn't take too long to change things up.

    Also, the body tends to plateau. If you work the same chest machine every day (or training session) you will notice quick results (as you've mentioned) but you will eventually plateau and wonder why you can't do any more. This is one reason I don't like the machines. Take push ups for example. There are hundreds of ways to do push-ups but on a machine there is only one way. Every week or two try to change up your routine. I actually change mine every night. I'll often do a few exercises the same and change a few others.

    The best exercises are usually push-ups, sit-ups, and pull-ups (and all the variations on them). My usual routine consists of these and hand stands, dips, vaults (over things), running, and much more. I can do all of this at my local High School campus (well, as long is school is not in session). No machines, no club payments, no limits.
    Another important thing is how far you push yourself. You need to go far enough so that your body knows to start repairing and building but; if you go too far you won't be healed up enough for the next workout. I workout almost everyday, so I push myself but not too far so that the next day I can go a little harder.

    Sorry, I didn't mean to write you an essay.
    I recently came across this website that I really like.

    RossTraining.com

    The guy is a boxer but his training philosophy is universal.

    Recap:

    First Question: Don't worry about conflicting training types unless your goals are very specific. If your just starting out I would just do general everything until your used to it anyways.

    Second Question: If your a little tired one day than go a little slower. If your real excited than work harder. There is no right or wrong way as long as you aren't pushing past your limits. Think of your body like a spring: it can work forever and always bounce back unless you push it beyond it's limit. I usually pick to or three exercises and switch between them so I'm taking breaks but keeping the blood flowing. Work explosive stuff one day and slow power the next.

    Third Question: I wouldn't worry about the food too much. My workout food is water. Sometimes I'll get a Landjaeger for after my workout but not usually. Again don't fuss over this unless you have very specific goals and your making this training a very serious part of your life. I'm a Martial Artist and train almost everyday and I don't worry about this stuff very often. Just make sure you have a balanced diet (and that doesn't mean you eat the entire food pyramid; that will make you fat).

    Check this out: Morning in Ritan Park - Beijing
    My favorite is the guy with the cane.
    Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you'll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself. -Spoon Boy
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  5. #4  
    Forum Professor Pendragon's Avatar
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    That's a lot of tips, thanks! :-D

    Atm I'm training twice a week. One training is warming-up, sit-ups, push-ups, 7 machines for muscle building, cool-down. The other is the same but with 30-40 mins fat burning afterwards (cross-trainer at 130 heartbeats/min or less).

    Quote Originally Posted by DaBOB
    Just think, if there's ever an event you want to be really, really good at, you can just change your routine and add a little patience.
    That would be a hiking tour. So yea I'll just add some high-intensity cardio to the scheme when I'm preparing for that.

    Quote Originally Posted by DaBOB
    Also, the body tends to plateau. If you work the same chest machine every day (or training session) you will notice quick results (as you've mentioned) but you will eventually plateau and wonder why you can't do any more.
    Yea exactly, on some machines I'm starting to notice this as well. So some variation would be good, tnx for the tip.

    Quote Originally Posted by DaBOB
    Third Question: I wouldn't worry about the food too much. My workout food is water. Sometimes I'll get a Landjaeger for after my workout but not usually. Again don't fuss over this unless you have very specific goals and your making this training a very serious part of your life. I'm a Martial Artist and train almost everyday and I don't worry about this stuff very often. Just make sure you have a balanced diet (and that doesn't mean you eat the entire food pyramid; that will make you fat).
    Ok, maybe I worry slightly more about it because I'm a vegetarian, so I have to plan where I get my proteins from. Atm I just add more egg and cheese to the mail before training, and some soil milk before and after. Seems to work so far.
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  6. #5  
    墨子 DaBOB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pendragon
    That would be a hiking tour. So yea I'll just add some high-intensity cardio to the scheme when I'm preparing for that.
    Here's some ideas.

    If you have a football field nearby try this: Run to the first line (I think it's like 5 yards or something), then run back, then run to the second line and back and so on till you've done the whole field. Each time make sure to touch the line with the same hand.

    Try running up hills.

    I would think jump rope would be beneficial for hiking as well because it develops good explosive power and strengthens the ankles. If you're new to it though it can take a while to get good at.

    Do you ever go running through the woods? There are a few nice parks by where I live and I love to go running through them once in a while. Especially when it snows.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pendragon
    Yea exactly, on some machines I'm starting to notice this as well. So some variation would be good, tnx for the tip.
    One other problem with machines is that most of your body is relaxed except the part that is being worked. As opposed to a pull-up where you work your arms, shoulders, back and more; and also you develop coordination. If you take two people with equal strength but one uses machines and one uses pull-ups, and have them switch routines you will find the person doing pull-ups will have little troubles but the person who had been doing the machines will not function as well because they have not developed the coordination.
    I have heard (although I can't remember the source) that people who can do handstand push-ups can usually perform far better on a machine than a bodybuilder (who only uses machines) could.
    So it sounds like I hate machines but don't get me wrong. I'm just telling you what works for me and in the end we all have to adapt to ourselves. Also, I don't like to pay for equipment to improve my fitness; I am my equipment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pendragon
    maybe I worry slightly more about it because I'm a vegetarian
    This would change things a bit. I never eat before a workout though. I usually workout early, before breakfast, or late, a few hours after dinner. When you're working out your digestive system sort of shuts down and the extra food will only slow you down. Just work on a good diet and maybe have a light snack after a workout (what about peanut butter; I love peanut butter). I believe sprouted grains have some good protein but I can't remember, also beens are good. Cook them well though, or you might get a little gassy .
    I'm not vegetarian but I'm on a tight budget that usually doesn't include meat. I honestly believe my main source of protein is peanuts and milk.
    Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you'll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself. -Spoon Boy
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  7. #6  
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    Yes, i agree with Pendragon, I think he is right...
    Me too read lots comments regarding this discussion on other web sites...
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  8. #7  
    墨子 DaBOB's Avatar
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    For some cheap equipment for total body work outs I came across what seems to be a great idea. They are called "power towers". I think I'm going to get one soon, it seems you can do everything important on it (pull-ups, chin-ups, leg-lifts, dips, push-ups, or whatever else your imagination can come up with).

    Power Tower
    Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you'll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself. -Spoon Boy
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  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman toxicpie's Avatar
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    What is cardio training?
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  10. #9  
    墨子 DaBOB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toxicpie
    What is cardio training?
    cardio=cardiovascular

    cardio training is pretty much anything to do with blood vessels and the heart.
    So basically anything that involves raising your heart rate above normal for a long period of time.

    Examples: Running, jump rope or hitting a punching bad for a while. Most recommendations suggest at least twenty minutes at the higher heart rate. At least three times a week.

    Many other body systems play a role as well. The blood carries more oxygen, the lungs take deeper breathes, the muscles contain more mitochondria (burn oxygen faster) and so on.
    Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you'll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself. -Spoon Boy
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  11. #10  
    Forum Sophomore GrowlingDog's Avatar
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    Well, i ran my own Martial Arts school for about 12 years and also fought Thai boxing in the ring.
    When i was training very intensive for fights, i found that weights could be incorporated into my training to great benefit. I had a weights trainer and a Thai trainer.
    The cardio would be just a little in the morning, usually a 20-30 minute run and some shadow boxing. In the evening (about 6pm) i would do a more intensive 2 hour Thai boxing workout with my Thai trainer.
    With the weights training, i would train mostly about 2-3pm for about 45 minutes and usually just work 2 muscle groups, Chest and Triceps, back and biceps, shoulders and calves. I also did a weights free workout for my legs that involved lots of lunges and stuff like that. I would train weights 2 days on then 1 day off which would usually give the muscles time to fully recover and the weight workouts were very intensive and there were very few rests and if i had them they were only short. Anyone that tells you they did weights for 2 hours is just wasting too much time. It should not take longer than 45 minutes and you should get puffed during it. Resting for 5 minutes between each set is just your brain wanting to get out of it, don't give into it.
    As for protein, yes, i found protein was essential for muscle recovery, get a lot of chicken breast into you and red meats 2, maybe 3 times a week. If you are doing more weights than cardio then back off on the carbs (breads, potatoes, rice, pasta). If your doing more cardio than weights then carbs are fine. Try and stay away from eating carbs for dinner unless you plan on working out after dinner.
    After a while, you will get to see what works for you and if your training is intense enough, you will find that your body talks to you very loudly when it wants something, at least it does for me.
    Keep up the training and remember the hardest part about training is turning up. All you have to do is keep turning up and i guarantee you will feel better at the end of every workout than you did before you started.
    Good luck and let me know how it goes
    Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it.
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