Notices
Results 1 to 42 of 42
Like Tree13Likes
  • 1 Post By Sealeaf
  • 1 Post By mat5592
  • 1 Post By dan hunter
  • 1 Post By adelady
  • 2 Post By mat5592
  • 3 Post By DogLady
  • 1 Post By adelady
  • 3 Post By adelady

Thread: Treatment of bacteria

  1. #1 Treatment of bacteria 
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    What other treatment options are available for bacterial infections, when antibiotics prove ineffective?


    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    984
    For bacterial infections if one antibiotic proves ineffective usually doctors try another one. Meanwhile, they would also be trying "supportive therapies" such as bed rest, vitamins, respiratory inhalations to maintain good oxygenation, possibly Oxygen therapy or even respiratory support. No, homeopathic remedies, various herbal and ancient orientel cures would not be used because there is no evidence any of these thing work at all.


    GoldenRatio likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Moderator Moderator Cogito Ergo Sum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    2,519
    Quote Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post
    What other treatment options are available for bacterial infections, when antibiotics prove ineffective?

    Member Sealeaf has offered a good answer, yet I would like to add two more options that are still in the experimental phase:
    Super E. coli to the rescue.
    New Antibiotics?
    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    If it is an infection like a wound one other treatment is packing the wound with sugar. Sugar is surpisingly effective as a topical antibiotic if you can keep it in place at a high concentration.
    A controlled model of moist wound heal... [J Exp Pathol (Oxford). 1990] - PubMed - NCBI
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Masters Degree mat5592's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    601
    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post
    What other treatment options are available for bacterial infections, when antibiotics prove ineffective?

    Member Sealeaf has offered a good answer, yet I would like to add two more options that are still in the experimental phase:
    Super E. coli to the rescue.
    New Antibiotics?
    In addition to this, viruses (bacteriophages) have been shown to be a potential option for treating bacterial infections.

    New Viruses To Treat Bacterial Diseases: 'My Enemies' Enemy Is My Friend' -- ScienceDaily
    Cogito Ergo Sum likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Moderator Moderator Cogito Ergo Sum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    2,519
    Quote Originally Posted by mat5592 View Post
    In addition to this, viruses (bacteriophages) have been shown to be a potential option for treating bacterial infections.

    New Viruses To Treat Bacterial Diseases: 'My Enemies' Enemy Is My Friend' -- ScienceDaily

    Could phage therapy also be effective against non-gastrointestinal bacterial infections?

    Quote Originally Posted by dan hunter View Post
    If it is an infection like a wound one other treatment is packing the wound with sugar. Sugar is surpisingly effective as a topical antibiotic if you can keep it in place at a high concentration.
    A controlled model of moist wound heal... [J Exp Pathol (Oxford). 1990] - PubMed - NCBI

    Could it not be so that the H2O2 (0.15% v/w) in the sugar paste caused the antiseptic property?
    Last edited by Cogito Ergo Sum; February 12th, 2014 at 12:46 PM.
    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Masters Degree mat5592's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    601
    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mat5592 View Post
    In addition to this, viruses (bacteriophages) have been shown to be a potential option for treating bacterial infections.

    New Viruses To Treat Bacterial Diseases: 'My Enemies' Enemy Is My Friend' -- ScienceDaily

    Could phage therapy also be effective against non-gastrointestinal bacterial infections?
    I would guess so, but I must admit that I have not read much about the approach. I can't think of any immediate reasons why it wouldn't be. I would expect it would also be much more specific than antibiotics, sparing a person's normal flora.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    I'm just curious, because I've had a chronic bacterial infection in my throat (for months), I've been placed on about 3-4 antibiotics and the pattern is always the same. I get no results after 2-3 days, then near the end of the course, the bacteria surges back ( I make this conclusion due to the reduction in mucus production, then it increases back to levels that were present before the antibiotics course). Kinda weird that so many courses just haven't worked, what infection could be so damn heavy, that it just doesn't go away?! GAHHHHH!
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    Could it not be so that the H2O2 (0.15% v/w) in the sugar paste caused the antiseptic property?
    Possibly both the peroxides and the dessication work together, it does not have to be just one or the other.
    Honey works too and there is a paper from the Asian Pacific Journal of Medicine that mentions the peroxides as well as the different levels of effectiveness.
    Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity
    Cogito Ergo Sum likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Masters Degree mat5592's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    601
    Quote Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post
    I'm just curious, because I've had a chronic bacterial infection in my throat (for months), I've been placed on about 3-4 antibiotics and the pattern is always the same. I get no results after 2-3 days, then near the end of the course, the bacteria surges back ( I make this conclusion due to the reduction in mucus production, then it increases back to levels that were present before the antibiotics course). Kinda weird that so many courses just haven't worked, what infection could be so damn heavy, that it just doesn't go away?! GAHHHHH!
    May I ask what they identified the bacteria as?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    The test results I got back simply stated it was heavy growth of upper respiratory tract flora, no pathogens isolated.
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    Hope you get better soon. Does gargling with salty water help at all?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    I've been gargling with listerine, kinda figured it would work just as well. Helped at first, now no effect.
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    new toothbrush?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,222
    Gargling with Listerine? With the kind of persistent problem you're suffering from, I'd go with twice or more daily gargles with saline solution. Seeing as this is certainly persistent and might be a bit serious, I'd also be inclined to buy medical grade saline from a pharmacy rather than making at home. You'd also be well advised to get one of those simple saline nasal sprays or drops (I hate using drops so I only ever get spray). If whatever problem you have is in your throat, you can bet anything you like that it's all through the nasal and sinus area as well.

    I wouldn't recommend the sinus "washing" procedure unless someone was absolutely sure that was the problem. It's ghastly and it doesn't work with just one go, it has to be done twice a day for several days to be sure you've dealt with it. (Don't look at this if you're easily made a bit squeamish Nasal irrigation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

    You say you're in Melbourne. That's a pretty arid environment in summer so regularly using a saline nasal spray might be helpful.

    One little side note. Recurring or persistent sinus / ENT infections can be a sign of a less than wonderful immune system. It's very often the first sign of underlying hormone/endocrine problems like an underactive thyroid. If you haven't had a blood test for that, it might be worth getting checked out at your next check up. (I once asked my doctor what on earth the connection could possibly be between thyroid deficiency and sinus infections. She said that the only connection was that sinus/ENT infections were the most common bacterial infections a GP sees in the first place - most are viral as a general rule. So if a person has a weakened immune system as people with hypothyroidism do, that's most likely to show up in frequent or persistent ENT infections.)
    scheherazade likes this.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    I did that terrible sinus 'washing' a few times. I've also used a nasal spray, it had no effect. It seems completely isolated in my throat, I've had no blocked nose or impairment to taste at all. No effect on breathing either, went to a regular Doctor a few times, every time my breathing was fine. Will try the saline solution gargle though, thanks.
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    I am not a doctor.
    Some other simple things that should not do any harm are gargling with a 3% peroxide solution and getting a new toothbrush (or boiling the one you have) to prevent reinfecting yourself. (do not use hair bleach, it is too strong unless you dilute it properly)
    Maybe you should consider stopping the mouthwash for a while because sometimes it can wipe out the bacteria that prevent Thrush or other yeast infections from getting a hold.

    If your doctors were looking for a bacteria as the cause they might have overlooked the possibility it is a fungus and there are a few of them that could give what you describe. They are not usually treated because your body usually gets over them all by itself.

    Remember though that I am not a doctor in any sense of the word and that if you die from following my advice it is not my fault in any way that anybody could possibly percieve no matter how insane or expensive of a lawyer they are.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    Wait, doesn't the fact that the test results say heavy growth of flora, mean it's a fungal infection? 0.o
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #19  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,222
    No. "Gut flora" refers to the assemblage of bacteria in the gut. "Mouth flora" (or throat or sinus ditto) means the assemblage of bacteria there.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #20  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    Oh :P
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #21  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Key West, Florida, Earth
    Posts
    4,788
    Couldn't It be possible to put a person in a dialysis machine and run the blood through it and transfuse that blood back into that person but having a infrared light in the machine to treat the blood as it travels through it thereby killing the bacteria. Bacteria die at 120 degrees.

    At What Temperature Does Bacteria Die?

    In general, bacterial cells die when they are exposed to a temperature of 70C for at least 15 seconds. In other cases, such as those for spores, the bacteria needs to be treated at a temperature of 120C for at least 30 minutes in order to die. Bacteria can live in extremes of temperatures and each species have specifications for treatment in order to be killed. Reference: www.ilri.org
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
    Reply With Quote  
     

  23. #22  
    Forum Masters Degree mat5592's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    601
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    Couldn't It be possible to put a person in a dialysis machine and run the blood through it and transfuse that blood back into that person but having a infrared light in the machine to treat the blood as it travels through it thereby killing the bacteria. Bacteria die at 120 degrees.

    At What Temperature Does Bacteria Die?

    In general, bacterial cells die when they are exposed to a temperature of 70C for at least 15 seconds. In other cases, such as those for spores, the bacteria needs to be treated at a temperature of 120C for at least 30 minutes in order to die. Bacteria can live in extremes of temperatures and each species have specifications for treatment in order to be killed. Reference: www.ilri.org
    I believe this has been discussed before here, and I'm still going to go with: no, not likely. Your red cells would hemolyze at that temperature and you would die.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  24. #23  
    Forum Freshman DogLady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    89
    Hyperthermia has been tried for various infections, shown to be ineffective and hazardous, and there is really no scientific basis for it to work. Temperatures that would kill most of the really nasty bacteria would also denature serum proteins and damage the blood cells. Trying to separate out the serum only, on such a large scale basis, is currently impractical and dangerous. It is done in small amounts to reduce certain autoantibodies in certain self-limited diseases (Guillian Barre, for one). The procedure is called plasmapheresis, which has some other uses. Dialysis is very hard on the body, the massive shifts in fluid volume causing strain on the heart. It is also costly, and the costs would be enormous for infections, considering how common serious infections are. Unfortunately, antibiotics, even dangerous ones, are still the most practical treatments available.

    Clarissa
    Reply With Quote  
     

  25. #24  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    Bring on the nanobots >
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  26. #25  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Key West, Florida, Earth
    Posts
    4,788
    Quote Originally Posted by mat5592 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    Couldn't It be possible to put a person in a dialysis machine and run the blood through it and transfuse that blood back into that person but having a infrared light in the machine to treat the blood as it travels through it thereby killing the bacteria. Bacteria die at 120 degrees.

    At What Temperature Does Bacteria Die?

    In general, bacterial cells die when they are exposed to a temperature of 70C for at least 15 seconds. In other cases, such as those for spores, the bacteria needs to be treated at a temperature of 120C for at least 30 minutes in order to die. Bacteria can live in extremes of temperatures and each species have specifications for treatment in order to be killed. Reference: www.ilri.org
    I believe this has been discussed before here, and I'm still going to go with: no, not likely. Your red cells would hemolyze at that temperature and you would die.
    I keep trying even though at times forget.
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
    Reply With Quote  
     

  27. #26  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    1,839
    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    For bacterial infections if one antibiotic proves ineffective usually doctors try another one. Meanwhile, they would also be trying "supportive therapies" such as bed rest, vitamins, respiratory inhalations to maintain good oxygenation, possibly Oxygen therapy or even respiratory support. No, homeopathic remedies, various herbal and ancient orientel cures would not be used because there is no evidence any of these thing work at all.
    I want to suggest that maybe we are forgetting that everything primarily comes from the plant world. I will guarantee, that there are endless plants that work better than unnatural chemically based ones. When everything else fails, plants will be there.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  28. #27  
    Genius Duck Dywyddyr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Scunthorpe, UK
    Posts
    11,966
    Quote Originally Posted by Stargate View Post
    I will guarantee, that there are endless plants that work better than unnatural chemically based ones.
    Citation needed.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
    Reply With Quote  
     

  29. #28  
    Forum Masters Degree mat5592's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    601
    Quote Originally Posted by Stargate View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    For bacterial infections if one antibiotic proves ineffective usually doctors try another one. Meanwhile, they would also be trying "supportive therapies" such as bed rest, vitamins, respiratory inhalations to maintain good oxygenation, possibly Oxygen therapy or even respiratory support. No, homeopathic remedies, various herbal and ancient orientel cures would not be used because there is no evidence any of these thing work at all.
    I want to suggest that maybe we are forgetting that everything primarily comes from the plant world. I will guarantee, that there are endless plants that work better than unnatural chemically based ones. When everything else fails, plants will be there.
    So...what compels these plants to make better antibiotics than our brains ever could?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  30. #29  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    Is no thread safe? *rolls eyes*
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  31. #30  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,222
    I want to suggest that maybe we are forgetting that everything primarily comes from the plant world. I will guarantee, that there are endless plants that work better than unnatural chemically based ones. When everything else fails, plants will be there.

    http://img33.glitterfy.com/12117/gli...958T831D30.gif
    Curiosity likes this.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  32. #31  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    1,839
    Quote Originally Posted by mat5592 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Stargate View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    For bacterial infections if one antibiotic proves ineffective usually doctors try another one. Meanwhile, they would also be trying "supportive therapies" such as bed rest, vitamins, respiratory inhalations to maintain good oxygenation, possibly Oxygen therapy or even respiratory support. No, homeopathic remedies, various herbal and ancient orientel cures would not be used because there is no evidence any of these thing work at all.
    I want to suggest that maybe we are forgetting that everything primarily comes from the plant world. I will guarantee, that there are endless plants that work better than unnatural chemically based ones. When everything else fails, plants will be there.
    So...what compels these plants to make better antibiotics than our brains ever could?
    I do not know, it might be just adaptation.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  33. #32  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,416
    Quote Originally Posted by Stargate View Post
    I do not know, it might be just adaptation.
    Or some crap you swallowed from somewhere (trusted elder, witch, infomercial, pseudoscience web site) but never applied a skeptical eye towards.

    While there are certainly many modern pharma which derive from plants, it's still generally better to take a couple aspirin which is a controlled safety checked dose than boil up some willow twigs into a tea (though I'd do it in a survival situation) which you'll an unknown dose along with other possible effects that aren't so good (a stomach ache from the acids for starters).
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    The Holy Land is everywhere Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  34. #33  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,840
    My advice to Curiosity is to try another doctor. If the problem cannot be fixed with his therapies, maybe he has got something wrong. In fact, I would try to see a specialist. Say an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist. Get the tests re-done. Make damn sure you know what the problem is.

    Just on the earlier suggestion of a sugar solution. Yes, but not for the throat. An old remedy was honey. This has to be applied to the site of the infection, and only works in direct contact. There are two reasons it works.
    1. It uses osmosis to dehydrate bacteria, and thus kill them.
    2. Bees add a preservative to honey, which also kills bacteria.

    If you can get hold of it, manuka honey works even better than other honeys. The reason is that the manuka tree has, in its nectar, a chemical that acts as a bacteria killer. But again, it only works in direct physical contact with the infected site.

    Honeys have been used very successfully as poultices in contact with infected wounds or ulcers.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  35. #34  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    I have been on another thread where medical advice was asked for.
    John Galt tried pointing out that the only answer should be to go see a doctor.

    When that was ignored he shut the thread.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  36. #35  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    Will look for a specialist, sounds like a plan.
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  37. #36  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,222
    I have been on another thread where medical advice was asked for.
    John Galt tried pointing out that the only answer should be to go see a doctor.

    When that was ignored he shut the thread.
    A few things worth noting.

    On this thread it's quite obvious the person has been seeing a doctor, otherwise there would have been no antibiotic prescriptions in the first place.

    And the person has a professional medical diagnosis even though it's turned out a bit unsatisfactory with unsuccessful treatment.

    This
    person is not resisting the idea of seeing a doctor as some others do.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  38. #37  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,676
    Feeling pain in the throat could be residual damage from the recent attack at your mucous membranes. It could also be that your nerve endings have been affected and transmit pain unwittingly. Have you still got swelling in your throat, redness, maybe holes in the membrane of your throat?

    Sometimes the best thing you could do is absolutely nothing at all. Saline could dissolve the membrane that was supposed to protect you. Only use it to wash away excess bacteria. You can't wash them away when the membrane is barely there. In short, the gargling doesn't work anymore because your throat no longer has mucus protecting it. You should try drinking glycoproteins, sugar and norrit in a mix, wait a few hours, then gargle with saline. This should build up the mucus, then wash it out.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
    Reply With Quote  
     

  39. #38  
    Moderator Moderator Cogito Ergo Sum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    2,519
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    If you can get hold of it, manuka honey works even better than other honeys. The reason is that the manuka tree has, in its nectar, a chemical that acts as a bacteria killer. But again, it only works in direct physical contact with the infected site.

    Honeys have been used very successfully as poultices in contact with infected wounds or ulcers.

    For those who wish to read more about this:
    Kwakman, P.H.S. et al. (2011), "Two Major Medicinal Honeys Have Different Mechanisms of Bactericidal Activity", PLoS One 6(3)

    For those who do not wish to read an entire paper:
    "We therefore assessed the rapid and slow bactericidal activity of RS [Revamil Source] and manuka honey, i.e. the activity after 2 and 24 hours of incubation, respectively. RS honey had much more potent rapid activity than manuka honey against B. subtilis [food-spoiling bacterium], E. coli and P. aeruginosa [both wound pathogens]. Both RS and manuka honey lacked rapid activity against MRSA. With respect to slow bactericidal activity, manuka honey was more potent than RS honey, most notably against MRSA and B. subtilis. (...)

    The main conclusion is that these honeys exert bactericidal activity through entirely different sets of compounds, resulting in distinct bactericidal properties. MGO
    [methylglyoxal] contributed substantially to the activity of manuka honey against S. aureus and B. subtilis but not against E. coli and P. aeruginosa. The activity against these latter bacteria involved compounds other than MGO including as yet unidentified cationic and non-cationic compounds."


    Notes between square brackets and bold added by me.
    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  40. #39  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    Actually, the only problem I face from this, Zwolver, is excess mucus. It's constantly building up in my throat, it's annoying and makes it harder to sleep at night.
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  41. #40  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,676
    Ok, using salt works then, trying a slight acidic solution might work even better then (bubble water with a lime).
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
    Reply With Quote  
     

  42. #41  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,840
    Salt, sugar, honey etc all work as anti-bacterials. Problem is that putting them down the old throat may not aid overall health, and it passes the affected area so quickly that it probably does no good, anyway.

    If you are going to insist on applying useless disinfectants via the oral route, why not try neat whisky? It is also a disinfectant, and probably useless, but it makes you feel good!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  43. #42  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,222
    it passes the affected area so quickly that it probably does no good, anyway.
    You can learn to gargle a mixture for a couple of minutes at a time. It's easier if you are, or have been, a singer, but you can learn to do it.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Possible cancer treatment
    By Suhail Jalbout in forum Pseudoscience
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: September 1st, 2013, 10:56 PM
  2. Looking for Vitiligo Treatment ???
    By kumail in forum Health & Medicine
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: August 23rd, 2010, 03:56 AM
  3. Treatment of spilled acid
    By Cytosine12 in forum Chemistry
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: July 29th, 2009, 09:32 AM
  4. Wastewater treatment
    By andrefonsecaa in forum Environmental Issues
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: July 12th, 2009, 03:26 PM
  5. iodine treatment
    By AlexP in forum Biology
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: October 18th, 2006, 08:48 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •