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Thread: Mama's Hips

  1. #1 Mama's Hips 
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    Reason for the thread: Implants. Story for explanation. in February, 2010, my wife's mother, then 84, finally agreed to an artificial hip implant, after years of pain. I was against it, on principal, as well as concern for her age, but only voiced this to my wife. Surgery went well, everyone thought; several weeks after, however, pain was still too great, careful interpretation of X-rays revealed a hairline crack in the femur, upper leg bone. The hip was opened up, the metal hunk removed, then closed, with leg disconnected from pelvis, for several weeks. A third surgery ensued, insertion of a second implant performed, healing was as expected, and the woman was walking again reasonably soon. The surgeon involved specializes in hip work, has done many hundreds; whether he screwed up or not the first time is unknown.

    a couple of months later, she fell in the living room (she lives alone) and broke the other hip, the "good" one! Yet another surgery, successful the first try, and she is today able to walk, though not great distances, and still drives herself everywhere. She is now 87, takes no medications of any kind. Her blood pressure and cholesterol levels are acceptable.

    My question: I have always heard the body acts to reject foreign objects placed in it, and recall the heart transplant patients as always being carefully medicated and monitored. My mother in law was given no anti-rejection drugs of any kind, at any time during or after her surgical ordeal. How is this possible? jocular


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    I could be wrong here, please correct if so, but I always thought anti-rejection drugs were for biological material only, such as for organ transplants. Things such as artifical hips arn't anything that the immune system can attack as it's not made of cells.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immunosuppressive_drug


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ascended View Post
    I could be wrong here, please correct if so, but I always thought anti-rejection drugs were for biological material only, such as for organ transplants. Things such as artifical hips arn't anything that the immune system can attack as it's not made of cells.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immunosuppressive_drug
    A good point, to be sure. And I could be wrong, but seem to recall that artificial heart valves had rejection ability, as an example. Search & research would likely yield info, whether totally accurate is dubious; thus, I depend on a much more fun source! Here! joc
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    A quick search revealed the body can react to any type of foreign material as an allergic reaction. Now, as I understand it, allergic reactions are carried out by the body's immune system, basically. Or I'm barking up the wrong tree! jocular
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  6. #5  
    ▼▼ dn ʎɐʍ sıɥʇ ▼▼ RedPanda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    My question: I have always heard the body acts to reject foreign objects placed in it, and recall the heart transplant patients as always being carefully medicated and monitored. My mother in law was given no anti-rejection drugs of any kind, at any time during or after her surgical ordeal. How is this possible? jocular
    Titanium is used for implants due to its rare (unique?) combination of properties:

    "It is a lustrous transition metal with a silver color, low density and high strength. It is highly resistant to corrosion in sea water, aqua regia and chlorine."

    "The two most useful properties of the metal are corrosion resistance and the highest strength-to-weight ratio of any metal. In its unalloyed condition, titanium is as strong as some steels, but 45% lighter."

    "Because it is biocompatible (it is non-toxic and is not rejected by the body), titanium is used in a gamut of medical applications including surgical implements and implants, such as hip balls and sockets (joint replacement) that can stay in place for up to 20 years."

    "Titanium has the inherent ability to osseointegrate"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium


    It's biocompatibility is the reason why anti-rejection drugs are not necessary.
    (But the osseointegration is far more interesting. )
    Last edited by RedPanda; July 31st, 2013 at 08:29 AM.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedPanda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    My question: I have always heard the body acts to reject foreign objects placed in it, and recall the heart transplant patients as always being carefully medicated and monitored. My mother in law was given no anti-rejection drugs of any kind, at any time during or after her surgical ordeal. How is this possible? jocular
    Titanium is used for implants due to its rare (unique?) combination of properties:

    "It is a lustrous transition metal with a silver color, low density and high strength. It is highly resistant to corrosion in sea water, aqua regia and chlorine."

    "The two most useful properties of the metal are corrosion resistance and the highest strength-to-weight ratio of any metal. In its unalloyed condition, titanium is as strong as some steels, but 45% lighter."

    "Because it is biocompatible (it is non-toxic and is not rejected by the body), titanium is used in a gamut of medical applications including surgical implements and implants, such as hip balls and sockets (joint replacement) that can stay in place for up to 20 years."

    "Titanium has the inherent ability to osseointegrate"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium


    It's biocompatibility is the reason why anti-rejection drugs are not necessary.
    (But the osseointegration is far more interesting. )
    That's the truth! Thank you for doing my homework for me. It sounds as though not all types of materials containing no living matter are biocompatible. Titanium is good stuff, having an interesting history, first produced in quantity, I believe, in a government built plant in Henderson, Nevada, called Titanium Metals Corp, or TIMET. An old timer who had worked there told me every single electric motor in the place was 3-phase, including itty-bitty motors in desk fans! jocular
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  8. #7  
    ▼▼ dn ʎɐʍ sıɥʇ ▼▼ RedPanda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Titanium is good stuff, having an interesting history, first produced in quantity, I believe, in a government built plant in Henderson, Nevada, called Titanium Metals Corp, or TIMET.
    And just to support my own country:
    "Titanium was discovered included in a mineral in Cornwall, Great Britain, in 1791 by the clergyman and amateur geologist William Gregor, then vicar of Creed parish"
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedPanda View Post
    And just to support my own country:
    "Titanium was discovered included in a mineral in Cornwall, Great Britain, in 1791 by the clergyman and amateur geologist William Gregor, then vicar of Creed parish"
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium
    Neat! And my humble apologies for not noting until this moment that you are not here in my country! Indeed, why would you necessarily be interested my babbling! jocular
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    There's all sorts of non-biological materials that do not activate the immune system — titanium (as noted), steel, gold, nylon, dacron, etc. Yikes! Dacron is a synthetic polyester fabric. One would think that the body would have enough sense to reject polyester. Oh well.

    And there's biological materials that also do not activate the immune system — for example, blood (from living donors), powdered bone (from cadavers), and insulin (from cattle and pigs). For you ladies out there, Premarin is used in hormone replacement therapy. It's obtained from pregnant mare's urine. I wonder how they came up a name like "Premarin"?
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    Cheers Joc, Panda & jrmonroe, you guys have taught me as well. Do we know if there is a reason for why some non-biologicals are rejected and others arn't?
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  12. #11  
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    I have a titanium peg in my jawbone to support a tooth implant. Not unusual, and I am sure lots of other people in this forum have tooth implants also, fixed to titanium pegs in the jaw bone.

    The thing is that titanium actually stimulates bone growth. So when you insert a titanium piece into bone, the bone grows around it, and fixes it tightly in place.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    I have a titanium peg in my jawbone to support a tooth implant. Not unusual, and I am sure lots of other people in this forum have tooth implants also, fixed to titanium pegs in the jaw bone.

    The thing is that titanium actually stimulates bone growth. So when you insert a titanium piece into bone, the bone grows around it, and fixes it tightly in place.
    Most interesting! Is the peg driven into a drilled hole in the bone? As I've seen the hip done, the long metal portion of the implant is actually hammered into the femur. A goose-bump forming thought, for me! jocular
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    Sis had hip implant, so did girlfriend in their 40's.....my 77 year old golfing friend had a new knee, then again she is a doctor, and they had no difficulties.

    She's still dancing!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Reason for the thread: Implants. Story for explanation. in February, 2010, my wife's mother, then 84, finally agreed to an artificial hip implant, after years of pain. I was against it, on principal, as well as concern for her age, but only voiced this to my wife. Surgery went well, everyone thought; several weeks after, however, pain was still too great, careful interpretation of X-rays revealed a hairline crack in the femur, upper leg bone. The hip was opened up, the metal hunk removed, then closed, with leg disconnected from pelvis, for several weeks. A third surgery ensued, insertion of a second implant performed, healing was as expected, and the woman was walking again reasonably soon. The surgeon involved specializes in hip work, has done many hundreds; whether he screwed up or not the first time is unknown.

    a couple of months later, she fell in the living room (she lives alone) and broke the other hip, the "good" one! Yet another surgery, successful the first try, and she is today able to walk, though not great distances, and still drives herself everywhere. She is now 87, takes no medications of any kind. Her blood pressure and cholesterol levels are acceptable.

    My question: I have always heard the body acts to reject foreign objects placed in it, and recall the heart transplant patients as always being carefully medicated and monitored. My mother in law was given no anti-rejection drugs of any kind, at any time during or after her surgical ordeal. How is this possible? jocular
    When I had my Ahmed implants. I know they had me on prednisone eye drops.....and chemo eye injections, but the chemo wasn't for rejections...but more for scar tissue issues.....I think the prednisone was more for rejection issues.
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    They certainly did not affect the attractiveness of your eyes, by the picture! joc
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    To babe

    Prednisone is a steroid used mainly to combat inflammation and to combat auto-immune illness. If you use it in your eyes, my guess it is to stop inflammation.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    They certainly did not affect the attractiveness of your eyes, by the picture! joc
    I believe that was a compliment! Yes they are still very blue.

    Mahalo! *S*
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    To babe

    Prednisone is a steroid used mainly to combat inflammation and to combat auto-immune illness. If you use it in your eyes, my guess it is to stop inflammation.
    I know that. my sister has been on prednisone for 15 years due to an unidentifiable auto-immune illness. My was just to combat, as you said, inflammation and rejection issues.....but the chemotheraphy injected into the eye had to do with scar tissue formation....the bleb...it was not pleasant.
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    What an avatar! Is that smile due to what you have on below the bottom edge? joc
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    What an avatar! Is that smile due to what you have on below the bottom edge? joc
    Methinks thou art wicked, sir.
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  22. #21  
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    What an avatar! Is that smile due to what you have on below the bottom edge? joc
    Methinks thou art wicked, sir.
    Bet on it! joc
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  23. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    What an avatar! Is that smile due to what you have on below the bottom edge? joc
    Methinks thou art wicked, sir.
    Bet on it! joc
    and we are off subject. *S*
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