Notices
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Wind Turbine Syndrome

  1. #1 Wind Turbine Syndrome 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Black Forest
    Posts
    21
    It turns out that while wind turbines may be good for the environment, they may not be good for human health. "In 2011, a doctor at Harvard Medical School diagnosed Hobart with wind turbine syndrome, which is not recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."

    Example of a couple in Cape Cod.

    Although it's not recognized by the CDC&P, that's no surprise, as official recognition usually lags observation of new phenomenon, especially when they're induced by modern technology. As an example, I recall the stink of carpel tunnel syndrome a few decades back. It took a while before the medical industry stopped ignoring that one and gave it the attention it deserved.

    I was surprised to see a CBS News article actually discussing things such as sample sizes, control groups, and peer reviews. Although Pierpont's research has been somewhat discredited, that doesn't mean the issue isn't real, particularly as this issue is surfacing in other locations where giant windmills are in close proximity to residential areas. All the benefits, such as "In three years of operation, it has prevented emissions of more than 7,000 tons of carbon dioxide from conventional generation plants" are pointless if the issue is that they're being erected too close to residences and the chronic whump-whump-whump is causing medical problems and driving them off their lands.

    As an aviator I have zero sympathy for idiots who build or buy near an airport then complain about the noise. Caveat emptor. I grew up near an airport, which had a lot to do with my chosen profession. I was never bothered by the road of jets flying overhead. I also spent three years near an Army base with an active artillery range. It wasn't operated all that often, perhaps two days a week, but when it was, the crump-crump of the artillery could certainly be felt and heard inside our house.

    The difference, however, is that the crumps were neither constant nor rythmic. They were largely random, and most of the time they weren't there are all. The jet noise was even less of a problem, as it slowly built, then slowly died.

    I cannot imagine what it would be like to be subjected to a never-ending whump-whump-whump-whump-whump, and can very well imagine how that intrusion could play havoc with various systems in the body. We know for a fact that flashing lights can trigger epileptic seizures, and that repetitive sounds can lead to other physiological problems.

    Thus, I find the idea of "wind turbine syndrome" isn't far-fetched at all.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    Interesting. Since the noise is of constant volume and frequency, I'd like to see what active noise control would do to the symptoms in the lady in your link.


    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Ascended Member Ascended's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,370
    Sounds like it could be worthy of further investigation, but what really struck me from the article was this line "Months earlier, in the summer of 2010, three wind turbines had been erected in her town, one of which runs around the clock, 1,600 feet from her home.", I don't think I've come across any being built quite so close to residential housing.
    Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it. - confucius
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,225
    the chronic whump-whump-whump
    Did they have someone reconstruct a defunct design from the 80s near their house? The noise most modern ones make, when you can hear it, is more like a varying whoooosh.

    The biggest issue with claims of health problems from turbines is referred to in this piece ... https://theconversation.com/wind-tur...nt-story-18241

    In a 2012 Ontario legal case, complainants were asked to provide their medical records going back a decade before the local wind farm commenced operation. This would have provided relevant information about any pre-existing health problems. When they failed to so, their case failed.
    You can hear the noise, or lack of it, in the background of parts of the video. Waubra - The Way the Wind Blows - Victorian Wind Alliance

    The other thing that I'm never quite sure of with the turbine syndrome nonsense is, how does it differ from constant or intermittent traffic noise.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Black Forest
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Interesting. Since the noise is of constant volume and frequency, I'd like to see what active noise control would do to the symptoms in the lady in your link.
    Plausible. Might require a whole-house system for the low-frequency effect of a major wind turbine.

    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    the chronic whump-whump-whump
    Did they have someone reconstruct a defunct design from the 80s near their house? The noise most modern ones make, when you can hear it, is more like a varying whoooosh.
    Au contraire! Depends entirely on the wind velocity, wind direct angle of incidence to the rotational plane, blade angle, blade speed, and blade design. Even the best designs can whump-whump-whump with the best of them, given the right conditions.

    Which reminds me... All are controlled via microprocessor. Change a few variables and you might sacrifice 5%, but eliminate conditions which produce a whump.

    The biggest issue with claims of health problems from turbines is referred to in this piece ... https://theconversation.com/wind-tur...nt-story-18241
    Anecdotal. Just because it doesn't happen with their location at their windmills doesn't imply that it's not happening at the Cape Cod location.

    The other thing that I'm never quite sure of with the turbine syndrome nonsense is, how does it differ from constant or intermittent traffic noise.
    By "nonsense" am I correct in assuming you've already made up your mind about the issue, that you're dismissing evidence based upon your belief? Hardly scientific...

    As for traffic noise, that's much higher frequency. Blade rotations cause very low-frequency pulses we cannot hear, but nonetheless can play havoc with an individual's vestibular system.

    As for whether or not the phenomenon is real, a simple visit to the site could provide confirmation. The lawyer, Mannal, did just that: "It goes all day and night. My initial take was that [she] was being a hypochondriac, but I went to their house two years ago with a little skepticism and within 10 minutes of being in the house, I could feel it and hear it. ... It acts like a drum and pounds on the house." Is he lying to support his clients? Again, a simple visit...

    That it's happening in other areas indicates the issue isn't a fluke, and that the potential that it's real is high. The question is, if it is indeed real, then what? Keep plunking down wind farms regardless of the consequences? Perhaps require a minimum distance? Noise pollution is already covered under some EPA guidelines, and OSHA has plenty of research on low-frequency effects on humans.

    What if it's only affecting some people? At what percentage do we take action? 1%? 20%? A majority? What percentage of people being affected has historically been required for other environmental pollution, like smog and PCBs (or whatever used to be used in transformers)?

    I think their lawyer stated it best: "The heart of the issue is that they have been pushed off their land," said Mannal. "They have erected these enormous industrial-scale turbines -- larger than a 747 -- in close proximity to residences. They have had to leave their house because they couldn't live there anymore."

    What would you do in that situation? Stay and suffer for the cause of pro-environmental wind energy? Sell and tell the buyer? Sell and not tell the buyer? Stay and sue?

    At what point do the environmental benefits outweigh the environmental noise pollution?

    As a pilot, I'm well aware of the issues of noise pollution. Many of our arrival and departure routes are specifically designed with noise abatement procedures in mind.

    I'm also all for progress, but not at the expense of people's health, as that sort of falls under the category of "the operation was a success, but the patient died."

    Do you agree? Yes, no, and why?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    794
    I have worked for half year in a place where there was an industrial fan almost whole time on... normaly I forgot about it each day but once a day it turned of... (don't know reason why) but when it turned of I understand in what noisy place we stood the whole day...and it felt much better that way... how risky it was? I dontknow... how much does it differ from other daily noises? would be my question
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,225
    By "nonsense" am I correct in assuming you've already made up your mind about the issue, that you're dismissing evidence based upon your belief? Hardly scientific...
    You're new here so I'll overlook it this time. Accusing people of sticking to belief rather than evidence on the basis of a single comment ina single discussion - not a good plan.

    The better, politer, thing to do is to ask.

    In this case, ask whether the person has any evidence to back up their view.

    .......

    Thanks for asking, I'll look it up. (I haven't got it bookmarked.)
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Wind turbine how does it work?
    By Fmp2491 in forum Mechanical, Structural and Chemical Engineering
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: July 25th, 2011, 10:00 AM
  2. Wind turbine power
    By motorcycleman in forum Electrical and Electronics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: November 17th, 2008, 04:55 PM
  3. Power from a wind turbine
    By motorcycleman in forum Physics
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: November 11th, 2008, 09:27 PM
  4. Maglev wind Turbine
    By timel in forum Mechanical, Structural and Chemical Engineering
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: August 31st, 2008, 03:58 PM
  5. Wind turbine manufacturing.
    By Bunbury in forum Mechanical, Structural and Chemical Engineering
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: March 9th, 2008, 12:30 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •