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Thread: Mouldy bread

  1. #1 Mouldy bread 
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    I have some shop bought sliced bread that has started to get mouldy.

    Can I still use it for toast?

    Will heat kill off the pathogens and what harm does mould in bread do to the body (is that what may have been historically behind the story of the Pied Piper of Hamlin ?)


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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    I have some shop bought sliced bread that has started to get mouldy.

    Can I still use it for toast?

    Will heat kill off the pathogens and what harm does mould in bread do to the body (is that what may have been historically behind the story of the Pied Piper of Hamlin ?)
    I can't speak about mouldy bread specifically, but generally speaking, it is not sufficient to kill the organisms because they may have produced toxins that are not deactivated by cooking.

    Historically, Saint Anthony's Fire was caused by ingestion of ergot alkaloids produced by the Claviceps purpurea fungus that infects rye and other cereals.


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  4. #3  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    Bread is cheap, throw it away and buy a new loaf
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  5. #4  
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    Mean habits die hard (it also means going shopping or baking )

    I knew someone (notably mean) who never threw out cream but put it on his pudding. That is foul but I have learned to use it indistinguishably in cooking savoury dishes.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Mean habits die hard (it also means going shopping or baking )

    I knew someone (notably mean) who never threw out cream but put it on his pudding. That is foul but I have learned to use it indistinguishably in cooking savoury dishes.
    I suspect that just goes sour, without becoming poisonous.

    (Also I got fed up with this damned thread on oral sex showing up on the main screen. )
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  7. #6  
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    A zombie thread too.

    I also use sour milk the same way now in sauces so long as it hasn't curdled.
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    A zombie thread too.

    I also use sour milk the same way now in sauces so long as it hasn't curdled.
    Every year, my wife uses buttermilk to make my favorite birthday cake. There is always some left over. I'll generally use it to make buttermilk pancakes, but I'll not always get to it right away. My wife will sometimes bug me about using it up quickly, to which I reply, "Why? what's it going to do, go sour?
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    A zombie thread too.

    I also use sour milk the same way now in sauces so long as it hasn't curdled.
    Every year, my wife uses buttermilk to make my favorite birthday cake. There is always some left over. I'll generally use it to make buttermilk pancakes, but I'll not always get to it right away. My wife will sometimes bug me about using it up quickly, to which I reply, "Why? what's it going to do, go sour?
    I am ashamed to say I don't what the behaviour of buttermilk is. Is it sour to start with or something?
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  10. #9  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    A zombie thread too.

    I also use sour milk the same way now in sauces so long as it hasn't curdled.
    Every year, my wife uses buttermilk to make my favorite birthday cake. There is always some left over. I'll generally use it to make buttermilk pancakes, but I'll not always get to it right away. My wife will sometimes bug me about using it up quickly, to which I reply, "Why? what's it going to do, go sour?
    I am ashamed to say I don't what the behaviour of buttermilk is. Is it sour to start with or something?
    Buttermilk is essentially fermented or "soured" milk. The type you buy in the store starts with pasteurized milk to which they add bacteria cultures in order to ferment it by converting the lactose to lactic acid.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    A zombie thread too.

    I also use sour milk the same way now in sauces so long as it hasn't curdled.
    Every year, my wife uses buttermilk to make my favorite birthday cake. There is always some left over. I'll generally use it to make buttermilk pancakes, but I'll not always get to it right away. My wife will sometimes bug me about using it up quickly, to which I reply, "Why? what's it going to do, go sour?
    I am ashamed to say I don't what the behaviour of buttermilk is. Is it sour to start with or something?
    Buttermilk is essentially fermented or "soured" milk. The type you buy in the store starts with pasteurized milk to which they add bacteria cultures in order to ferment it by converting the lactose to lactic acid.
    This reply baffled me until I looked it up. I thought buttermilk was the mostly aqueous phase left behind after churning butter. In Britain I suspect this is still its meaning. But I see that, as you say, the term is also used to denote deliberately soured whole milk. I do recall a disgusting but popular milk drink when we were in the Netherlands, which was something like this. I expect it may be good for cooking but nothing would persuade me to drink it.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post


    This reply baffled me until I looked it up. I thought buttermilk was the mostly aqueous phase left behind after churning butter. In Britain I suspect this is still its meaning. But I see that, as you say, the term is also used to denote deliberately soured whole milk. I do recall a disgusting but popular milk drink when we were in the Netherlands, which was something like this. I expect it may be good for cooking but nothing would persuade me to drink it.
    Kefir is much nicer.
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  13. #12  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    A zombie thread too.

    I also use sour milk the same way now in sauces so long as it hasn't curdled.
    Every year, my wife uses buttermilk to make my favorite birthday cake. There is always some left over. I'll generally use it to make buttermilk pancakes, but I'll not always get to it right away. My wife will sometimes bug me about using it up quickly, to which I reply, "Why? what's it going to do, go sour?
    I am ashamed to say I don't what the behaviour of buttermilk is. Is it sour to start with or something?
    Buttermilk is essentially fermented or "soured" milk. The type you buy in the store starts with pasteurized milk to which they add bacteria cultures in order to ferment it by converting the lactose to lactic acid.
    This reply baffled me until I looked it up. I thought buttermilk was the mostly aqueous phase left behind after churning butter. In Britain I suspect this is still its meaning. But I see that, as you say, the term is also used to denote deliberately soured whole milk. I do recall a disgusting but popular milk drink when we were in the Netherlands, which was something like this. I expect it may be good for cooking but nothing would persuade me to drink it.
    It's the difference between "cultured" buttermilk and "traditional" buttermilk. Traditional buttermilk is popular in India and in that region. Cultured buttermilk is what you are likely to find in Western countries. Growing up, we had a milk cow and my mom made her own butter from the cream, but we never called the liquid left over buttermilk.

    My Dad loved drinking cultured buttermilk, but that's probably because his parents were Finnish immigrants and he was raised on it.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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