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Thread: Staying up late is equal to slow-motion suicide?

  1. #1 Staying up late is equal to slow-motion suicide? 
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    Staying up late is equal to slow-motion suicide?
    I often stay up late,When I saw the news , I was shocked
    :BH


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    The media is full of scaremongering stories. Everything is bad for you. And I mean everything. According to the media.


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    Then as a "theater whore" I am gonna die.

    I go to bed at 2:30 and get up at 10:30......
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    Staying up late isn't wrong as long as you don't turn it into a habit. When that happens, you start to sleep longer into the day to compensate.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    If it is true as a chronic insomniac I'm screwed
    Given the overwhelming amount of evidence posted in the OP....yeah, you're screwed.
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    I work graveyard shift half the week and abide by the standard day schedule the rest of the week, a routine that I have maintained for 4 years, working straight graveyards for 4 years before that. My vitals are amazingly good given my vintage, lol, although past and present indicators are no guarantee of future performance, at least in the stock market.

    This schedule has been the demise of any social life I may have contemplated, however, leaving me with few options save to bring down the price of virtual reality by hanging out on science forums.
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    Quote Originally Posted by luna247 View Post
    Staying up late is equal to slow-motion suicide?
    I often stay up late,When I saw the news , I was shocked
    :BH
    So how do you explain, the large amount of hospital workers, fireman, police etc ,whom stay up late on shift work, not falling down dead at the drop of a night shift ?
    .
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wilson View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by luna247 View Post
    Staying up late is equal to slow-motion suicide?
    I often stay up late,When I saw the news , I was shocked
    :BH
    So how do you explain, the large amount of hospital workers, fireman, police etc ,whom stay up late on shift work, not falling down dead at the drop of a night shift ?
    Actually, if you google it, there are quite a number of studies that have identified a correlation between shift work and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, as well as stomach problems and ulcers, depression, and an increased risk of accidents or injury. There are many factors involved, including poor attention to diet, sleep deprivation and the interruptions to our circadian rhythms interfere with the healing cycles which occur during night sleep.

    From experience I have observed that I can get a copious amount of sleep during day time hours but it does not afford me the same benefits as getting adequate sleep between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. My schedule seldom allows me to hit that complete window but on the days of the week that I am not on graveyards, I try to get to sleep by midnight.

    Shift Work Health Risks: Heart Disease, Ulcers, Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, Accidents

    I started this process and for the present remain so but I am more disciplined than most when it comes to nutrition, exercise and sleep. Additionally, I have been researching this topic continually for new information and I monitor myself and my co-workers for any changes in mood and conduct.

    It is a dangerous game but in a competitive world, it is not without it's compensations. The pay is usual higher and many shift jobs offer greater autonomy, aspects which appeal to many, including myself.
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    There may be correlation but are the late shifts causation of the condition? Or are they effects of not targeting that demographic with good information on how to stay healthy on an altered schedule?
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    Night-shift workers are more likely to watch daytime TV.
    Imagine the harm that must be doing to them...

    Personally, my body prefers me sleeping between 09:00 and 13:00.
    If I go to sleep at 09:00, I will wake up refreshed at 13:00 (without needing an alarm clock).
    Unfortunately, I have only ever had one job that had allowed me to sleep those hours.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    There may be correlation but are the late shifts causation of the condition? Or are they effects of not targeting that demographic with good information on how to stay healthy on an altered schedule?
    I have taken it upon myself to find and post information on how to stay healthy on shift work as part of my duties when I was a shop steward. Not all people will follow the advice and I have also observed a correlation between people with B blood type finding the shift interferes with their health. Three such persons experienced an increase in blood pressure which returned to normal when they left the job. One young lady came back just for a month before heading back east and within two weeks she once again began to experience high blood pressure and poor sleep.

    Interestingly, she had spent three months working two jobs, 13+ hour days for six days a week to raise money for her future plans yet had no such symptoms during that interval. She was a close friend for 18 months and so I had precise information on her diet, rest and other habits which makes that correlation of particular interest. During her last month, she stayed in my guest house and worked the same shift as myself, maintaining the same hours.

    I continue to monitor myself and all who I work graveyard shift with because it is both interesting and relevant.
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    Staying up late to the Health Dangers - Staying up late is sometimes exciting for some people. But know that the frequency of activity turns staying up very harmful to health. The health dangers of staying up for discussion here is about staying up all activities that can lead to Heart Disease and Stroke.

    As expressed by the experts who have warned of heart disease, the trend of burning the candle at the end of the day before bed causes a "time bomb" of health problems. In that sense, staying still a bad influence.

    Demands of work and family barely stop from before dawn until midnight. If you are not proficient set bedtime, the result can lead to heart disease and stroke. Similarly, as found by scientists at Warwick University.

    They found that sleeping less than six hours a night increases the risk of death from heart disease approximately nearly 50 percent, and increase the risk of death from stroke by 15 percent. Conclusions obtained after the researchers looked at 470,000 people from eight countries over 25 years .Staying up for health hazards - News - Bubblews
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew McMahon View Post
    Staying up late isn't wrong as long as you don't turn it into a habit. When that happens, you start to sleep longer into the day to compensate.
    It is my clock! If I went to bed (I tried) at 11:00 p.m., I will wake up by 3:00 a.m. and that is the end of my sleep. I will then drag my slender white derriere around and not be functional or productive. If I go to bed at 2-2:30 and wake up at 10:30 (sometimes 11:00 tops) I will have a full day of work till I go to bed on my own clock.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    I work graveyard shift half the week and abide by the standard day schedule the rest of the week, a routine that I have maintained for 4 years, working straight graveyards for 4 years before that. My vitals are amazingly good given my vintage, lol, although past and present indicators are no guarantee of future performance, at least in the stock market.

    This schedule has been the demise of any social life I may have contemplated, however, leaving me with few options save to bring down the price of virtual reality by hanging out on science forums.
    And being a nice person, and always interesting.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wilson View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by luna247 View Post
    Staying up late is equal to slow-motion suicide?
    I often stay up late,When I saw the news , I was shocked
    :BH
    So how do you explain, the large amount of hospital workers, fireman, police etc ,whom stay up late on shift work, not falling down dead at the drop of a night shift ?
    Actually, if you google it, there are quite a number of studies that have identified a correlation between shift work and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, as well as stomach problems and ulcers, depression, and an increased risk of accidents or injury. There are many factors involved, including poor attention to diet, sleep deprivation and the interruptions to our circadian rhythms interfere with the healing cycles which occur during night sleep.

    From experience I have observed that I can get a copious amount of sleep during day time hours but it does not afford me the same benefits as getting adequate sleep between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. My schedule seldom allows me to hit that complete window but on the days of the week that I am not on graveyards, I try to get to sleep by midnight.

    Shift Work Health Risks: Heart Disease, Ulcers, Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, Accidents

    I started this process and for the present remain so but I am more disciplined than most when it comes to nutrition, exercise and sleep. Additionally, I have been researching this topic continually for new information and I monitor myself and my co-workers for any changes in mood and conduct.

    It is a dangerous game but in a competitive world, it is not without it's compensations. The pay is usual higher and many shift jobs offer greater autonomy, aspects which appeal to many, including myself.
    My father worked graveyard shift for 33 years. He did fine.....till he retired and went to a regular sleep schedule. Any thoughts? Just curious.
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  18. #17  
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    Staying up late is not the same as sleeping less than six hours a night. Some people have circadian clocks that make them fall asleep late and wake up late. If they could find jobs that allowed them to follow their natural rhythms, they would not have problems. It's not a health problem, it's a societal problem.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alec Bing View Post
    Staying up late is not the same as sleeping less than six hours a night. Some people have circadian clocks that make them fall asleep late and wake up late. If they could find jobs that allowed them to follow their natural rhythms, they would not have problems. It's not a health problem, it's a societal problem.
    IT is my clock. *S*...I don't know that it is "scientific" but I do believe people have their own clocks. My husband wakes up within 15 minutes of a certain time every morning..............I wake up between a certain 30 minutes of every day. I get the same amount of sleep, but different hours.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    IT is my clock. *S*...I don't know that it is "scientific" but I do believe people have their own clocks. My husband wakes up within 15 minutes of a certain time every morning..............I wake up between a certain 30 minutes of every day. I get the same amount of sleep, but different hours.
    It is scientific. The circadian clock is regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Everyone has their own clock.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alec Bing View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    IT is my clock. *S*...I don't know that it is "scientific" but I do believe people have their own clocks. My husband wakes up within 15 minutes of a certain time every morning..............I wake up between a certain 30 minutes of every day. I get the same amount of sleep, but different hours.
    It is scientific. The circadian clock is regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Everyone has their own clock.
    * laughing*...I understood what you said, but dang you use big words! *L*...Yes....we all have our own "clocks". I utterly agree. I cannot explain mine. It is not learned as I had to switch "Clocks" when my babies were little..but as they grew up my clock came right back. I changed my clock for my children out of sheer will.....but yes my clock runs 2:30 a.m to 10:30 a.m. My return button does not work in here...so sorry for the run on sentences. Mahalo!
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    My father worked graveyard shift for 33 years. He did fine.....till he retired and went to a regular sleep schedule. Any thoughts? Just curious.
    That is very interesting, babe. Would you know your father's blood type? In our present workplace, the Type O blood types are the ones with the longest tenure of graveyard shift. All are also considerably past 40 years of age, one of the benchmarks of note in some of the research I have read, that claims it gets harder to do this shift beyond forty. Given that two of the gentlemen I work with are only a couple of years from retirement, there are obviously some whose genetics predispose them to be tough.

    Your comment suggests that you lost your father sometime after his retirement. My condolences for your loss. Are you able to share any more details subsequent to your father's retirement?

    Thirty-three years is a lengthy working career, doubly so for shift work. I would surmise that he had good genetics for such endurance. Was he structured in his diet and sleep schedule at all?
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  23. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wilson View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by luna247 View Post
    Staying up late is equal to slow-motion suicide?I often stay up late,When I saw the news , I was shocked:BH
    So how do you explain, the large amount of hospital workers, fireman, police etc ,whom stay up late on shift work, not falling down dead at the drop of a night shift ?
    Actually, if you google it, there are quite a number of studies that have identified a correlation between shift work and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, as well as stomach problems and ulcers, depression, and an increased risk of accidents or injury. There are many factors involved, including poor attention to diet, sleep deprivation and the interruptions to our circadian rhythms interfere with the healing cycles which occur during night sleep.From experience I have observed that I can get a copious amount of sleep during day time hours but it does not afford me the same benefits as getting adequate sleep between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. My schedule seldom allows me to hit that complete window but on the days of the week that I am not on graveyards, I try to get to sleep by midnight.Shift Work Health Risks: Heart Disease, Ulcers, Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, AccidentsI started this process and for the present remain so but I am more disciplined than most when it comes to nutrition, exercise and sleep. Additionally, I have been researching this topic continually for new information and I monitor myself and my co-workers for any changes in mood and conduct.It is a dangerous game but in a competitive world, it is not without it's compensations. The pay is usual higher and many shift jobs offer greater autonomy, aspects which appeal to many, including myself.
    Ok, you have done your research, but do more shift workers die at work than day workers?
    .
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  24. #23  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    My father worked graveyard shift for 33 years. He did fine.....till he retired and went to a regular sleep schedule. Any thoughts? Just curious.
    That is very interesting, babe. Would you know your father's blood type? In our present workplace, the Type O blood types are the ones with the longest tenure of graveyard shift. All are also considerably past 40 years of age, one of the benchmarks of note in some of the research I have read, that claims it gets harder to do this shift beyond forty. Given that two of the gentlemen I work with are only a couple of years from retirement, there are obviously some whose genetics predispose them to be tough.
    Your comment suggests that you lost your father sometime after his retirement. My condolences for your loss. Are you able to share any more details subsequent to your father's retirement?

    Thirty-three years is a lengthy working career, doubly so for shift work. I would surmise that he had good genetics for such endurance. Was he structured in his diet and sleep schedule at all?
    I believe he was B Positive, but don't write that down as a fact. I don't know any O types in the family. He did the shifts all his life. Sorry my paragraph in this discussion does not work. I lost my father at the age of 79. He had a heart attack at the age of 53. His first. Please also note, that my father was involved in nuclear testing in the Bay of Pigs era...on Christmas Island in the South Pacific. He spent six months and I actually have the slides he took of the nuclear blasts, so he was obviously exposed to nuclear fallout. Subsequent to his retirement? Well, he worked, and fixed things, was a woodworker, fished a bit. I would not say he was a fitness guru but not fat. Being European, we ate mostly organically and healthy, and fresh food. So his diet was healthy, he worked laboring at the house, but not in a gym. He had normal sleep patterns...he'd get home, make himself breakfast, and go to sleep and get up about 8:30...usually arrived around 12:30 or one.....our dinner in summer, was at 1:00 p.m. and a light meal at 5 consisting of soup or salad. Is there something specific you wish to ask me? If so feel free. I am an open book and have always been. I don't mind. *S*
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    In our present workplace, the Type O blood types are the ones with the longest tenure of graveyard shift.
    Why does your workplace keep records of blood type and use it for statistical purposes? Is that information statistically significant? What is the prevalence of Type O in the workplace overall and in the overall population?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alec Bing View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    In our present workplace, the Type O blood types are the ones with the longest tenure of graveyard shift.
    Why does your workplace keep records of blood type and use it for statistical purposes? Is that information statistically significant? What is the prevalence of Type O in the workplace overall and in the overall population?
    My workplace does not keep such information. These are details that have arisen from my observations and personal sharing with co-workers, of which I have seen close to two hundred people revolve through two venues in 8 years. I happen to find it interesting that the three people who have lasted the longest, 8, 10 and 12 years respectively, are the most senior members and all of us type O, that's all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    My father worked graveyard shift for 33 years. He did fine.....till he retired and went to a regular sleep schedule. Any thoughts? Just curious.
    That is very interesting, babe. Would you know your father's blood type? In our present workplace, the Type O blood types are the ones with the longest tenure of graveyard shift. All are also considerably past 40 years of age, one of the benchmarks of note in some of the research I have read, that claims it gets harder to do this shift beyond forty. Given that two of the gentlemen I work with are only a couple of years from retirement, there are obviously some whose genetics predispose them to be tough.
    Your comment suggests that you lost your father sometime after his retirement. My condolences for your loss. Are you able to share any more details subsequent to your father's retirement?

    Thirty-three years is a lengthy working career, doubly so for shift work. I would surmise that he had good genetics for such endurance. Was he structured in his diet and sleep schedule at all?
    I believe he was B Positive, but don't write that down as a fact. I don't know any O types in the family. He did the shifts all his life. Sorry my paragraph in this discussion does not work. I lost my father at the age of 79. He had a heart attack at the age of 53. His first. Please also note, that my father was involved in nuclear testing in the Bay of Pigs era...on Christmas Island in the South Pacific. He spent six months and I actually have the slides he took of the nuclear blasts, so he was obviously exposed to nuclear fallout. Subsequent to his retirement? Well, he worked, and fixed things, was a woodworker, fished a bit. I would not say he was a fitness guru but not fat. Being European, we ate mostly organically and healthy, and fresh food. So his diet was healthy, he worked laboring at the house, but not in a gym. He had normal sleep patterns...he'd get home, make himself breakfast, and go to sleep and get up about 8:30...usually arrived around 12:30 or one.....our dinner in summer, was at 1:00 p.m. and a light meal at 5 consisting of soup or salad. Is there something specific you wish to ask me? If so feel free. I am an open book and have always been. I don't mind. *S*
    Interesting details, Babe, and I thank you for sharing. A structured schedule and a healthy diet are the two most important details for enduring shift work so I would credit your father's lifestyle with contributing to his success in working nights. Sorry to dash off but I am just home from work and have to attend to moving a horse shortly by truck and trailer so a number of details to attend. I'm sure that I may have more questions later.
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wilson View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wilson View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by luna247 View Post
    Staying up late is equal to slow-motion suicide?I often stay up late,When I saw the news , I was shocked:BH
    So how do you explain, the large amount of hospital workers, fireman, police etc ,whom stay up late on shift work, not falling down dead at the drop of a night shift ?
    Actually, if you google it, there are quite a number of studies that have identified a correlation between shift work and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, as well as stomach problems and ulcers, depression, and an increased risk of accidents or injury. There are many factors involved, including poor attention to diet, sleep deprivation and the interruptions to our circadian rhythms interfere with the healing cycles which occur during night sleep.From experience I have observed that I can get a copious amount of sleep during day time hours but it does not afford me the same benefits as getting adequate sleep between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. My schedule seldom allows me to hit that complete window but on the days of the week that I am not on graveyards, I try to get to sleep by midnight.Shift Work Health Risks: Heart Disease, Ulcers, Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, AccidentsI started this process and for the present remain so but I am more disciplined than most when it comes to nutrition, exercise and sleep. Additionally, I have been researching this topic continually for new information and I monitor myself and my co-workers for any changes in mood and conduct.It is a dangerous game but in a competitive world, it is not without it's compensations. The pay is usual higher and many shift jobs offer greater autonomy, aspects which appeal to many, including myself.
    Ok, you have done your research, but do more shift workers die at work than day workers?
    When we consider all of the jobs that involve night shift work, many of them quite dangerous, it would be very interesting to compare the stats. The danger does not end when you leave the workplace. Fatigue can kill you while driving home which would mess up the statistics if your parameters are simply dying at work.

    Not only are night-shift workers prone to serious driving accidents after their shifts end, but major industrial accidents, such as the Three Mile Island and the Exxon Valdez oil spill, have been caused, in part, by mistakes made by excessively sleepy workers on a night or extended shift. (NHLBI, 2005) In addition, night shift workers are often employed in the most dangerous jobs, such as firefighting, emergency medical services, law enforcement and security, or in professions, such as nursing, medical practice, and commercial driving, which require them to perform at their best so as not to endanger others.
    The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) determined that drowsy driving was probably the cause of more than half of crashes leading to a truck driverís death. (NTSB, 1990a,b) For each truck driver fatality, another three to four people are killed. (NHTSA, 1994) Shift work also makes workers more prone to workplace accidents, with studies showing a boosted rate of accidents linked to the use of sharp instruments and items by medical personnel, as well as medication and diagnostic errors and increased patient death. (Ayas, et al 2006; Lockley, et al, 2006; Barger, et al, 2006.) In industrial settings, the risk of both accidents and injuries increases by more than 30 percent on night shifts, rises over successive night shifts, and increases exponentially with successive hours on a shift. (Folkard, et al, 2003)
    How Atypical Work Schedules Affect Performance | National Sleep Foundation - Information on Sleep Health and Safety

    The article above is worth the read for those interested in details. There is a long list of sources attached.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    My father worked graveyard shift for 33 years. He did fine.....till he retired and went to a regular sleep schedule. Any thoughts? Just curious.
    That is very interesting, babe. Would you know your father's blood type? In our present workplace, the Type O blood types are the ones with the longest tenure of graveyard shift. All are also considerably past 40 years of age, one of the benchmarks of note in some of the research I have read, that claims it gets harder to do this shift beyond forty. Given that two of the gentlemen I work with are only a couple of years from retirement, there are obviously some whose genetics predispose them to be tough.
    Your comment suggests that you lost your father sometime after his retirement. My condolences for your loss. Are you able to share any more details subsequent to your father's retirement?

    Thirty-three years is a lengthy working career, doubly so for shift work. I would surmise that he had good genetics for such endurance. Was he structured in his diet and sleep schedule at all?
    I believe he was B Positive, but don't write that down as a fact. I don't know any O types in the family. He did the shifts all his life. Sorry my paragraph in this discussion does not work. I lost my father at the age of 79. He had a heart attack at the age of 53. His first. Please also note, that my father was involved in nuclear testing in the Bay of Pigs era...on Christmas Island in the South Pacific. He spent six months and I actually have the slides he took of the nuclear blasts, so he was obviously exposed to nuclear fallout. Subsequent to his retirement? Well, he worked, and fixed things, was a woodworker, fished a bit. I would not say he was a fitness guru but not fat. Being European, we ate mostly organically and healthy, and fresh food. So his diet was healthy, he worked laboring at the house, but not in a gym. He had normal sleep patterns...he'd get home, make himself breakfast, and go to sleep and get up about 8:30...usually arrived around 12:30 or one.....our dinner in summer, was at 1:00 p.m. and a light meal at 5 consisting of soup or salad. Is there something specific you wish to ask me? If so feel free. I am an open book and have always been. I don't mind. *S*
    Interesting details, Babe, and I thank you for sharing. A structured schedule and a healthy diet are the two most important details for enduring shift work so I would credit your father's lifestyle with contributing to his success in working nights. Sorry to dash off but I am just home from work and have to attend to moving a horse shortly by truck and trailer so a number of details to attend. I'm sure that I may have more questions later.
    No worries!! Anytime!
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