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Thread: Is alkaline water actually dangerous or are they safe? Do they even work to make people healthy?

  1. #1 Is alkaline water actually dangerous or are they safe? Do they even work to make people healthy? 
    Forum Ph.D.
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    My parents recently got a water ionizing machine.
    I was wondering drinking alkaline water actually works with the body.

    After researching, and reading this article, I was stumped, thinking that 'alkaline water is an antioxidant' could just be a conspiracy just to sell their ionizers.

    Even Wikipedia has little/no detail on its medical research.

    Is there really little/no research on this?

    Or are there actually research that doesn't show results, and didn't get officially published?


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  3. #2  
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    There are much cheaper ways of making alkaline water. At the risk of increasing the hit rate, see this (hilarious) YouTube video. If you don't have any bicarb, don't worry, lemon juice will do!!

    How to make Alkaline Water - YouTube


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    My parents recently got a water ionizing machine.
    I was wondering drinking alkaline water actually works with the body.

    After researching, and reading this article, I was stumped, thinking that 'alkaline water is an antioxidant' could just be a conspiracy just to sell their ionizers.

    Even Wikipedia has little/no detail on its medical research.

    Is there really little/no research on this?

    Or are there actually research that doesn't show results, and didn't get officially published?
    The first article you link to, from "Purative", strikes me as confusing gobbldegook. The second (the Wiki one) seems sound but as you say uninformative. So perhaps it would be best to go back and ask what does this "ionizing" device claim to do to the water?

    From what I have found via a very quick web search of some apparently similar devices, is that some of them claim to separate acidic and alkaline components from your drinking water. This strikes me as unlikely to be true. I would have thought the most common alkaline components of water would be the carbonate and bicarbonate anions. I can't see how any ionisation process can separate these or concentrate them, since I would have thought it would act by discharging the ions at the electrodes, not by setting up any concentration gradient.

    Now, it IS possible to use ion exchange to soften water, of course. What this does is REPLACE Calcium and magnesium cations with sodium, leading to more soluble salts that do not precipitate on surfaces, or form scums with soap. But this has nothing to do with alkalinity, as the alkalinity is due to the anions present.

    So yes it all sounds dubious to me, but if we can see exactly what is claimed it may be easier to comment further.
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warron View Post
    There are much cheaper ways of making alkaline water. At the risk of increasing the hit rate, see this (hilarious) YouTube video. If you don't have any bicarb, don't worry, lemon juice will do!!

    How to make Alkaline Water - YouTube
    NOOOOO!!!! I watched that video and was appalled to see the suggestion that a lemon, - a LEMON, for Christ's sake! - will make water alkaline! This is chemical illiteracy of a high order. What you get from lemons is citric acid. So the pH of lemon juice is less than 7, about 2. That's why they taste sour.

    What is it with this ignorant mythology abroad today that claims lemons are alkaline. It is cretinous.

    More here: Amazing alkaline lemons? | the chronicle flask
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Warron View Post
    There are much cheaper ways of making alkaline water. At the risk of increasing the hit rate, see this (hilarious) YouTube video. If you don't have any bicarb, don't worry, lemon juice will do!!

    How to make Alkaline Water - YouTube
    NOOOOO!!!! I watched that video and was appalled to see the suggestion that a lemon, - a LEMON, for Christ's sake! - will make water alkaline! This is chemical illiteracy of a high order. What you get from lemons is citric acid. So the pH of lemon juice is less than 7, about 2. That's why they taste sour.

    What is it with this ignorant mythology abroad today that claims lemons are alkaline. It is cretinous.

    More here: Amazing alkaline lemons? | the chronicle flask
    Hehe. A quick test in my kitchen produced a pH of around 4.

    Some amazing comments in that blog you posted. People seem willing to believe things with absolutely no knowledge or understanding of the simplest 'basic' concepts of chemistry.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warron View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Warron View Post
    There are much cheaper ways of making alkaline water. At the risk of increasing the hit rate, see this (hilarious) YouTube video. If you don't have any bicarb, don't worry, lemon juice will do!!

    How to make Alkaline Water - YouTube
    NOOOOO!!!! I watched that video and was appalled to see the suggestion that a lemon, - a LEMON, for Christ's sake! - will make water alkaline! This is chemical illiteracy of a high order. What you get from lemons is citric acid. So the pH of lemon juice is less than 7, about 2. That's why they taste sour.

    What is it with this ignorant mythology abroad today that claims lemons are alkaline. It is cretinous.

    More here: Amazing alkaline lemons? | the chronicle flask
    Hehe. A quick test in my kitchen produced a pH of around 4.
    The first time I came across this was at a dinner party last year, where some woman seriously suggested lemons were alkaline. I'm afraid I did rather jump down her throat, as it seemed such an egregiously ignorant thing to say. But now I find it's all over the web, due to some dietary woo to do with alkaline ash - producing dietary ingredients. It's all ballocks.

    The general woo is accompanied by a nonsensical claim that blood pH is affected by diet - when anyone who knows any physiology is aware that homeostasis controls this extremely tightly, not least via breathing.

    AARGH!!
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  8. #7  
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    Yes, i was stumped when she said (in the video) about making alkaline water by using lemons........?

    some comments on that video says that the lemons are acidic, but have an alkaline effect on the body?

    is it true?

    can someone kindly explain how the oh- and h+ ions work between the lemon and the body? or is it a myth?
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    Yes, i was stumped when she said (in the video) about making alkaline water by using lemons........?

    some comments on that video says that the lemons are acidic, but have an alkaline effect on the body?

    is it true?

    can someone kindly explain how the oh- and h+ ions work between the lemon and the body? or is it a myth?
    It's a myth, don't believe a word of it. If you drink a lot of orange juice the excess citric acid will get filtered out by your kidneys. Your blood pH is controlled very closely indeed, to 7.4 +/- 0.02 or so, by a combination of your kidneys and your respiration (the dissolved carbon dioxide in your blood is acidic and the balance between that and bicarbonate can be altered by the amount of exhalation of carbon dioxide that you do.) cf. homeostasis on Wiki for example.

    There is a charlatan called Robert O Young in the USA who has made a fortune promoting some nonsense about disease being caused by the body becoming too acid. He doesn't believe in viruses! The guy should be locked up, really.
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    I agree with the previous poster that people who try to take advantage of others by making health claims (especially those that are completely off base) should be placed in jail. I am also interested in finding a more affordable way of getting my water back to the alkaline base point that I am aiming for.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry1 View Post
    I agree with the previous poster that people who try to take advantage of others by making health claims (especially those that are completely off base) should be placed in jail. I am also interested in finding a more affordable way of getting my water back to the alkaline base point that I am aiming for.
    But why are you aiming at an alkaline level for the water you drink, when there is no health benefit associated with it?
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  12. #11  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    My parents recently got a water ionizing machine.


    To bad, they were scammed into buying something they did not need. A reverse osmosis machine would have been better but even that isn't so great.
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    But why are you aiming at an alkaline level for the water you drink, when there is no health benefit associated with it?
    And isn't most "natural" water (spring / mineral water) very slightly acidic? So drinking "alkalinised" water would be "unnatural" and therefore "bad for you" (according to health nuts).

    This sounds as mad as people worrying there isn't enough oxygen in the atmosphere any more.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    Yes, i was stumped when she said (in the video) about making alkaline water by using lemons........?

    some comments on that video says that the lemons are acidic, but have an alkaline effect on the body?

    is it true?

    can someone kindly explain how the oh- and h+ ions work between the lemon and the body? or is it a myth?
    It's a myth, don't believe a word of it. If you drink a lot of orange juice the excess citric acid will get filtered out by your kidneys. Your blood pH is controlled very closely indeed, to 7.4 +/- 0.02 or so, by a combination of your kidneys and your respiration (the dissolved carbon dioxide in your blood is acidic and the balance between that and bicarbonate can be altered by the amount of exhalation of carbon dioxide that you do.) cf. homeostasis on Wiki for example.

    There is a charlatan called Robert O Young in the USA who has made a fortune promoting some nonsense about disease being caused by the body becoming too acid. He doesn't believe in viruses! The guy should be locked up, really.
    Seems like they are trying to lock him up.

    Cancer quack Robert O. Young is arrested and arraigned, but will he be convicted? – Respectful Insolence
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    But why are you aiming at an alkaline level for the water you drink, when there is no health benefit associated with it?
    And isn't most "natural" water (spring / mineral water) very slightly acidic? So drinking "alkalinised" water would be "unnatural" and therefore "bad for you" (according to health nuts).

    This sounds as mad as people worrying there isn't enough oxygen in the atmosphere any more.
    That depends. Water from limestone or chalk ("hard" water) is slightly alkaline while that from igneous rocks or peat ("soft" water) is a bit acid. Soft water makes better whisky, according to the Scots, I think. Not sure about beer. Soft water is better for washing in as you don't get scummy calcium stearate etc salts formed with soap, and for making tea, as you avoid scum due to calcium- tannin interactions. But hard water is less likely to leach the lead out of any old sections of lead pipe you have (as we do in my Victorian house in London).
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  16. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warron View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    Yes, i was stumped when she said (in the video) about making alkaline water by using lemons........?

    some comments on that video says that the lemons are acidic, but have an alkaline effect on the body?

    is it true?

    can someone kindly explain how the oh- and h+ ions work between the lemon and the body? or is it a myth?
    It's a myth, don't believe a word of it. If you drink a lot of orange juice the excess citric acid will get filtered out by your kidneys. Your blood pH is controlled very closely indeed, to 7.4 +/- 0.02 or so, by a combination of your kidneys and your respiration (the dissolved carbon dioxide in your blood is acidic and the balance between that and bicarbonate can be altered by the amount of exhalation of carbon dioxide that you do.) cf. homeostasis on Wiki for example.

    There is a charlatan called Robert O Young in the USA who has made a fortune promoting some nonsense about disease being caused by the body becoming too acid. He doesn't believe in viruses! The guy should be locked up, really.
    Seems like they are trying to lock him up.

    Cancer quack Robert O. Young is arrested and arraigned, but will he be convicted? Respectful Insolence
    That's the best news I've read this week.
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    i dont know who deleted my comments but here it is again you damn sheeple

    Moderator comment. I moved your other post to pseudoscience. Don't put your unsupported nonsense here. People expect science based information on a science forum.
    Last edited by Harold14370; May 17th, 2014 at 06:08 AM.
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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by wholeness View Post
    i dont know who deleted my comments but here it is again you damn sheeple

    Moderator comment. I moved your other post to pseudoscience. Don't put your unsupported nonsense here. People expect science based information on a science forum.
    Because what you posted is totally untrue, and we are lucky enough to have some quality control in this forum.

    P.S. I consider the use of cliched and abusive term "sheeple" to be evidence of an unreasonable crank.
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  19. #18  
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    How does the stomach regulate it's own pH if it goes too low?

    https://www.google.com/search?q=whic...kaline&spell=1

    Can't find data on google.

    Other than eating/drinking food/drinks to dilute/neutralize the stomach acid.
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  20. #19  
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    Regulation of Acid Secretion.
    When the pH of the stomach gets too low, somatostatin secretion is stimulated. Somatostatin inhibits acid secretion by direct effects on parietal cells, and also by inhibiting release of the positive regulators histamine and gastrin. The balance of activity of the different regulators changes as food is consumed and passes through different segments of the upper GI tract.
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