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Thread: Bone creation

  1. #1 Bone creation 
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    Hi all!My name is Alexander and I am a veteran soldier.Unfortunately I almost lost my right arm in a detonation,I prefer not to talk about it,but I will give minimal details:more than half of the radius forearm bone was removed(width-wise,so it's half as thick,or even less),so I can't use my right arm at all,I am like an amputee,a disabled person.My doctor said nothing could be done,but I made some research and I found out that with the help of BMPs and stem cells,new bone can be created.I think that by injecting BMPs into the desired region,localised growth can be achieved,or something like that.I will search for the links of the articles I have found about this and will post them here.Some scientists have created a jawbone in a laboratory,or some thing like that.So guys,be frank and honest with me:how is research going,is there any hope for me,or I will remain like this forever?I don't want to grow length-wise,but in cortical thickness,or how it is called.


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  3. #2  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Was this the news you had been hearing?

    A Bio-Patch Regrows Bone Inside the Body : Discovery News


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    Hey, I had a friend with a denerative bone condition in the spine, and I know he got some kind of new injection, from experimental work done in Germany, which caused the bone to regrow. Of course this was probably specific to his condition. Only a doctor knows what will work for you, but I know research is being done in this all the time... Every one thought my friend was doomed, and now he's doing great. So every day new methods are being discovered. I definately will pay for you to keep up with the research, and send any new credible findings to your doctor as you find them (in respectible journals)
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  5. #4 Well thanks guys! 
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    Thanks for dropping in guys,appreciate it!
    Flick,more or less.I heard of a human jawbone created in a laboratory,and some type of biodegradable scaffolding+BMP injected.I think we talk about the same thing,only there are different universities and groups studying this,at the same time,which is good.Here are the links:
    http ://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140410095651.htm
    http ://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090726150838.htm
    http ://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120514161616.htm
    http ://news.columbia.edu/record/1729
    What frightens me are the stem cells,and the fact that these "experiments" were more or less conducted on mice,or animals in general.I hope this will be available on humans as well in the near future,and it will be somehow safe.
    Trident,I hope your friend is doing great.Thanks for giving me hope,appreciate it.The spine is,I think the most complicated bone in the body,so if that can be regrown/reconstructed,so can long bones of the limbs,at least I hope.I wouldn't mind some info about the procedure,what they injected and what was the name of the hospital,doctor etc. if you have the time,it would be greatly appreciated.PM me,or even here,maybe others need this info too.
    Anyway,my doctor told me that there is no hope,that's because the bone lost it's size/mass in thickness/width,not in length.He said,that if the problem was length-wise there are procedures in China and India of limb-lenghtening(sounds bizarre).So at the moment my forearm bone is so thin,that if I would do a push-up or would punch a bag,it would simply break.I think I will change my doctor,any recommandations of good specialists in the domain are welcome,the country doesn't matter.I am really hopeful,and I hope that these procedures will be available on humans in the very near future(maybe they are already are,as Trident said as well,just I didn't found the right specialist yet).
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    I worked for a biopharmaceutical that created a BMP (Bone Morphogenetic Protein) and it helps produce missing segments of long bones and it helps repair vertebra. These were the two areas in which the FDA approved the drug.

    USArmy doctors also used it "off-label" (ie. not as approved by the FDA) in experiments on soldiers who lost serious amounts of bone, both the doctors and the patients figured there was nothing to lose by trying. As you say, it was used for axial loss of bone, and not radial loss. And the results were astonishing. Where before there was inches of missing bone, the doctors packed the void with BMP, and the body grew plenty of bone.

    You should be able to contact those doctors through the VA, and they might want to help you or they may refer you to a doctor who can.
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    I have read some of this information as well and it sounds interesting. I am wondering whether this is something that is actually possible or whether these are just speculative at this point. Considering the ordeal that you had to deal with, I would assume that you might be first in line when it comes to trying a new method.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrmonroe View Post
    I worked for a biopharmaceutical that created a BMP (Bone Morphogenetic Protein) and it helps produce missing segments of long bones and it helps repair vertebra. These were the two areas in which the FDA approved the drug.

    USArmy doctors also used it "off-label" (ie. not as approved by the FDA) in experiments on soldiers who lost serious amounts of bone, both the doctors and the patients figured there was nothing to lose by trying. As you say, it was used for axial loss of bone, and not radial loss. And the results were astonishing. Where before there was inches of missing bone, the doctors packed the void with BMP, and the body grew plenty of bone.

    You should be able to contact those doctors through the VA, and they might want to help you or they may refer you to a doctor who can.
    That sounds very interesting.Now I am sure that I need to change my doctor,because he told me literally NOTHING about this.This BMP sounds like the ultimate "thang",I mean it can make your bones bigger(I assume that by axial you meant width-wise),it is like something from the comics,almost too good to be true.
    Let's say that a skinny guy wakes up in the morning with the wish to become a big-boned "beast" of a man,he just contacts one of those doctors and thats it lol,the way science is advancing freightens me,but is also good for persons like me.
    As you said,maybe it isn't available for the large public,and if someone can access it and be the first in line would be the likes of me.I would appreciate your personal recommendation,because you worked in the domain,I will ask around obviously but I still appreciate a specialists recommendation on clinics,doctors etc(you can PM me if you have the time).
    @Barry I hope it's the actual PRESENT and not just some speculative thing in the near future,and based on what people say here and in those articles it may be available right as we speak.And,yeah,I went through some things but I'm still not comfortable with the idea of being an "experiment rat",if you know where I am getting.I hope though that it's not that perilous,but I have nothing to loose,I guess.
    As a side note,in the beginning of my research I just simply typed "bone growth" in Google,and some bodybuilding sites came up,and I was more than amazed that so many people tried to increase their frame and bone size and whatnot for cosmetical purposes(I thought bodybuilding was building moscle,but oh well).99 percent of the answers were like:"you're stuck with your frame" and "you can't grow bone" and things like that,and 1% were about HGH and IGF-1,that these compounds could promote bone growth etc.I gave up,saying that this is it,but then I found an article and the ball started rolling.So this is advice for anybody and everybody:don't give up,you never know when the sun will shine on you brother.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by aalex4128 View Post
    That sounds very interesting.Now I am sure that I need to change my doctor,because he told me literally NOTHING about this.This BMP sounds like the ultimate "thang",I mean it can make your bones bigger(I assume that by axial you meant width-wise),it is like something from the comics,almost too good to be true.
    Actually, by "axial", I meant length-wise (along the axis), and by "radially", I meant width-wise (spreading outward).

    I've searched to find some info, but come up blank. Maybe it's not public information.

    The bone loss that it healed was an inch or so missing from the humerus and other long bones. I saw the before-and-after x-rays. Very impressive. This experimentation was done at least five years ago. It was one of these shot-in-the-dark and may-as-well-give-it-a-try experiments because the doctors would probably have needed to amputate the limbs.

    Although I'm *very far* from being an expert with the drug or this experimental procedure, it seemed to work by creating bone *between* existing bone, if you see what I mean but that's just a amateur guess by me. I have no idea whether it would/wouldn't work for you, where new bone would grow outward. Don't take this as a yes or a no. Well, if it can only grow *between* existing bones, maybe it's a matter of bone growing along (axially) the remaining bone, bit-by-bit, from one joint to the other, because it seems that you have healthy ends of the radius the head that fits into the ball socket at the elbow and the hinge at the wrist, and it thins down somewhere in the middle.
    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
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  10. #9  
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    Important subjects to learn *more* about. You will need to become an amateur expert to discuss this with doctors and other professionals in detail and to convince them to help you.

    BMP
    Learn about Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP), the biopharmas that make them, their on-label uses (that is, what the FDA approves them for), and whatever off-label uses have been tried. These biopharmas may have other BMP products in their "pipelines".

    FIBRODYSPLASIA OSSIFICANS PROGRESSIVA (FOP)
    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is an extremely rare disease that causes muscles, tendons and ligaments to transform into bone. Excessive use of BMP may result in changes to muscles, tendons and ligaments that do the same thing.

    BONES
    Bones in adults do become thicker and stronger with use, which makes sense. One theory involves something called "microfractures" in bones caused by heavy usage. Bones respond to the microfractures by beefing themselves up.

    CALCIUM
    The body regulates calcium by monitoring the concentration of calcium in the blood because having calcium in the blood is very important. If the concentration is low, the body will draw calcium from the bones, making them weak (osteoporosis). This can happen to women during pregnancy. If the concentration is high, the body will store some of the calcium in the bones, making them stronger. Very high concentrations can cause kidney stones.

    FOREARM
    The ulna forms a simple hinge with the humerus and forms a "rotating" joint at the little finger side of the wrist. If this is not obvious, lay your forearm on the table and rotate your forearm back and forth from palm up to palm down, which will make it more obvious. The radius forms a hinge joint at thumb side of the wrist and a ball joint at the elbow. The ball joint allows the radius to rotate about its axis allowing the forearm to twist. The ulna does not rotate; the wrist rotates about the ulna.

    This is a simple drawing of the forearm and the interaction between the radius (3) and the bicep (9). Part of the bicep's tendon (4), although not shown completely, attaches onto the radial tuberosity, which is the "bump" on the radius shown in the drawing. As heavy use strengthens the bicep, its tendon thickens and the radial tuberosity grows larger to accommodate it. This generally occurs wherever tendons attach to bones.

    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrmonroe View Post
    Important subjects to learn *more* about. You will need to become an amateur expert to discuss this with doctors and other professionals in detail and to convince them to help you.

    BMP
    Learn about Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP), the biopharmas that make them, their on-label uses (that is, what the FDA approves them for), and whatever off-label uses have been tried. These biopharmas may have other BMP products in their "pipelines".

    FIBRODYSPLASIA OSSIFICANS PROGRESSIVA (FOP)
    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is an extremely rare disease that causes muscles, tendons and ligaments to transform into bone. Excessive use of BMP may result in changes to muscles, tendons and ligaments that do the same thing.

    BONES
    Bones in adults do become thicker and stronger with use, which makes sense. One theory involves something called "microfractures" in bones caused by heavy usage. Bones respond to the microfractures by beefing themselves up.

    CALCIUM
    The body regulates calcium by monitoring the concentration of calcium in the blood because having calcium in the blood is very important. If the concentration is low, the body will draw calcium from the bones, making them weak (osteoporosis). This can happen to women during pregnancy. If the concentration is high, the body will store some of the calcium in the bones, making them stronger. Very high concentrations can cause kidney stones.

    FOREARM
    The ulna forms a simple hinge with the humerus and forms a "rotating" joint at the little finger side of the wrist. If this is not obvious, lay your forearm on the table and rotate your forearm back and forth from palm up to palm down, which will make it more obvious. The radius forms a hinge joint at thumb side of the wrist and a ball joint at the elbow. The ball joint allows the radius to rotate about its axis allowing the forearm to twist. The ulna does not rotate; the wrist rotates about the ulna.

    This is a simple drawing of the forearm and the interaction between the radius (3) and the bicep (9). Part of the bicep's tendon (4), although not shown completely, attaches onto the radial tuberosity, which is the "bump" on the radius shown in the drawing. As heavy use strengthens the bicep, its tendon thickens and the radial tuberosity grows larger to accommodate it. This generally occurs wherever tendons attach to bones.

    Yeah man I understand what are you saying with the "amateur expert" thing.I not responded sooner because I was searching the country far and close for a specialist,but unfortunately found nothing.If you got some info on that,address,number,mail etc I would really appreciate a PM man.
    About the FOP,that's some scary sh*t man,never heard of that but your leg muscles becoming rigid and ossified and becoming paralyzed for life sounds pretty "fun",wow.Never know about the "beefing up of bones" thing.I thought they grow in puberty that's it.Although I heard of this http ://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microfracture_surgery I never gave it much thought.But if you say that these microfractures could thicken bones,than could this be a more easily available solution?Also,what activities could cause these microfractures,sports like weightlifting or swimming I guess?
    About the forearm,I am pretty surprised about the biceps and forearm tendon thickening.That means that weight bearing activity could be a partial solution to my problem.Thanks man for helping me,and I hope that I got right the things you tried to explain!Any helping tips are welcome,from you and anybody!
    Still hoping!
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  12. #11  
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    Hi Alex 4128,

    Probably this information would be interesting for you: On an untapped opportunity in medicine. Feel free to send me your comments to e-mail that you can find on the site.


    Last edited by Ruslan_Sharipov; June 26th, 2014 at 01:02 AM.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrmonroe View Post
    CALCIUM
    The body regulates calcium by monitoring the concentration of calcium in the blood because having calcium in the blood is very important. If the concentration is low, the body will draw calcium from the bones, making them weak (osteoporosis). This can happen to women during pregnancy. If the concentration is high, the body will store some of the calcium in the bones, making them stronger. Very high concentrations can cause kidney stones.
    I understand the metabolism draws calcium from bones to correct a low pH (high acid) condition, which may happen several times in a normal day. For metabolic purposes, bone is kinda like a fat reserve. And because your body prioritizes pH over bone mass, it will strip bones to spindles if necessary.

    The simple answer to healthy pH - that enables bone growth with calcium - is to eat more fruits and vegetables, and less meat and grains. This is different than stomach acidity.


    Titanium inserts are neat because for some reason the metal irresistibly tricks the body to coat it with bone cells. They'll "repair" the titanium more vigorously than your own bone fractures.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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