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Thread: Antisocial Behaviour (homicides?) induced by a toxic substance?

  1. #1 Antisocial Behaviour (homicides?) induced by a toxic substance? 
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    I'm wondering if some ASPDs can be caused by chronic toxication:

    Lead is a toxic metal that accumulates and has subtle and insidious neurotoxic effects especially at low exposure levels, such as low IQ and antisocial behavior. It has particularly harmful effects on children. These concerns eventually led to the ban on TEL in automobile gasoline in many countries. Some neurologists have speculated that the lead phaseout may have caused average IQ levels to rise by several points in the US (by reducing cumulative brain damage throughout the population, especially in the young). For the entire US population, during and after the TEL phaseout, the mean blood lead level dropped from 16 μg/dL in 1976 to only 3 μg/dL in 1991.[19] The US Centers for Disease Control considered blood lead levels "elevated" when they were above 10 μg/dL. Lead exposure affects the intelligence quotient (IQ) such that a blood lead level of 30 μg/dL is associated with a 6.9-point reduction of IQ, with most reduction (3.9 points) occurring below 10 μg/dL.[20]
    A statistically significant correlation has been found between the usage rate of leaded gasoline and violent crime: taking into account a 22-year time lag, the violent crime curve virtually tracks the lead exposure curve.[19][21] After the ban on TEL, blood lead levels in US children dramatically decreased.[19]
    Although leaded gasoline is largely gone in North America, it has left high concentrations of lead in the soil adjacent to roads that were constructed prior to its phaseout. Children are particularly at risk if they consume this.[citation needed]


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    Quote Originally Posted by bezoar View Post
    I'm wondering if some ASPDs can be caused by chronic toxication:
    All of your links lead directly to the science forum homepage...
    Quote Originally Posted by bezoar View Post
    Although leaded gasoline is largely gone in North America, it has left high concentrations of lead in the soil adjacent to roads that were constructed prior to its phaseout. Children are particularly at risk if they consume this.
    Can't say I've seen many kids sitting on the sides of old roads chowing down on old asphalt and gobbling up tainted soil.

    Could you provide the actual links that show the correlation between violent crime and lead additives in gasoline and how they match so well?


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    There's a lot of work being done on blood concentrations of lead in children at Port Pirie, the South Australian lead smelting town. There are ample references to effects on intelligence and I've not seen one, not one, on delinquency or criminal behaviour in people who've grown up there. It certainly isn't any kind of hotspot for violent crime. And the people who are now young adults there didn't have the controls on backyard soils, sandpits, toy washing and all the rest of it when they were very young that have been in force for the last decade or so to control lead ingestion and to get rid of excess blood concentrations.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    There's an article about violent craziness caused by manganese poisoning - do a google search for "mark purdey," "to the ends of the earth."

    Not only that, but prescription psychiatric drugs, such as antidepressants, are suspected for the sudden rise in a particular type of crime, the 'go out in public and shoot a bunch of people and then kill yourself' type of murder, which only began happening in recent years, during the same time when prescription psychiatric drugs started becoming more prevalent. These drugs can cause violent behavior, sometimes as a result of taking the drugs, other times as a result of withdrawing from the drugs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    All of your links lead directly to the science forum homepage...
    The original article: Tetraethyllead - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    The Impact of Childhood Lead Exposure on Crime: http://www3.amherst.edu/~jwreyes/pap...BERWP13097.pdf
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    There's a lot of work being done on blood concentrations of lead in children at Port Pirie, the South Australian lead smelting town. There are ample references to effects on intelligence and I've not seen one, not one, on delinquency or criminal behaviour in people who've grown up there. It certainly isn't any kind of hotspot for violent crime. And the people who are now young adults there didn't have the controls on backyard soils, sandpits, toy washing and all the rest of it when they were very young that have been in force for the last decade or so to control lead ingestion and to get rid of excess blood concentrations.
    The research was done by the NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
    1050 Massachusetts Avenue
    Cambridge, MA 02138
    May 2007
    I would especially like to thank Lawrence Katz for valuable advice, as well as David Cutler, Leemore
    Dafny, Amy Finkelstein, This research was supported
    by grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Bureau of Economic Research, the National
    Institute on Aging, and the Harvard Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy. The
    views expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National
    Bureau of Economic Research.

    Could you quote your australian research?
    If the NBER's measurements are not reliable, what justified the investment in lead emissions reduction?
    The people with reduced IQ (confined to poor academic performance and poor market performance) got help from government in order to detox their bodies?

    The Clean Air Act, eliminated the Tetraethyllead in gasoline which increased the cost of production of the gasoline. They assured the cost is compensated with the reductions of crime, teenage pregnancy, poor academic performance, poor labor marketperformance, and divorce.




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    Much more widespread and pervasive, are the hormone-disrupting chemicals detectable in virtually every living human being today. No one seems to consider this topic worthy of in-depth consideration, it seems. Hormone-mimicking chemicals have definitely been linked to erratic behavior, often violent and aggresive, not to mention the tendency to cause obesity.

    An attempt I made to generate interest in this subject in my hometown forum was met with comments questioning my mental state....... jocular
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    Here's the reference to the original study. If you look at the right hand column there are links to the later research on the same cohort of children.
    Port Pirie Cohort study: childhood blood lead and neuropsychological development at age two years.

    As for reducing the exposures and treatment for individuals with very high readings, yes, that was all arranged by the government. I remember reading a few years ago about soil testing in back gardens where people wanted to grow their own vegetables as well as home nurse type contacts about washing ordinary inside toys as well as outdoor play equipment and washing inside surfaces rather than dusting or dry wiping them. It's also pretty annoying for people living in a dry sunny place like Port Pirie not being able to dry clothes in the sunshine on an outside line because of the lead dust in the air. It's practically a full-time job keeping lead out of toddlers' mouths for a couple of years.

    I'm not sure that the government didn't get some money from the smelting company as well as getting them to change their processes.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    As for reducing the exposures and treatment for individuals with very high readings, yes, that was all arranged by the government. I remember reading a few years ago about soil testing in back gardens where people wanted to grow their own vegetables as well as home nurse type contacts about washing ordinary inside toys as well as outdoor play equipment and washing inside surfaces rather than dusting or dry wiping them.
    Once young people failed in university, because their IQs was reduced, does the government chelated their bodies, or did anything in order to increase their IQs?
    These people were confined to be unsuccesful?


    The NBER's research describes the impact on IQ:

    Increased lead levels are also associated with decreased mental skills, including reduced
    IQ, reduced verbal competence, increased reading disabilities, and reduced academicperformance.

    22.
    The effect on IQ has been debated extensively, but the consensus is that an
    increase in blood lead level of 1μg/dL produces a decrease of approximately one-half of an IQ point, without any safe threshold.

    23.
    This means that two children who are otherwise identical but
    whose lead levels differ by 15 μg/dL (approximately the decline in lead levels between 1976 and 1990) would exhibit an average IQ difference of 7.5 points.

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    I see, in both cases, the emissions are pretty different

    The Port Pirie Lead Smelting Cohort is a company, and its pollution probably is composed merely by inorganic lead
    In the case of the Tetraethyllead, it is a compound, a more complex substance, for this reason its health impact includes a bigger spectrum, i guess.
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