Notices
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Young blood.

  1. #1 Young blood. 
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Reference : New Scientist, 23 August 2014, page 8

    Experiments on mice have shown that transferring blood from young mice into older mice confer a number of rejuvenating advantages. General health, cognition, cartilage appearing younger, fewer wrinkles, faster healing, stronger hearts, and possibly more. Such experiments are due to begin soon on humans, and it will be interesting to see if similar advantages can be conferred on older people. Old people with mild Alzheimers are likely to be the first target. However, a slightly weird experiment which involved human blood serum from young people injected into old mice seemed to have the same rejuvenating effect.

    A likely cause of this is a growth hormone called growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) which is present in young blood in higher concentrations. This is, of course, probably not the only thing in young blood that helps.

    Obviously, it is not going to be possible to give all old people young blood. The supply is too limited. But perhaps a synthetic version might be developed?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    I'm just starting to do a bit of reading on this topic you have posted, Skeptic. The following offers some interesting (at least to me) comments.

    The question is, what is it in the young blood that kicks healing back into high gear? Figuring that out will be a big challenge, because blood is a very complex substance. It's interesting that older blood actually makes younger animals heal more slowly; that suggests that the stem cells truly need something from the blood to work as well as they can.

    The researchers also found a clue in something called delta-proteins. Delta-proteins serve as a kind of molecular switch that seems to enhance healing and tissue repair. Normally, delta-proteins switch on in young tissue, but not in older tissue. In Rando's experiment, however, the young blood made delta-proteins switch on in older animals. So it's possible that delta-proteins are like receivers that take their orders from the bloodstream.

    What happens if scientists figure out how it all works? You might think that somewhere in young blood lies a Fountain of Youth, but Dr. Rando says that's unrealistic. First of all, while some tissues regenerate constantly, like blood and skin, and others repair themselves fairly quickly, like liver, muscle, and bone, many other tissues don't regenerate so well, even after an injury. The heart and the brain are two key examples. These organs probably would be fairly insensitive to any young-blood-based treatment.

    Furthermore, the effect of the young blood lasts only as long as the tissue is bathed in it. So, for example, it wouldn't help a 70-year-old to a full blood transfusion from a 20-year-old since his or her body would immediately start replacing the young blood with its own "old" blood. Dr. Rando says that if they do find the active chemicals in young blood that promote healing, it would have to be delivered directly to the tissue you wanted to fix, possibly several times a day. So, it's much more likely that this eventually could be used to help that 70-year-old's broken leg heal faster after a nasty fall.
    Young Blood - Science Updates - Science NetLinks


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    It would appear that experiments with 'young blood' are being fast-tracked to human trial, based on the long history of blood transfusions.

    Now, the final step giving young human blood plasma to older people with a medical condition is about to begin. Getting approval to perform the experiment in humans has been relatively simple, says Wyss-Coray, thanks to the long safety record of blood transfusions. He warns against swapping blood at home because transfusions need to be screened for disease, matched for blood type and the plasma needs to be separated out. "Certainly you can't drink the blood," he says. "Although obviously we haven't tried that experiment."
    So in early October, a team at Stanford School of Medicine will give a transfusion of blood plasma donated by people under 30 to older volunteers with mild to moderate Alzheimer's.
    Following the impressive results in animal experiments, the team hopes to see immediate improvements in cognition, but Wyss-Coray cautions that it is still very experimental. "We will assess cognitive function immediately before and for several days after the transfusion, as well as tracking each person for a few months to see if any of their family or carers report any positive effects," he says. "The effects might be transient, but even if it's just for a day it is a proof of concept that is worth pursuing."
    Young blood to be used in ultimate rejuvenation trial - health - 20 August 2014 - New Scientist
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. What does blood cancer do to blood cells?
    By aaisha_n in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: October 31st, 2013, 01:45 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 1st, 2012, 11:02 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: January 16th, 2011, 03:03 PM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 1st, 2010, 05:16 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 8th, 2007, 06:42 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •