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Thread: Why am I gaining weight

  1. #1 Why am I gaining weight 
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    Hello,


    I'm on a diet, trying to lose weight, and I'm wondering why some days I gain weight and some days I lose weight. I'm monitoring my calories and being sure I'm under 2000 every day. I also commute to work on my bike everyday, half an hour per leg.


    Two days ago, I weighed myself. I was at 175 lb. Then yesterday, I weighed myself. I was at 176 lb. This morning, I was at 177 lb.


    Here's what I ate yesterday:


    yogurt for breakfast: 35 calories
    soup for lunch: 200
    crackers with the soup: 100
    chicken salad for supper:
    romain lettuce: 10
    roma tomato: 35
    carrot: 25
    1/3 yellow bell pepper: 20
    4 or 5 broccoli spears: 10
    mushrooms: 5
    cucumber: 5
    1 chicken breast: 150
    blue cheese dressing: 240
    croutons: 60
    parmesan cheese 240
    TOTAL: 1135


    I munched on a few snacks throughout the day, but it couldn't have been more than 200 calories worth. So let's bring the total up to 1335. <-- Well under 2000 calories, plus the bike riding, yet I still gained a pound since yesterday.


    The day before was a similar diet: yogurt for breakfast, soup with crackers for lunch, a salad for supper. The only difference in the salad was that the meat was fish, not chicken. Fish is typically less than chicken in terms of calories but this fish was 1.5 to 2 times bigger than the chicken breast I had last night, and I also battered it with oil. My batter recipe consists of crushed bread crumbs, whipped egg, and oil. If I were to guess, I'd say the fish was between 300 and 400 calories. That's a difference of 150 to 250 calories from the chicken. Let's say 250. Add the same 200 calories for snacks, I estimate that yesterday I consumed 1335 + 250 = 1585. <-- Still under 2000.


    Yet I still seem to be gaining weight. Why?


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    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    Your weight will fluctuate quite a lot over short time periods (frankly a full bladder or a good bowel movement can make a difference ). Don't weigh yourself daily, but rather weekly or monthly, if you are consuming fewer calories than you use you will see weight loss over longer periods.


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    If that is your diet then you are probably not eating enough to lose weight - at least not safely and consistently. Get moderate exercise and try keep your calorie deficit to around 400 calories a day. A 30 year old male of average height and your weight would have a base metabolic burn rate of around 1700 calories a day (plus minus a couple of 100 calories, don't get too hung up on the numbers at that level as the error bars on this stuff are massive). If you are moderately active during the day that means you need around 2200 calories to maintain weight. Your target food consumption should then be around 1800 calories per day.

    If you try a starvation diet you will tend to lose more lean muscle mass than body fat as your body tries to preserve fat - which hurts any chance of weight loss.
    As is often the case with technical subjects we are presented with an unfortunate choice: an explanation that is accurate but incomprehensible, or comprehensible but wrong.
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    PhDemon has it exactly right. Water weight alone will change overall weight by 1-2% even in a couple hours. Any more often than weekly weigh-ins and even those over similar conditions-- (e.g. 7AM every Tuesday) is a waste of time.
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  6. #5  
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    The simple answer to this is if calories in are greater than calories out then you probably will gain weight.
    If your weight only goes up by a small amount I wouldn't worry. Go for a nice long walk instead!
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    cut the crackers, blue cheese and, croutons and parmesan

    use vinegar and oil for dressing

    you have four big fat items in your diet

    and

    can I have five pounds!

    I can't keep weight ON
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  8. #7  
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    Sometimes it isn't about what we eat but when we eat. Do you eat late at night or evening?
    Remember, the older we get the harder it can be to burn of calories and keep them off.
    Now, I don't want to sound patronising but people in the USA have their biggest meal (dinner) later in the day/evening. This will contribute to obesity epidemic. They even have supper.
    Supper is not really something that's a given in UK. That I know of.

    Good luck and keep going. You are aiming in the right direction at least in trying to help your general well-being.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by gib65 View Post
    Hello,


    I'm on a diet, trying to lose weight, and I'm wondering why some days I gain weight and some days I lose weight. I'm monitoring my calories and being sure I'm under 2000 every day. I also commute to work on my bike everyday, half an hour per leg.


    Two days ago, I weighed myself. I was at 175 lb. Then yesterday, I weighed myself. I was at 176 lb. This morning, I was at 177 lb.


    Here's what I ate yesterday:


    yogurt for breakfast: 35 calories
    soup for lunch: 200
    crackers with the soup: 100
    chicken salad for supper:
    romain lettuce: 10
    roma tomato: 35
    carrot: 25
    1/3 yellow bell pepper: 20
    4 or 5 broccoli spears: 10
    mushrooms: 5
    cucumber: 5
    1 chicken breast: 150
    blue cheese dressing: 240
    croutons: 60
    parmesan cheese 240
    TOTAL: 1135


    I munched on a few snacks throughout the day, but it couldn't have been more than 200 calories worth. So let's bring the total up to 1335. <-- Well under 2000 calories, plus the bike riding, yet I still gained a pound since yesterday.


    The day before was a similar diet: yogurt for breakfast, soup with crackers for lunch, a salad for supper. The only difference in the salad was that the meat was fish, not chicken. Fish is typically less than chicken in terms of calories but this fish was 1.5 to 2 times bigger than the chicken breast I had last night, and I also battered it with oil. My batter recipe consists of crushed bread crumbs, whipped egg, and oil. If I were to guess, I'd say the fish was between 300 and 400 calories. That's a difference of 150 to 250 calories from the chicken. Let's say 250. Add the same 200 calories for snacks, I estimate that yesterday I consumed 1335 + 250 = 1585. <-- Still under 2000.


    Yet I still seem to be gaining weight. Why?
    I am always suspicious of the dietary claims of people who eat "snacks". In my experience, people who are regularly seen eating "snacks" are nearly always fat.
    Do not eat "snacks". At all. Get out of the habit - it's a really bad one.

    And what are you drinking? Water? Tea? Coffee? Or.......... fizzy drinks?
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    If you are drinking a lot of soda or sugary drinks I would recommend drinking sparkling water instead if you would like because it has no calories.
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    As others have mentioned, body weight will fluctuate quite a bit as certain foods will slow down the digestive process and/or the body will retain fluids. Fats and salts, dairy and breads have that effect on me.

    In the example you show above, I would suspect the battered fish and dressing as being the main culprits. Ten days ago I treated my mother to fish and chips and we shared a large serving between us. The next morning I was a full two pounds heavier! The weight was gone plus an additional pound three days later when next I weighed myself.

    Be judicious about when you eat and it is good advice to eat sparingly after midday. Choose healthy snacks if you must, and learn to make your own food to avoid the host of additives and preservatives that go into most processed food to enhance appearance and extend shelf life. Many people are sensitive to the GRAS (generally regarded as safe) ingredients and these also can lead to fluid retention and weight gain.

    Remember to be mindful of the calories in each of your beverages because they do add up quickly.
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    A diet high in sodium can cause water retention inside your body and cells and cause you to gain some weight too. The simplest fix to this is to drink plenty of water to flush out the sodium from your body and cells and to consume less sodium.
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    Nitpick! I hate it when people talk about eating sodium! Sodium is a very reactive metal, eating it would kill you! You mean sodium chloride or salt!

    [/end chemist rant]
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  14. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Nitpick! I hate it when people talk about eating sodium! Sodium is a very reactive metal, eating it would kill you! You mean sodium chloride or salt!

    [/end chemist rant]
    Correct! Sodium Chloride is commonly referred to as salt but in chemistry there are actually many different kinds of salts made up of different elements.
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  15. #14  
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    Sometimes weight gain can be due to muscle building. If you ride your bike a lot you may have just put on a pound or two of muscle.
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  16. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Correct! Sodium Chloride is commonly referred to as salt but in chemistry there are actually many different kinds of salts made up of different elements.
    I know, I'm a chemist! But thanks Captain Obvious
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Correct! Sodium Chloride is commonly referred to as salt but in chemistry there are actually many different kinds of salts made up of different elements.
    I know, I'm a chemist! But thanks Captain Obvious
    Ha ha! You got me!
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    I am another individual what wants to lose weight.
    I have to admit I find the process difficult, and one reason is that I am constantly "snacking".
    My partner is generally supportive although I have noticed, at times, she makes snide remarks about my substantial stomach.
    Recently, I remarked to one of the chums, who happens to be even heavier than myself, we should take up the triathlon.
    He, sarcastically, called this a ridiculous suggestion especially as we are both in late middle age.
    Sadly, I now find myself agreeing with him.
    The only answer is willpower leading to a reduction in food consumption, less drinking of beer, and a number of dreadful visits to the gym.
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    Yes I wonder about "snacking". Is it proven that snacking does indeed put on weight?

    If so ,how can one break this habit in such a way as to make one's new eating regime comfortable and second nature so as not to slip back into the old ways.?

    I have been thinking about never starting to eat unless there is an actual physical message from your stomach that it wants food.

    Would that be a sensible/realistic policy ? (again provided that snacking does actually put on weight)
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    It is a fact that we eat frequently out of habit and boredom, consuming more calories than we require and many of those calories come from foods that offer little nutritional benefit.

    The simple math is that if we take in more calories than we use, the excess will lead to weight gain, albeit sometimes the gain can be very gradual. Our lifestyle, activity and metabolism changes over time and we need to bear this in mind also and adjust our diet accordingly. When I was training sled dogs for the Yukon Quest race, I could consume more calories than a man twice my size and not gain weight. I had to downscale my appetite considerably when I gave up that activity.

    Our species benefits from activity and walking has long been demonstrated to be a very beneficial and enjoyable form of exercise and swimming is another that utilizes a wide range of muscles and can be low impact for a good starting point, depending on facilities that may be available to you.

    As far as snacking goes, sensible snacks are less detrimental to your objective of weight loss and seasonal berries, apples, fresh veggies, plain popcorn and lean protein in moderation can all be satisfactory.

    The calories in beverages, especially juices and alcoholic drinks add up quickly. Eating sensible sized portions will also decrease one's daily caloric intake significantly.
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  21. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    It is a fact that we eat frequently out of habit and boredom, consuming more calories than we require and many of those calories come from foods that offer little nutritional benefit.

    The simple math is that if we take in more calories than we use, the excess will lead to weight gain, albeit sometimes the gain can be very gradual. Our lifestyle, activity and metabolism changes over time and we need to bear this in mind also and adjust our diet accordingly. When I was training sled dogs for the Yukon Quest race, I could consume more calories than a man twice my size and not gain weight. I had to downscale my appetite considerably when I gave up that activity.

    Our species benefits from activity and walking has long been demonstrated to be a very beneficial and enjoyable form of exercise and swimming is another that utilizes a wide range of muscles and can be low impact for a good starting point, depending on facilities that may be available to you.

    As far as snacking goes, sensible snacks are less detrimental to your objective of weight loss and seasonal berries, apples, fresh veggies, plain popcorn and lean protein in moderation can all be satisfactory.

    The calories in beverages, especially juices and alcoholic drinks add up quickly. Eating sensible sized portions will also decrease one's daily caloric intake significantly.
    Exactly. It may be partly a cultural thing. I was brought up not to eat between meals and the French and Italians are still brought up like that. Mealtimes are social occasions, to be looked forward to, treated with respect and have serious time devoted to them. That provides an incentive not to eat between times. The collapse of the formality and ceremony of mealtimes in the Anglo-Saxon world has a lot to answer for.
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  22. #21  
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    I have read that eating many small healthy meals throughout the day can be an option that can help you with weight loss because it keeps your metabolism going, keeps you from getting hungry throughout the day and snacking as a result, and helps control blood sugar. Healthy foods rich in protein and fiber are the best to eat because these foods take longer to digest and keep you feeling full longer.
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    There really is no 'trick'. It is a case of making healthier choices, eating smaller portions and including some activity.

    It is our change in living conditions, reduction of physical work and play as well as the proliferation of inexpensive, shelf stable food-like products which are
    advertised ad nauseam that are among the contributing factors. The science of food has been deployed to extend shelf life of processed foods and to create
    a flavor profile which triggers your desire for more than a small portion.

    The food industry only cares about market share.

    (A majority of beverages are sugar laden drinks which are not healthy in the least. Far better to eat a piece of whole fruit and have a glass of water.)
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  24. #23  
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    Consuming sugar is not only bad for you because it can cause weight gain, tooth decay, and type-two diabetes but it is also bad for you because it can be addictive. When you consume sugar it stimulates the same pleasure centers of the brain as cocaine or heroin. Just like cocaine or heroin sugar consumers may experience withdrawal and cravings when they try to cut down on the sugar they consume daily.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Consuming sugar is not only bad for you because it can cause weight gain, tooth decay, and type-two diabetes but it is also bad for you because it can be addictive. When you consume sugar it stimulates the same pleasure centers of the brain as cocaine or heroin. Just like cocaine or heroin sugar consumers may experience withdrawal and cravings when they try to cut down on the sugar they consume daily.
    I had very little difficulty when I more or less cut out refined sugar maybe a year ago now.So I don't recognize the addictive nature to sugar consumption personally.

    Maybe if I had tried to reduce it in stages it would have been harder but I went straight to a very low level since I rationalized to myself that it was not bringing me any nutritional benefits at all and was only elbowing out (perhaps) foods that were actually variously nutritious.

    Hardly ever a craving (and I love sweet foods).

    Of course I still get sugar in my carbs and fresh or dried fruit.
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Consuming sugar is not only bad for you because it can cause weight gain, tooth decay, and type-two diabetes but it is also bad for you because it can be addictive. When you consume sugar it stimulates the same pleasure centers of the brain as cocaine or heroin. Just like cocaine or heroin sugar consumers may experience withdrawal and cravings when they try to cut down on the sugar they consume daily.
    I had very little difficulty when I more or less cut out refined sugar maybe a year ago now. So I don't recognize the addictive nature to sugar consumption personally.

    Maybe if I had tried to reduce it in stages it would have been harder but I went straight to a very low level since I rationalized to myself that it was not bringing me any nutritional benefits at all and was only elbowing out (perhaps) foods that were actually variously nutritious.

    Hardly ever a craving (and I love sweet foods).

    Of course I still get sugar in my carbs and fresh or dried fruit.
    Congrats on reducing your sugar intake, it will be good for you in the long run. Also glad to hear you did not experience any withdraw or cravings when you cut down. I guess everybody is different in terms of experiencing any level of addiction to sugar. Maybe you did not experience any withdraw or cravings from you sugar reduction because you were still getting sugar from carbs and fruit.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post


    . Maybe you did not experience any withdraw or cravings from you sugar reduction because you were still getting sugar from carbs and fruit.
    That would make sense.
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  28. #27  
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post


    . Maybe you did not experience any withdraw or cravings from you sugar reduction because you were still getting sugar from carbs and fruit.
    That would make sense.
    Your body will turn fruit sugar fructose into fat just like it does to refined sugar. After all once the glycogen stored in the liver is full, it has no other choice than to turn incoming sugar into fat and releasing it into the bloodstream to be stored as adipose. Even if that sugar is a "healthy" sugar.
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  29. #28  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falconer360 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post


    . Maybe you did not experience any withdraw or cravings from you sugar reduction because you were still getting sugar from carbs and fruit.
    That would make sense.

    Your body will turn fruit sugar fructose into fat just like it does to refined sugar. After all once the glycogen stored in the liver is full, it has no other choice than to turn incoming sugar into fat and releasing it into the bloodstream to be stored as adipose. Even if that sugar is a "healthy" sugar.
    I'm not sure fructose is healthy at all. I read recently that high fructose corn syrup is implicated in the obesity arising from consumption of industrially produced food products. As I recall, the theory is that fructose in particular is stored as fat for a rainy day by primates, due to the ancestral diet of fruit.

    Fruit itself is good for us in other ways of course: vitamin C, fibre, etc., but it seems that the idea of fruit as part of a slimming diet may have more to do with feeling full (of fibre) after eating a modest amount of it than it being a "low calorie" option as such.
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  30. #29  
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    HFCS makes me consider the Paracelsus quote, "it's the dose and not the substance that makes the poison".
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    Lucky me. Lucky mud.
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    The dose and also the portion size in my opinion.

    Unless a person has an allergy to a food substance, they will often tolerate a small amount of an ingredient with little or minimal digestive symptoms, hence all of the 'generally regarded as safe' ingredients that are permitted for use by the food industry.

    Portion size, on the other hand, is where many people fail in their attempts to maintain a healthy weight. Calorie dense foods with minimal nutritional value and low fiber that have been flavor enhanced to be 'taste like more' are so tasty and tempting and we have been accustomed to eating almost every couple of hours with a snack at intervals between larger meals. A glass of plain water and a whole apple would be a healthy snack but most will grab for a sweet beverage and a salty carbohydrate snack.

    Portion size has been largely pushed by the competing fast food companies as they fill your plate with a mountain of fries to complement the 1400 calories already in the double or triple patty burger slathered in propriety sauces which are also rife with sugars,
    salts and fats.
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  32. #31  
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    what do you want to weigh?if its one forty talking about two less pounds is silly-a glass of water weighs a pound
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    I have heard many years ago and continue to believe as generally correct that, with everything else held constant, every extra 100 calories daily will cause one to gain weight until they are 3 pounds over their baseline, at which point the 100 extra daily calories will maintain that three pounds. Thus, that 260-calorie pack of m&ms that someone begins snacking on every afternoon, will ultimately result in a gain of 8 pounds. Realize that the weight was gained only a fraction of a pound per day, perhaps just one or two pounds a week, and it should come off at the same pace.

    I also recommend that people trying to lose weight (or otherwise) would do well to keep their caloric intake above 800 calories, otherwise the person's body might feel it is in peril and go into starvation mode to try to conserve weight, and thus defeat the purpose of the diet.
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    I have often heard it said that "diets don't work" (presumably diets with the aim of losing weight)

    I wonder if the reason they do not work (if that is indeed true) is because they are too difficult to keep up.

    Therefore perhaps the first question anyone should ask if considering a change in routine (diet or activity) is whether they can see themselves being comfortable with it in the long term.

    In fact as well as not working I would have the suspicion that diets which fail actually do more harm than good despite the probable tendency to see them as surely virtuous (too good for us?)
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    When you’re trying to lose weight or simply maintain your current weight, the last thing you want to see when you step onto the scale is unexplained weight gain.

    Last edited by Janus; March 8th, 2018 at 02:12 PM.
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    I have difficulty keeping weight ON!
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    Basically unless you have a medical condition that prevents you loosing weight, then calories used > calories induced = weight loss. The trick to doing this efficiently, safely and to maintain long term health and weight balance is to manage what and when you eat in conjunction with moderate exercise. Quality calories from a balanced food group diet, keep active and exercise moderately but regularly, should see you loose the excess weight and keep you at a nice balanced healthy body fat percentage.

    Muscle weighs more than fat so if you intend to "body build" then you may not see a massive weight loss but you may see a decreased fat percentage. Another thing to consider is that some people are skinny on the out side but fat on the inside. By this some folk store excessive fat around their internal organs but less fat externally. This is the worst scenario as it can be extremely unhealthy. A little fat (a good fat percentage) carried externally is healthy.


    Personally I focus more on my waist line measurement than my weight. I find if I can loose an inch or so off my waist I feel much better and know I look better, my weight is irrelevant at this point. Obviously this depends on how over weight you are. Someone obese, monitoring their weight loss is easier and more important to start with.


    If you want to loose excess fat healthily, then a pound or two over a longer period is far better for you and easier to maintain rather than a crash diet. Weigh yourself now a few of times through the day, take an average, then do the same in two weeks time. If your average is a pound or two less than previously you are on the right track. Better still measure your waistline now then measure it again in a months time, if you are 1/2 - 1 inch less great. But at some point you need to find a healthy balance and concentrate on try to maintain that from a well managed healthy diet and physical activity.
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    Basically unless you have a medical condition that prevents you loosing weight, then calories used > calories induced = weight loss. The trick to doing this efficiently, safely and to maintain long term health and weight balance is to manage what and when you eat in conjunction with moderate exercise. Quality calories from a balanced food group diet, keep active and exercise moderately but regularly, should see you loose the excess weight and keep you at a nice balanced healthy body fat percentage.

    Muscle weighs more than fat so if you intend to "body build" then you may not see a massive weight loss but you may see a decreased fat percentage. Another thing to consider is that some people are skinny on the out side but fat on the inside. By this some folk store excessive fat around their internal organs but less fat externally. This is the worst scenario as it can be extremely unhealthy. A little fat (a good fat percentage) carried externally is healthy.


    Personally I focus more on my waist line measurement than my weight. I find if I can loose an inch or so off my waist I feel much better and know I look better, my weight is irrelevant at this point. Obviously this depends on how over weight you are. Someone obese, monitoring their weight loss is easier and more important to start with.


    If you want to loose excess fat healthily, then a pound or two over a longer period is far better for you and easier to maintain rather than a crash diet. Weigh yourself now a few of times through the day, take an average, then do the same in two weeks time. If your average is a pound or two less than previously you are on the right track. Better still measure your waistline now then measure it again in a months time, if you are 1/2 - 1 inch less great. But at some point you need to find a healthy balance and concentrate on try to maintain that from a well managed healthy diet and physical activity.
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  39. #38  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by onemiguel1987 View Post
    When you’re trying to lose weight or simply maintain your current weight, the last thing you want to see when you step onto the scale is unexplained weight gain.
    Well, thank you for that penetrating insight.

    And for the spam links.

    Reported.
    Last edited by Janus; March 8th, 2018 at 02:20 PM.
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  40. #39  
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    Quote Originally Posted by David M W View Post
    Basically unless you have a medical condition that prevents you loosing weight, then calories used > calories induced = weight loss. The trick to doing this efficiently, safely and to maintain long term health and weight balance is to manage what and when you eat in conjunction with moderate exercise. Quality calories from a balanced food group diet, keep active and exercise moderately but regularly, should see you loose the excess weight and keep you at a nice balanced healthy body fat percentage.

    Muscle weighs more than fat so if you intend to "body build" then you may not see a massive weight loss but you may see a decreased fat percentage. Another thing to consider is that some people are skinny on the out side but fat on the inside. By this some folk store excessive fat around their internal organs but less fat externally. This is the worst scenario as it can be extremely unhealthy. A little fat (a good fat percentage) carried externally is healthy.


    Personally I focus more on my waist line measurement than my weight. I find if I can loose an inch or so off my waist I feel much better and know I look better, my weight is irrelevant at this point. Obviously this depends on how over weight you are. Someone obese, monitoring their weight loss is easier and more important to start with.


    If you want to loose excess fat healthily, then a pound or two over a longer period is far better for you and easier to maintain rather than a crash diet. Weigh yourself now a few of times through the day, take an average, then do the same in two weeks time. If your average is a pound or two less than previously you are on the right track. Better still measure your waistline now then measure it again in a months time, if you are 1/2 - 1 inch less great. But at some point you need to find a healthy balance and concentrate on try to maintain that from a well managed healthy diet and physical activity.
    "Loose" is a different verb from "lose". Generally people speak of losing weight, not loosing it.
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  41. #40  
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by David M W View Post
    Basically unless you have a medical condition that prevents you loosing weight, then calories used > calories induced = weight loss. The trick to doing this efficiently, safely and to maintain long term health and weight balance is to manage what and when you eat in conjunction with moderate exercise. Quality calories from a balanced food group diet, keep active and exercise moderately but regularly, should see you loose the excess weight and keep you at a nice balanced healthy body fat percentage.

    Muscle weighs more than fat so if you intend to "body build" then you may not see a massive weight loss but you may see a decreased fat percentage. Another thing to consider is that some people are skinny on the out side but fat on the inside. By this some folk store excessive fat around their internal organs but less fat externally. This is the worst scenario as it can be extremely unhealthy. A little fat (a good fat percentage) carried externally is healthy.


    Personally I focus more on my waist line measurement than my weight. I find if I can loose an inch or so off my waist I feel much better and know I look better, my weight is irrelevant at this point. Obviously this depends on how over weight you are. Someone obese, monitoring their weight loss is easier and more important to start with.


    If you want to loose excess fat healthily, then a pound or two over a longer period is far better for you and easier to maintain rather than a crash diet. Weigh yourself now a few of times through the day, take an average, then do the same in two weeks time. If your average is a pound or two less than previously you are on the right track. Better still measure your waistline now then measure it again in a months time, if you are 1/2 - 1 inch less great. But at some point you need to find a healthy balance and concentrate on try to maintain that from a well managed healthy diet and physical activity.
    "Loose" is a different verb from "lose". Generally people speak of losing weight, not loosing it.
    yes my bad, I didn't bother to proof read it as I'm at work at the moment
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  42. #41  
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    Quote Originally Posted by David M W View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by David M W View Post
    Basically unless you have a medical condition that prevents you loosing weight, then calories used > calories induced = weight loss. The trick to doing this efficiently, safely and to maintain long term health and weight balance is to manage what and when you eat in conjunction with moderate exercise. Quality calories from a balanced food group diet, keep active and exercise moderately but regularly, should see you loose the excess weight and keep you at a nice balanced healthy body fat percentage.

    Muscle weighs more than fat so if you intend to "body build" then you may not see a massive weight loss but you may see a decreased fat percentage. Another thing to consider is that some people are skinny on the out side but fat on the inside. By this some folk store excessive fat around their internal organs but less fat externally. This is the worst scenario as it can be extremely unhealthy. A little fat (a good fat percentage) carried externally is healthy.


    Personally I focus more on my waist line measurement than my weight. I find if I can loose an inch or so off my waist I feel much better and know I look better, my weight is irrelevant at this point. Obviously this depends on how over weight you are. Someone obese, monitoring their weight loss is easier and more important to start with.


    If you want to loose excess fat healthily, then a pound or two over a longer period is far better for you and easier to maintain rather than a crash diet. Weigh yourself now a few of times through the day, take an average, then do the same in two weeks time. If your average is a pound or two less than previously you are on the right track. Better still measure your waistline now then measure it again in a months time, if you are 1/2 - 1 inch less great. But at some point you need to find a healthy balance and concentrate on try to maintain that from a well managed healthy diet and physical activity.
    "Loose" is a different verb from "lose". Generally people speak of losing weight, not loosing it.
    yes my bad, I didn't bother to proof read it as I'm at work at the moment
    OK fair enough. Strangely this seems to be an increasingly common spelling mistake on these forums. I wonder if it is something to do with iPhone spellcheckers or something.
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  43. #42  
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post

    OK fair enough. Strangely this seems to be an increasingly common spelling mistake on these forums. I wonder if it is something to do with iPhone spellcheckers or something.
    It sure is. We are, Canutelike impotent against all this.

    Yesterday I had a conversation with the most amazing and rapid free associater with an incredible mastery of detail who nevertheless found time to slip in that the young (his children,I think he meant ) had forgotten how to spell with all the new gadgetry.(he was very "wordy" of phrase )

    Autocomplete has a lot to answer for. If you are a fumble-finger on a smartphone you may sometimes just have to go with the flow or just not post.

    Imagine Robbityrob1 ** depriving us and himself of a retort on account of a spelling slip...

    ** ironically it is/was Robittybob1
    Last edited by geordief; March 8th, 2018 at 06:46 AM.
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  44. #43  
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post

    OK fair enough. Strangely this seems to be an increasingly common spelling mistake on these forums. I wonder if it is something to do with iPhone spellcheckers or something.
    It sure is. We are, Canutelike impotent against all this.

    Yesterday I had a conversation with the most amazing and rapid free associater with an incredible mastery of detail who nevertheless found time to slip in that the young (his children,I think he meant ) had forgotten how to spell with all the new gadgetry.(he was very "wordy" of phrase )

    Autocomplete has a lot to answer for. If you are a fumble-finger on a smartphone you may sometimes just have to go with the flow or just not post.

    Imagine Robbityrob1 depriving us and himself of a retort on account of a spelling slip...
    Aha, a name to conjure with, indeed. But thank God he doesn't come here any more.
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  45. #44  
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    thanks sir
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  46. #45  
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    For lose weight or get good fitness healthy foods rich in protein and fiber are the best to eat because these foods take longer to digest and keep you feeling full longer...
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