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Thread: Fleece new born blanket, wash it befor gifting.....?

  1. #1 Fleece new born blanket, wash it befor gifting.....? 
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    A friend of mine from work and his (partner?) are expecting a baby on the 27th of Nov.
    I have made a double faced fleece blanket, with the tied fringe strips, for the baby.
    Should I wash it before giving it to them or, be sure to have them wash it before using it?
    I don't know her at all but I know he ( my friend) would be certain to wash the blanket before use.

    The next question is, if I wash the blanket what should I use for soap, if any.
    The material is brand new and has stayed clean while cutting and sewing but, I'm thinking about any lint or dust from the fleece causing problems for the baby.
    I have made several of these blankets before but never for a new born so I don't know what the normal procedure would be.
    I'm also wondering if there will be any shrinkage of the material or puckering of the seams? I used 100% poly thread as I usually do.
    I am expecting that the fringes will curl and "tube" a bit.


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  3. #2  
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    For anything delicate I wash by hand in a mild shampoo (meant for humans not pets). After rinsing I put the item between a couple of bath towels and roll up, gently, and press, gently, to get rid of excess water. This means that the item won't be pulled out of shape by the weight of dripping water. For rinsing, be a bit careful about choosing a fabric softener or rinse aid. Anything too highly perfumed is a big no-no for babies.

    If you're concerned about curling or puckering, you could lay the item flat and stretch it gently and pin to the surface in the same way as you might do for a lace or crocheted item. Then hang or lay the joined items carefully. The whole objective of doing this for lace is to cut down on ironing time. It's a bit different for your purposes but it could save a bit of fussing and fidgeting - and the last thing you'd want would be to flatten a soft and fluffy item by frantically ironing stuff flat. If you do have to press it, don't press. Hold the steam over but away from direct contact with the fabric after you've pinned or otherwise secured it into shape, or put a damp cloth between the iron and the fabric.


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    Thanks

    I'd want to get all the chemicals and factory "funk" off before giving it away. (And maybe to be sure the fabric could handle washing.... you just never know...).

    An internet site recommends non-detergent soap approved for use with babies.
    Other have expressed a concern over using any kind of soap at all, however. That chemical sensitivity in newborns is a great concern when more children will be born, and suggests that parents should not use any soap on the blanket.(surely it alludes to soap residues, they are difficult to rinse)

    Others recommendations (often contradictory) about a method for chemicals and factory ''funk'' washing out:

    -Warm water (inside the washing machine? at what temperature?) rinse and spin the blanket a few times.
    -Cold wash, neutral soap, quick or line dry.
    -Regular soap and 2 or 3 rinses. Hang to dry. If a newborn is sensitive to that leftover residue, imagine what the treatment chemicals would do.
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  5. #4  
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    I have another question; since the polar fleece is white, that means it has been bleached with harmful chemicals? From: How Products are Made: How polyester fleece is made - material, making, used, structure, steps, product, machine, Raw Materials, The Manufacturing Process of polyester fleece, Byproducts/Waste

    Polyester Fleece Dyeing


    • The textile manufacturer buys polyester from the yarn manufacturer on these spools. The yarn is next immersed in heated dye vats in the part of the factory called the dye house. In case of yarn made from green recycled PET bottles, the dye must be a dark hue. Other yarns arrive bleached white, and these can be dyed any color desired. After dyeing, workers feed the yarn through a drying machine.

    So maybe the cloth should be soaked (in warm water and mild shampoo) overnight.
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  6. #5  
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    I wouldn't. Delicate fabrics don't respond well to soaking.

    If you're worried about chemicals, I'd rinse it thoroughly in plain water before washing, then another whole rinse after washing before any finishing touches with softener or rinse aid.

    The more frequent changes of water will do a more thorough job without risking matting or shrinkage you might get with soaking or using too high a temperature water.

    Remember babies all over the world have clothes and other items made all over the world. A lot of people wouldn't think twice about the things that you're raising. Your gift has been made with care. Give it just a little more care and it will be fine. If the parents ask about these issues, tell them that you used four or six or however many changes of water it turns out to be just to be on the safe side. And remember wrap it well before giving. (And not be surprised if the mother or grandmother washes it along with every thing else - because that's what they do with everything.)
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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