Notices
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Myelinogenesis, myelination

  1. #1 Myelinogenesis, myelination 
    Forum Freshman Amaranth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    35
    Does it happen throughout life or not? If one disrupts this process, will he/she have damage of neurons? Or is all the myelin made in the early age of a human and taking supplements that inhibit myelination or an avitaminosis later won't have an effect?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,227
    Myelin is like any other tissue. Once it is developed, it is sustained by normal cell processes. Myelinogenesis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Avitaminosis is not very common. The best known demyelinating disease is multiple sclerosis, but there are several others (I've got one of them). Demyelinating disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    There's not a lot that can be done to directly remyelinate nerves that have a damaged myelin sheath. Therapy to maintain whatever function persists is the only avenue available as far as I know apart from surgeries to reconstruct joints distorted by muscle failure.


    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman Amaranth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    35
    So avitaminosis isn't a problem at all after you've resolved it? I think I've heard that B12 deficiency leads to demyelination, but if it's such a finely regenerating substance, then once you have eliminated what's disrupting its synthesis, the patient's myelin should be all fine again after some time, right?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,227
    Not so sure for dietary or other issues, I only know a bit about neurological diseases and genetic disorders.

    I'd suspect that anyone who'd had neurological symptoms for an extended period might sustain some permanent damage. A neurologist could do a standard evaluation of someone in this position, and maybe suggest adjunct therapies to enhance improvements as the B12 status normalises. Such patients would probably have other assessments done to see whether the problem is just the dietary deficiency or if there is also a problem with the liver processing / over-excreting B12.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •