Notices
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 101 to 133 of 133
Like Tree80Likes

Thread: taking multivitamins

  1. #101  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    A multi-vitamin is pretty harmless.
    No, more. A steady dose of multivitamins demonstrably prevents many diseases, and generally promotes good physical development and health. The paradox here is that the same is true for any artificial support, which we know tend to weaken an organism's natural ability to maintain homeostasis (e.g. crave the specific nutrients it needs). One could argue that people's respiration isn't quite optimal when they're speaking, so tweaking the air mix in a room is good for them. But you see where that leads.

    Speaking of vitamin D. Ever heard of Snowbirds? These are Canadians who vacation in winter to bask under tropical skies. They feel it recharges them. The practice began back when Canadians all looked forward to the oranges we'd get around Christmastime. This is about intuitive homeostasis, and healthy cravings. If you dose the Canadians with vitamins, how will their cravings change?
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #102  
    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,114
    Quote Originally Posted by Pong View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    A multi-vitamin is pretty harmless.
    No, more. A steady dose of multivitamins demonstrably prevents many diseases, and generally promotes good physical development and health. The paradox here is that the same is true for any artificial support, which we know tend to weaken an organism's natural ability to maintain homeostasis (e.g. crave the specific nutrients it needs). One could argue that people's respiration isn't quite optimal when they're speaking, so tweaking the air mix in a room is good for them. But you see where that leads.

    Speaking of vitamin D. Ever heard of Snowbirds? These are Canadians who vacation in winter to bask under tropical skies. They feel it recharges them. The practice began back when Canadians all looked forward to the oranges we'd get around Christmastime. This is about intuitive homeostasis, and healthy cravings. If you dose the Canadians with vitamins, how will their cravings change?
    I won't argue that a good diet and proper exercise is not the best course of action. But in a lot situations that is not possible for various reasons and it's not always possible to know where you might be deficient. Sometimes I would take a multivitamin for two or 3 months then stop. However, I do know I was very deficient in vitamin D, and I've been able to tell with out a doubt that taking the 5000iu daily supplements has made a big difference to the way my brain is working now. My memory is much better and I'm able to hold my attention longer. Also, I don't believe I was getting enough Omega 3 in my diet so I take daily supplements and I also believe they are making a difference to how I feel.

    Next, not all vitamins are made equal, some are much better than others. So doing a lot of research and sometimes checking out more than one product is a big help. If you take a supplement for 2 to 3 months and you can't tell if you feel better or not, then it's probably not helping much and is a waste of money. Many companies make there supplements from natural substances which usually means they will be absorbed into your body better.
    babe likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #103  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,309
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    Lynx

    You still have an assumption built in : that the multivitamins are taken in low dose. Experience shows this is not true. The studies I referenced earlier show that, on average, those who take multivitamins live shorter lives than those who don't. This may be due to over-dosing, but it is a real phenomenon.
    You didn't post a study. You posted a new article that didn't even bother to cite a meta study and was largely dismissed by the very experts the journalist asked about the sensationalised study.

    Recommend you find at least the abstract so we might see what the actual study says.
    --
    Meanwhile here's another study of vitamins that didn't remote a negative effect:
    Vitamin C, Vitamin E, and Multivitamin Supplement Use and Stomach Cancer Mortality in the Cancer Prevention Study II Cohort

    There are dozens of similar studies which don't show problems in the relative low dose multivitamins. This is exactly more medical professional groups aren't concerned and often recommend them. If you need them, it might help, there's no evidence that they do harm. Only at maga doses to most doctors get concerned.
    --
    There's are limits to human bodies ability to adapt. The reality is we evolved in in the Africa rift valley but in large part live in completely difference environments of biotic and abiotic effects.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #104  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    12,440
    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    Iron compounds are just plain difficult to digest. They are quite toxic. The high strength prenatal vitamin that an obstrtician might priscribe for a pregnant woman might kill a toddler.
    Hell I took them for both babies!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #105  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    12,440
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    Lynx

    You still have an assumption built in : that the multivitamins are taken in low dose. Experience shows this is not true. The studies I referenced earlier show that, on average, those who take multivitamins live shorter lives than those who don't. This may be due to over-dosing, but it is a real phenomenon.
    You didn't post a study. You posted a new article that didn't even bother to cite a meta study and was largely dismissed by the very experts the journalist asked about the sensationalised study.

    Recommend you find at least the abstract so we might see what the actual study says.
    --
    Meanwhile here's another study of vitamins that didn't remote a negative effect:

    Vitamin C, Vitamin E, and Multivitamin Supplement Use and Stomach Cancer Mortality in the Cancer Prevention Study II Cohort

    There are dozens of similar studies which don't show problems in the relative low dose multivitamins. This is exactly more medical professional groups aren't concerned and often recommend them. If you need them, it might help, there's no evidence that they do harm. Only at maga doses to most doctors get concerned.
    --
    There's are limits to human bodies ability to adapt. The reality is we evolved in in the Africa rift valley but in large part live in completely difference environments of biotic and abiotic effects.
    I just read and wish I had kept the URL about a new study has proven that a certain dosage of Vitamin E is very beneficial for ALZ patients.

    I think we just need to use our common sense. Take what you might need, and don't overdo! I, need a supplement of "D", and I live in the tropics, and that is per my doctor and blood tests.

    We are all different. Isn't that what makes each of us special?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #106  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    If you take a supplement for 2 to 3 months and you can't tell if you feel better or not, then it's probably not helping much and is a waste of money.
    That's living exactly as you're "designed" to. Because omnivores instinctively experiment to learn which foods satiate their various needs. Otherwise they're eating just by flavour and appearance, and they die.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #107  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,225
    I just read and wish I had kept the URL about a new study has proven that a certain dosage of Vitamin E is very beneficial for ALZ patients.
    That dosage is very high. You wouldn't want to take that much vit E without specific medical advice and continuing supervision.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #108  
    who sees through things
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    UK now, US before
    Posts
    269
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    You can get much better and much safer insurance, and better health, by eating a balanced diet. If the foods for this are not readily available, then grow them. There are any number of health giving veges that grow very well in pots, with a little watering.
    What an arrogant thing to say. There are people whose shopping carts are filled with white bread, pototatoes and cheap cakes not because they don't understand the importance of a balanced diet, but because that's all they can afford to keep from going hungry. Sadly, these people can't afford vitamins either.

    Do you think someone living in a tiny flat with little direct sunlight can grow enough fruits and vegetables to sustain a healthy diet? Does someone working long hours because they are trying to survive on a minimum wage job or someone caring for a child or sick relative have time for this?

    Not everyone can afford to see a doctor because they're feeling fatigued or dizzy or getting recurring headaches, whether it is because of lack of money or lack of time.

    I would love to holiday in Spain every winter and get my D3 that way, but I can't afford it.
    adelady and Bad Robot like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #109  
    who sees through things
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    UK now, US before
    Posts
    269
    Quote Originally Posted by Pong View Post

    Speaking of vitamin D. Ever heard of Snowbirds? These are Canadians who vacation in winter to bask under tropical skies. They feel it recharges them. The practice began back when Canadians all looked forward to the oranges we'd get around Christmastime. This is about intuitive homeostasis, and healthy cravings. If you dose the Canadians with vitamins, how will their cravings change?
    I was once pregnant but had an early miscarriage. I had already moved to the UK, but this was before I knew I was Vitamin D deficient. When I was pregnant, I craved sunlight like other pregnant women are supposed to crave certain foods. I used to stand with my nose pressed to the window.

    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    You wouldn't want to take that much vit E without specific medical advice and continuing supervision.
    Vit E is a blood-thinner. I can handle the small amount found in normal multivitamins, but can't manage anything more. I bleed too easily.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #110  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Alec Bing View Post
    When I was pregnant, I craved sunlight like other pregnant women are supposed to crave certain foods. I used to stand with my nose pressed to the window.
    I love that. I'd really like to know what makes pregnant women hypersensitive to their nutrient needs. Perhaps we could activate that in people who've become lost in the superficial qualities of foods. Healthy cravings are the best because you actually enjoy satiating them. Mmm this parsley is delicious.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #111  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    12,440
    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    I just read and wish I had kept the URL about a new study has proven that a certain dosage of Vitamin E is very beneficial for ALZ patients.
    That dosage is very high. You wouldn't want to take that much vit E without specific medical advice and continuing supervision.
    I don't take it at all. It was merely a comment on a study researched and proven that Vitamin E has been proven to be of help with ALZ patients.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #112  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Some Antioxidants Linked with Shorter Life | LiveScience

    Another reference to the fact that studies show multivitamins can shorten lives, rather than improve health. Vitamin supplements are primarily designed to fatten the wallets of the companies making vitamin supplements, and those who spend money on those vitamins, if they have no special need, are simply suckers.

    And Alec, when I suggest growing veges, I am not being arrogant. I know people who live in restricted places (including my nephew in shanghai) who have a couple pots just inside the windows of their apartments, growing parsley, or other green veges, to supplement their diets. That advice is not arrogance but good solid common sense.

    If a person is otherwise healthy, and buys multivitamins, he or she is literally pissing their money away, because all it does is create expensive urine, and according to a number of studies, is probably shortening their lives.

    If you have a special need, such as living in semi-darkness in the northern winter requiring vitamin D, or a pregnant woman requiring folic acid, or a vegan needing vitamin B12, then that is fine. But if you are a healthy person, then you should focus on a balanced diet, growing a few veges if necessary, rather than harming your health with unnecessary and damaging vitamin supplements.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #113  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,305
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    when I suggest growing veges, I am not being arrogant.
    We know, but it sounds that way. It's the sort of thing lifestyle-conscious foodies say - "let them eat kale". Alec Bing makes a good point that drudges subsisting on gross calories and proteins obviously lack the time/energy/spirit to get active at the community garden on their way home from yoga. And if eating celery actually causes weight loss, it's the last thing hungry people should put in their mouths. Then supermarket sprouts are a waste of money better spent on bulk pasta.

    I find it interesting how poor people home in on characteristic eating patterns, despite society urging them otherwise. I don't quite understand the economic/metabolic equation they arrive at, but assume they've got it figured out, if only "figured out" by the natural selection of hard knocks. What's up with all that cheese and tomato sauce? Have nutritionists ever done a study from the impoverished point-of-view: how to subsist by supermarkets using the least money?

    Vitamin supplements come into this, because, recognizing the "junk" foods poor folk eat, we've been stealthily adding nutrients to those foods. Like iron in flour. Or the niacin in corn products (I think that one's mandatory). Or fortified and enriched breakfast cereals, indispensable to every poor household with children. Wouldn't that lead to dependence? Or at least a poor taste for foods that naturally answer those deficiencies?


    Sorry for the pet theory rant.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #114  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Pong

    I was responding to several people who claimed that lots of people live in places where they cannot buy healthy foods, because those healthy foods are not found in local stores. I find that hard to believe, but I do not want to call anyone a liar, and they might be correct. So I suggested that, for those few people, growing veges is a healthy alternative. It is really easy to do. You can grow chard, for example, in an old paint pot, with a couple handfulls of dirt, and a couple handfulls of organic litter scooped from a gutter. Stick the seed in and water regularly. End result will be an abundance of chard which is a very healthy vegetable. The paint pot(s) can be put inside a window of an apartment, and it will produce just as much healthy food. Parsley will also grow very well treated this way. Plus other veges.

    It is also worth remembering that frozen vegetables are an excellent alternative. If you buy and eat frozen peas, or frozen mixed veges, you get almost as many vitamins as with garden fresh equivalents.

    With home grown chard/parsley etc., and frozen veges as alternatives to a rich supply of greengrocer veges, there is no excuse to have to fall back on vitamin pills.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #115  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,309
    No one is going to grow enough green in their apartment window to make a noticeable difference to their diet--assuming they even have a sunny apartment window or two--millions of Americans don't live with such "luxuries." The lack of quality food is a real issue in the US, and in many other places where it is available it is quite expensive in the winter months, frozen food is not much of a cost savings either--another 25-50% increase in food bills is more than many poor families can handle (recent cuts to government help for food aren't helping).

    The societal pressure comment I found odd. In the US many of the same neighborhoods where most of the cultural pressure is towards unhealthy choices, doctors with time to provide nutritional advise of any kind exceedingly uncommon even when available (most times it's too expensive for poor people anyhow).
    Bad Robot and babe like this.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #116  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    12,440
    I use to have a garden, but I am not here to plant it anymore.......though, out of guilt...I'll plant something just to watch it grow!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #117  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    poor people home in on characteristic eating patterns, despite society urging them otherwise
    The societal pressure comment I found odd. In the US many of the same neighborhoods where most of the cultural pressure is towards unhealthy choices
    Sorry, I'm writing from Vancouver, a real nexus for overseas produce, and food snobs. In my low-income neighbourhood the locals actually protested McDonalds out... now that building's a gym I kid you not. I shouldn't assume conditions are the same everywhere.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #118  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    To Lynx

    I think you would be surprised how little is needed to make a big difference.

    I remember a case about 30 years ago. I was living in Auckland city, and New Zealand had its first case of scurvy in a century. The victim was a 'beer alcoholic' who lived on fish and chips and beer. He came down with scurvy, and was admitted to hospital. What stuck in my mind was the doctor's comment. "If only he had eaten the parsley garnish that came with the fish and chips."

    You do not need a lot of green vegetable to make a big difference to our diet. Nor do I believe that anyone is so badly off that they cannot obtain, or grow enough good stuff to eat a healthy diet, if they choose to. Nor is a doctor required to provide nutrition advice. I could give all the advice anyone could need based on my general reading. So could you, Lynx, and most of the people who contribute to this forum. Even a little bit of research on the internet would do it. Ignorance of the most basic ideas on nutrition is not really an excuse, since that information is so readily available..
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #119  
    who sees through things
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    UK now, US before
    Posts
    269
    Not everyone has an internet connection. If they go to a library or cafe, they have a limited amount of time in which to do research. Not everyone has had access to an education in which they were taught how to interpret advice critically. There is plenty of misinformation on the internet.
    babe likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #120  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Alec

    Not everyone has an IQ above 60, either. But the vast majority do.
    For anyone with sufficient intelligence to tie their own shoelaces, claiming to be unable to learn the basics of nutrition is a lie. After all, most of that basic knowledge boils down to eating some fruit and vegetable as well as their McDonalds.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #121  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,309
    Quote Originally Posted by Alec Bing View Post
    Not everyone has an internet connection. If they go to a library or cafe, they have a limited amount of time in which to do research. Not everyone has had access to an education in which they were taught how to interpret advice critically. There is plenty of misinformation on the internet.
    Most importantly most people don't give a damn, or know people in their communities who give a damn. We in large part enjoy the foods we were raised with and it takes a major life change to interest them beyond that. (For me it was both parents starting to suffer heart attacks well before their parents did). When their unhealthy eating in reinforced with what people around them eat, what's at eye level at the only food places around them, the food is inexpensive, fast to prepare in an otherwise already hectic day--it all makes for a well embedded culture of unhealthy eating. We can bang our heads against a wall trying and waiting a few generations (at best) trying to change an entire culture and business models that cater to unhealthy eating letting tens of millions in the US (and increasingly in other developed nations) suffer from various nutritional problems even we vilify them for being poor and ignorant, or we can actually do something to at least in small part make them healthier and recommend a low-cost low dose multivitamins in the meantime. Doing both is the best and only practical approach.
    Bad Robot and babe like this.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #122  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Lynx

    Recommending vitamin pills because people have a crap diet is not a solution. The solution is good food. And I do not believe that, in an advanced western nation, it is not possible to get good food. Grow it. Buy it. Get it delivered in. There is always a way. It just takes the will.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  23. #123  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,054
    One of my observations is that people who have been eating a crap diet, for whatever reason, seem to have their cognitive processes affected, which should not be surprising. Canada (and I expect the U.S. as well) is awash in snacks and convenience foods, the majority of which are loaded with empty calories. These foods satisfy the taste buds but do not offer any lasting sense of satiation. The people who eat these foods on a regular basis are in a constant cycle of peaks and valleys with their blood sugars which tends to make them volatile, prone to feeling stressed and there seems to be a rather strong correlation between colds and flu and diet from my observations of more than 8 years in the retail grocery business. I have good opportunity to observe what my co-workers eat and their attendance records, a small sample of only 50 people to be sure but some interesting consistencies within this group over the eight years. A few have changed their diet and lifestyle and suddenly are no longer prone to the same cycles of illness.

    In my opinion, there is a time and place for vitamin supplementation for many people, especially those living in Northern climates and without access to a steady diet of fresh foods but I do not believe that vitamins can compensate for a healthy diet and adequate exercise and rest.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  24. #124  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,305
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    Lynx

    Recommending vitamin pills because people have a crap diet is not a solution.
    It is a solution, but it's... argh: I invoke the slippery slope! Lynx, don't you think people on a "crap food + vitamin supplements" diet would become dependent on the supplements? It would be so easy to continue along that path, no?
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  25. #125  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    12,440
    I eat some odd ethnic things from time to time because I find myself CRAVING them......like

    don't hate me

    tripe...grew up eating it and about once a year....I get this mad desire for...tripe...

    Normally I eat mostly chicken, turkey, a bit of bison, a little beef and tons of fruit and some vege's.........
    Reply With Quote  
     

  26. #126  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Another small point.<br>Fruits and vegetables contain more than just vitamins. &nbsp; There is a range of phytochemicals such as flavenoids, and various antioxidants. &nbsp; &nbsp;Nutritionists still do not fully understand all the interactions between these, and other materials with vitamins and minerals. &nbsp; &nbsp;But we do know that vitamins without those extras simply do not work as well.<br><br>Again, I repeat, it is not difficult to have a balanced diet. &nbsp; Only a little fruit and vege daily will do it. &nbsp; &nbsp;I do not believe that vitamins can compensate for lack of these. &nbsp; &nbsp;Nor do I believe that vitamins are particularly healthy &nbsp; The references I posted show shorter lives for tose who take multivitamins.<br><br>If you need a specific vitamin supplement for a specific reason, then OK. &nbsp; But not to take a multivitamin as a replacement for a good diet.
    babe likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  27. #127  
    who sees through things
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    UK now, US before
    Posts
    269
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    To Lynx

    I remember a case about 30 years ago. I was living in Auckland city, and New Zealand had its first case of scurvy in a century. The victim was a 'beer alcoholic' who lived on fish and chips and beer. He came down with scurvy, and was admitted to hospital. What stuck in my mind was the doctor's comment. "If only he had eaten the parsley garnish that came with the fish and chips."
    Just checked costs at a well-known supermarket chain in the UK that is known for its low prices. 100 grams of parsley is £2, a little less than 1/3 of the hourly minimum wage for adults. Store brand white bread is £0.06 per 100 grams, 1/33 the cost. If you were struggling to make ends meet, which would you buy?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  28. #128  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,054
    Quote Originally Posted by Alec Bing View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    To Lynx

    I remember a case about 30 years ago. I was living in Auckland city, and New Zealand had its first case of scurvy in a century. The victim was a 'beer alcoholic' who lived on fish and chips and beer. He came down with scurvy, and was admitted to hospital. What stuck in my mind was the doctor's comment. "If only he had eaten the parsley garnish that came with the fish and chips."
    Just checked costs at a well-known supermarket chain in the UK that is known for its low prices. 100 grams of parsley is £2, a little less than 1/3 of the hourly minimum wage for adults. Store brand white bread is £0.06 per 100 grams, 1/33 the cost. If you were struggling to make ends meet, which would you buy?
    You have identified the fact that for people of limited means, all of these cheap, unhealthy products offer more volume of product. Dried rice and beans offer significantly better options but they take time and energy to prepare and do not so easily fit into many people's schedules, nor would a homeless person be likely to have access to the needed cooking facilities. Fresh herbs in the supermarket in winter are an expensive commodity because of their short shelf life. For those with a roof over their head and a windowsill, parsley IS one of the easiest plants to grow and one only needs a sprig or two now and then.

    Then again, plants require at least a modicum of care and many people would simply forget to tend it.

    Vitamins and multivitamins offer benefits for some situations, IMO, but they are not a long term solution or replacement for a better diet, which should be the long term objective. I remember that for one 8 week period, we were in a remote location and had only white flour pantry items for our diet. We were three children (ages 9-13) working very hard to fetch firewood in thigh deep snow with only hand tools (an axe and a crosscut saw). We soon became easily frustrated and argumentative and tired very easily, a situation which rectified once our diet became more diversified with the harvest of a moose and some new supplies brought in.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  29. #129  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    As scheherazade said, parsley is easy. I have grown it many times, and we have some in our garden now. It grows prolifically with very little care. We have quiter a small vegetable garden, and we are pretty lazy people, so the veges get little care. Yet we have no need to buy green vegetables at all.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  30. #130  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,305
    I think we can discard the window-parsley idea. A whole windowsill of parsley can't produce significant amounts, certainly not through winter where I live. Generally when I eat that, its a full bag from the grocer's, sautéed with butter 'till it collapses to a small dishfull, dispatched at one sitting. All leafy vegetables are like that - impressive volume, low density.

    Through a Vancouver winter the only local greens I get are hand-picked leaves of Western Red Cedar, grown plump by the rains. I don't know what's in it, but it perks me up.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  31. #131  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Pong

    I had not considered anyone would want to cook the stuff. We eat it in small amounts raw.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  32. #132  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,225
    I like to use it as a salad green. I just love tabbouleh. Which also uses a bit of another easily grown pot herb, mint.

    Come to think of it, mint is unsuitable to grow in the garden - it goes everywhere.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  33. #133  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    3
    Just follow a balanced diet, and sleep around 8 hours everyday. If you are deficient on vitamins, there should be some visible symptoms. In that case, consult a dietition.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. taking water from the air
    By elihushaw in forum Chemistry
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: May 21st, 2013, 04:47 PM
  2. Taking some leave from TSF.
    By westwind in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: April 5th, 2013, 01:20 AM
  3. Taking Classes 1 or 2 at a time...
    By gottspieler in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 15th, 2010, 02:43 PM
  4. I'm taking Chemistry soon and...
    By Raymond K in forum Chemistry
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 20th, 2008, 09:13 AM
  5. Taking AI in college
    By Infinitism in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 30th, 2008, 11:54 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •