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Thread: 3% of prescribers write 50%

  1. #1 3% of prescribers write 50% 
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    Prescriber Checkup

    This sit is claiming that just 3% of prescribers wrote 1/2 of all prescriptions.

    Dou you believe this?


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    Well it is a .org site and those tend to have an agenda and bias. Is there any way to verify the data?

    I also noticed there are a crap load of medications that I know are prescribed a lot and they weren't even mentioned in the list. So I am suspicious that some cherry picking is taking place.

    You also have to consider that some people rarely get sick and that there are some people who are existing with a foot in the grave seeing multiple specialists just to keep them alive.

    specialists are more likely to be prescribing multiple medications to a single patient than a general practitioner would. and there are more general practitioners than there are specialists. And there are also loads of pediatricians and the most they usually prescribe are the occasional amoxicillin for childhood ear infections. about anything else a kid gets usually comes from an emergency room visit or a specialist.

    The woman and her grandson that we look after both take in excess of 10 medications a day. and they literally have buckets of pill bottles sitting round the house. Patients like these skew the statistics and so I wouldn't be surprised if the claim was true, but I wouldn't take that to mean there was something nefarious going on.


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    It's was done under freedom of information act for medicare. Why wouldn't it be good data, since it's source is official government database.

    Not sure it's all that alarming that 3% subscribe half of prescriptions. Any doc who specializes in geriatrics is going to be subscribing huge amount compared to those with younger clientele for example; it's not uncommon for an elderly person to be on half a dozen drugs year round, while their grand kid gets a temp one every few years to knock out an ear infection or urinary track infection. The site suggest there is something wrong, but really has little but a few anecdotal in the article.
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    The main issue that sprang out at me from the article is that the whole system seems to be designed both to identify problems and to ensure that there's no avenue to deal with them.
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    A quick look at the stats says that California takes up nearly one tenth of the $77.7B of the national top 500 drug cost. California has the highest population in the USA, is this because it is a sought after retirement retreat ?
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    So that makes California's cost just less than 8 billion for a population of less than 40 million people. Australia's population of about 23 million, 60ish% of California, uses less than 4 billion total for our Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

    So, given that the USA's health system is always much more expensive than any country with a better organised health system, I'd say that California is right in the ballpark.

    If you have issues about the US health system, the problems are much deeper and wider than which state gets which portion of pharmacy benefits.
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    So that makes California's cost just less than 8 billion for a population of less than 40 million people. Australia's population of about 23 million, 60ish% of California, uses less than 4 billion total for our Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

    So, given that the USA's health system is always much more expensive than any country with a better organised health system, I'd say that California is right in the ballpark.

    If you have issues about the US health system, the problems are much deeper and wider than which state gets which portion of pharmacy benefits.
    Too many American's simply live a crap lifestyle. For instance I am not obese, but not thin either. I'm 5'3'' tall and weigh about 160lbs. I have a figure like women from the renaissance paintings. But not being obese doesn't mean I am healthy. I am in terrible shape. I nearly had a heart attack climbing 6 flights of stairs a few months ago. I was literally on my knees when I reached the top and I am only 37. This is just wrong. I have done this to myself by simply not being active enough. I have asked my doctor to help me get into some occupational therapy in order to get myself in good enough shape that I can go to a gym without risking killing myself. But other people would just ask for pills and continue to get fatter and fatter then complain about compressed disks in their spine and get more pills or surgeries for that. It's like the movie Wall-e. We just have life too damned easy and it's killing us. I wish we could have a good solar flare knocking out a good portion of our technology sometimes. See how many people could survive if they actually had to grow food or hunt it for once.

    Scheherazade should start a business where she invites one city dweller to her home to live for a summer and get them in shape simply by making them farm hands having to earn their keep with work. I think they call them dude ranches or something like that. but it shouldn't be just a week long stay. it should be at least a few months or until a certain amount of weight is lost lol.
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    So that makes California's cost just less than 8 billion for a population of less than 40 million people. Australia's population of about 23 million, 60ish% of California, uses less than 4 billion total for our Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

    So, given that the USA's health system is always much more expensive than any country with a better organised health system, I'd say that California is right in the ballpark.

    If you have issues about the US health system, the problems are much deeper and wider than which state gets which portion of pharmacy benefits.
    Too many American's simply live a crap lifestyle. For instance I am not obese, but not thin either. I'm 5'3'' tall and weigh about 160lbs. I have a figure like women from the renaissance paintings. But not being obese doesn't mean I am healthy. I am in terrible shape. I nearly had a heart attack climbing 6 flights of stairs a few months ago. I was literally on my knees when I reached the top and I am only 37. This is just wrong. I have done this to myself by simply not being active enough. I have asked my doctor to help me get into some occupational therapy in order to get myself in good enough shape that I can go to a gym without risking killing myself. But other people would just ask for pills and continue to get fatter and fatter then complain about compressed disks in their spine and get more pills or surgeries for that. It's like the movie Wall-e. We just have life too damned easy and it's killing us. I wish we could have a good solar flare knocking out a good portion of our technology sometimes. See how many people could survive if they actually had to grow food or hunt it for once.

    Scheherazade should start a business where she invites one city dweller to her home to live for a summer and get them in shape simply by making them farm hands having to earn their keep with work. I think they call them dude ranches or something like that. but it shouldn't be just a week long stay. it should be at least a few months or until a certain amount of weight is lost lol.
    You've stated all the personal things wrong, but did not indicate whether adequate steps are being taken to right them.

    "See how many people could survive if they actually had to grow food or hunt it for once." Been there, did that, "off the grid", on 40 acres in Northern Arizona, 1983-84, when the "Reagan Recession" left us with no jobs, no prospects for continuing work of our familiarity, but had the property mentioned, adequately treed with Pinon Pine & Cedar, to provide heat and cooking fuel, a milk goat, and several laying hens. Best year of our lives together! Ask if interested in hearing more about our adventure! jocular
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    So that makes California's cost just less than 8 billion for a population of less than 40 million people. Australia's population of about 23 million, 60ish% of California, uses less than 4 billion total for our Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

    So, given that the USA's health system is always much more expensive than any country with a better organised health system, I'd say that California is right in the ballpark.

    If you have issues about the US health system, the problems are much deeper and wider than which state gets which portion of pharmacy benefits.
    Too many American's simply live a crap lifestyle. For instance I am not obese, but not thin either. I'm 5'3'' tall and weigh about 160lbs. I have a figure like women from the renaissance paintings. But not being obese doesn't mean I am healthy. I am in terrible shape. I nearly had a heart attack climbing 6 flights of stairs a few months ago. I was literally on my knees when I reached the top and I am only 37. This is just wrong. I have done this to myself by simply not being active enough. I have asked my doctor to help me get into some occupational therapy in order to get myself in good enough shape that I can go to a gym without risking killing myself. But other people would just ask for pills and continue to get fatter and fatter then complain about compressed disks in their spine and get more pills or surgeries for that. It's like the movie Wall-e. We just have life too damned easy and it's killing us. I wish we could have a good solar flare knocking out a good portion of our technology sometimes. See how many people could survive if they actually had to grow food or hunt it for once.

    Scheherazade should start a business where she invites one city dweller to her home to live for a summer and get them in shape simply by making them farm hands having to earn their keep with work. I think they call them dude ranches or something like that. but it shouldn't be just a week long stay. it should be at least a few months or until a certain amount of weight is lost lol.
    You've stated all the personal things wrong, but did not indicate whether adequate steps are being taken to right them.
    Actually I did. I asked my doctor for help with occupational therapy. I bolded it above in case you missed it.

    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    "See how many people could survive if they actually had to grow food or hunt it for once." Been there, did that, "off the grid", on 40 acres in Northern Arizona, 1983-84, when the "Reagan Recession" left us with no jobs, no prospects for continuing work of our familiarity, but had the property mentioned, adequately treed with Pinon Pine & Cedar, to provide heat and cooking fuel, a milk goat, and several laying hens. Best year of our lives together! Ask if interested in hearing more about our adventure! jocular
    That sounds great. I lived in Pakistan which is not entirely without any conveniences but compared to what I am used to it was harsh. I was badly out of shape when I got htere but lost 30 lbs in the first 3 months I was there. I got stronger and leaner. Mostly because my day started at 4 am and didn't finish until after 10pm. And I rarely had time to sit. Everything,even basic cooking was a huge undertaking. No instant just add water meals there and any meat you ate was killed just before eating it. Drinking water had to be boiled and filtered before you could drink it. Butter had to be made by actually skimming cream and churning it. Yogurt, which was a main staple there had to be made daily. Fresh milk had to be boiled and skimmed daily. Laundry was mostly hand washed, and I had to wash daily for a family of 10. There was no driving to walmart. Most travel was by foot. And I had to worry about AntiAmerican sentiment so had to constantly watch over my shoulder and be prepared to kill anyone that would grab me.

    And I still wanted to move to a village where I could grow my own food so that I wouldn't have to interact with the people as much as I did to buy vegetables every day.
    Last edited by seagypsy; July 22nd, 2013 at 10:57 AM. Reason: liveD not live
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    That sounds great. I live in Pakistan
    I just saw this and am putting a correction out since I may forget to remind S.G. of this typo later:
    Lived* in Pakistan- SeaGypsy does not currently live in Pakistan.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    That sounds great. I live in Pakistan
    I just saw this and am putting a correction out since I may forget to remind S.G. of this typo later:
    Lived* in Pakistan- SeaGypsy does not currently live in Pakistan.
    dammit sleepy posting strikes again, will proceed to edit.
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    Obviously, sg, you did not remain in Pakistan, nor describe the length of your stay, or the reason for being there in the first place, neither of the last two facts being any of my business certainly. But, you lost weight there, gained vitality in a way, out of necessity likely, both facts similar to results of my own "wilderness" experience. In our case, my former employer found that the automated equipment I had designed and installed was confounding their efforts (ha, designed-in job security?), and they offered my job back, and I took the bait. (FWIW, I stayed only 6 months, then left of my own accord, totally disgusted, and they were again confounded, first saying I couldn't just leave, then saying I know not what, 'cause I had walked out the door). That little move of self-centered obstinacy on my part caused profound distress for my wife and I, for awhile. Hard-headed bastard that I am, I refused to submit to the level of "suck-up-edness" needed to remain on the job. It all turned out OK, as you may learn if you read my thread about "Retired, living in poverty", or whatever I called it... jocular
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    But, you lost weight there, gained vitality in a way, out of necessity likely, both facts similar to results of my own "wilderness" experience.
    Exactly! That's my point. Life is so easy for most Americans, even the ones that are really struggling by comparison to underdeveloped countries, that we are complacent and lazy. We don't exercise unless we have to. We eat preprocessed junk that carries little nutrition and mostly sugar, simply because its fast and easy. If life were just a little less easy, I think our entire population would be a little bit healthier.

    For now, occupational therapy just to get myself in good enough shape to exercise without supervision, where I won't inadvertently kill myself, along with someone to act as a lifestyle coach to keep me motivated and help break long standing bad habits is the best thing. I have talked to 2 of my three doctors and they are both in agreement and want to meet with the third to come up with some plan of action. Unfortunately I think they must communicate by smoke signal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    But, you lost weight there, gained vitality in a way, out of necessity likely, both facts similar to results of my own "wilderness" experience.
    Exactly! That's my point. Life is so easy for most Americans, even the ones that are really struggling by comparison to underdeveloped countries, that we are complacent and lazy. We don't exercise unless we have to. We eat preprocessed junk that carries little nutrition and mostly sugar, simply because its fast and easy. If life were just a little less easy, I think our entire population would be a little bit healthier.
    And a whole lot thinner! jocular
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    Despite modern living being too easy and leading to too many people becoming obese, we are still healthier and live longer than any other society. If you think Pakistan is so great, look up its average life span and its health problems! 66 years versus 79 for the obese USA.
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    Despite modern living being too easy and leading to too many people becoming obese, we are still healthier and live longer than any other society. If you think Pakistan is so great, look up its average life span and its health problems! 66 years versus 79 for the obese USA.
    True but who wants to live beyond 66? I intend to have a going away party on my 65th birthday, and that will be the last anyone sees or hears from me. No gifts for me will be allowed. I will be the one giving out gifts, all my worldly possessions to whoever I wish to have them.

    btw, I didn't say Pakistan was great. Pakistan sucks. But having to work to survive is what is great.
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    True but who wants to live beyond 66?
    Me, for starters. I'm already 66. My mother is 88 and still pretty healthy. My 30+ year old daughter gets married later this year.

    I'd like to see grandchildren - and for them to grow up a bit before I kick the bucket.

    Anyway, I have to do the "right" thing according to family standards. Anyone who drops off the perch before they're 85, on both sides of my family, has just not tried. (I presume my reputation will not be sullied if I die from being run over by a bus or abseiling down a cliff. Otherwise, longevity is a family tradition that's pretty close to an obligation.)
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    True but who wants to live beyond 66?
    Me, for starters. I'm already 66. My mother is 88 and still pretty healthy. My 30+ year old daughter gets married later this year.

    I'd like to see grandchildren - and for them to grow up a bit before I kick the bucket.

    Anyway, I have to do the "right" thing according to family standards. Anyone who drops off the perch before they're 85, on both sides of my family, has just not tried. (I presume my reputation will not be sullied if I die from being run over by a bus or abseiling down a cliff. Otherwise, longevity is a family tradition that's pretty close to an obligation.)
    No one in my family still has their sanity or their looks past 60. I'm vain. And my sanity is already half gone. To remove myself at 65 would be a public service. I imagine you have contributed much more to society and have a lot more to give still than I do. I passed my expiration date 6 years ago.
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    It is very common for people to claim they do not want to live too long, past when they are no longer fit, or when they become a burden. Then those people get old, and suddenly they realise they simply do not want to die, no matter what age they are.
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    It is very common for people to claim they do not want to live too long, past when they are no longer fit, or when they become a burden. Then those people get old, and suddenly they realise they simply do not want to die, no matter what age they are.
    I have faced death many times, even somewhat experienced death. it really isnt that bad. To me, the concept of mental death is when you no longer perceive yourself to exist. When you lose self awareness. I experienced that. And it didn't scare me until my brain rebooted. If it hadn't it would have been no big deal. I was shopping in the meat aisle at the grocery store and then suddenly didn't exist. I didn't even know it happened until i woke up in the back of an ambulance. It was actually kinda cool. My daughter freaked out, but only because she wasn't ready for it. By the time I'm 65 she will be ready.

    I really don't get the fear of dying thing. I fear living in excruciating pain or in a mangled form of my former self.
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    It is very common for people to claim they do not want to live too long, past when they are no longer fit, or when they become a burden. Then those people get old, and suddenly they realise they simply do not want to die, no matter what age they are.
    I knew a man at bien hoa who claimed that he didn't want to live as a cripple, but when the mortar attack tore off the bottoms of his legs while he was refueling a bomber, he did an 80 yard dash to the bunker on the stubs in under 8 seconds calling for tournicates as he dove into the bunker.
    His name ain't on the wall.
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    But, you lost weight there, gained vitality in a way, out of necessity likely, both facts similar to results of my own "wilderness" experience.
    Exactly! That's my point. Life is so easy for most Americans, even the ones that are really struggling by comparison to underdeveloped countries, that we are complacent and lazy. We don't exercise unless we have to. We eat preprocessed junk that carries little nutrition and mostly sugar, simply because its fast and easy. If life were just a little less easy, I think our entire population would be a little bit healthier.

    For now, occupational therapy just to get myself in good enough shape to exercise without supervision, where I won't inadvertently kill myself, along with someone to act as a lifestyle coach to keep me motivated and help break long standing bad habits is the best thing. I have talked to 2 of my three doctors and they are both in agreement and want to meet with the third to come up with some plan of action. Unfortunately I think they must communicate by smoke signal.
    America, ( along with other countries ) produces many fine athletes, it is just a life style choice, even in America.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    .....His name ain't on the wall.
    Mine ain't either, but they sure tried hard to get me over there just after I turned 26! A quirk of fate spared me from 'Nam, and while I should be thankful to the man, murder-suicide is a nasty business.

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    It is very common for people to claim they do not want to live too long, past when they are no longer fit, or when they become a burden. Then those people get old, and suddenly they realise they simply do not want to die, no matter what age they are.
    That's one issue. The other issue is not being able to envisage yourself in different circumstances. Lots of people say they'd like to add things to their "end of life" directions apart from if I'm in a vegetative state then please pull the plug. They say they'd Hate! it if they were disabled in some way, or in one particular way, and would rather be dead than live "like that". We are all much more adaptable than we think we are. Most people who are disabled, or limited in some way, still have pleasures and satisfaction in their lives. Some of them find whole new groups of friends or hobbies or interests because of their new limitations.

    Living your life as though 25-45 years old is the ideal and everything after that is just loss and grief is the best possible way to ensure that your older years will be just loss and grief. My now 88 year old mother still has regrets and some sorrow about how her parents let their lives become a series of lost activities without once taking on something new - and her father lived to 93. They'd stopped going out to dances and the like in their 60s. So he'd lived another 3 decades with a big hole in his life and his self-image - he was still quite vigorous going for long walks - but on his own. He could've taken up golf or any of dozens of other activities that friends and neighbours often invited him to, but he wouldn't. She's made sure that she still goes out to theatres and her various clubs as well as exercise classes - it's really important once you're past 70ish, earlier if you have a physical problem, to do certain exercises to maintain core muscle strength.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    It is very common for people to claim they do not want to live too long, past when they are no longer fit, or when they become a burden. Then those people get old, and suddenly they realise they simply do not want to die, no matter what age they are.
    That's one issue. The other issue is not being able to envisage yourself in different circumstances. Lots of people say they'd like to add things to their "end of life" directions apart from if I'm in a vegetative state then please pull the plug. They say they'd Hate! it if they were disabled in some way, or in one particular way, and would rather be dead than live "like that". We are all much more adaptable than we think we are. Most people who are disabled, or limited in some way, still have pleasures and satisfaction in their lives. Some of them find whole new groups of friends or hobbies or interests because of their new limitations.

    Living your life as though 25-45 years old is the ideal and everything after that is just loss and grief is the best possible way to ensure that your older years will be just loss and grief. My now 88 year old mother still has regrets and some sorrow about how her parents let their lives become a series of lost activities without once taking on something new - and her father lived to 93. They'd stopped going out to dances and the like in their 60s. So he'd lived another 3 decades with a big hole in his life and his self-image - he was still quite vigorous going for long walks - but on his own. He could've taken up golf or any of dozens of other activities that friends and neighbours often invited him to, but he wouldn't. She's made sure that she still goes out to theatres and her various clubs as well as exercise classes - it's really important once you're past 70ish, earlier if you have a physical problem, to do certain exercises to maintain core muscle strength.
    Well I've been antisocial all my life. I'll likely just be here on this forum pissin people off like I am doing now.
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    What would you think if the medical profession makes a break through with anti-aging drugs that not only allow you to look much younger but also repairs worn out veins and other body parts that need "updating" as it were? But this was found after you turned 66 by a few months and therefor you never would have known about the break through.

    Or if you were dying of some incurable disease but again after a few months after when you died the new medication was discovered that cured the disease. I really do not think I'd have a "date" of my death already in mind and try to live as long as I could as long I wasn't suffering to much.
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
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  29. #28  
    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    What would you think if the medical profession makes a break through with anti-aging drugs that not only allow you to look much younger but also repairs worn out veins and other body parts that need "updating" as it were? But this was found after you turned 66 by a few months and therefor you never would have known about the break through.

    Or if you were dying of some incurable disease but again after a few months after when you died the new medication was discovered that cured the disease. I really do not think I'd have a "date" of my death already in mind and try to live as long as I could as long I wasn't suffering to much.

    I wouldn't think anything. I'd be dead.

    I don't think anything less of you for wanting to live. That is normal. but for some reason I always find myself having to defend my desire to not live beyond a particular stage in life. Does it scare people when they hear someone express a lack of fear of death? I'm curious why anyone would feel the need to convince me that I should live longer than I have decided I want to. I may change my mind at some point. I may want to end it sooner. I may want to stick around if circumstances change. But as things stand right now my 65th birthday will be a going away party. I don't really see what the big deal about that is.

    I believe people should have the right to die with dignity and on their own terms. I wish to live life up to a certain point and so long as things have gone well enough up to that point, I want to face death squarely with all my senses about me and with a smile on my face. Death has been a shadow to me my entire adult life and quite frankly Id like to be able to give him a firm handshake when we finally say our formal hellos.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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  30. #29  
    who sees through things
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    [QUOTE=sculptor;442797]
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post

    I knew a man at bien hoa who claimed that he didn't want to live as a cripple, but when the mortar attack tore off the bottoms of his legs while he was refueling a bomber, he did an 80 yard dash to the bunker on the stubs in under 8 seconds calling for tournicates as he dove into the bunker.
    His name ain't on the wall.
    If you are young and otherwise in good shape, losing two legs should not turn you into a helpless "cripple".
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