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Thread: Constipation – the All-American Movement

  1. #1 Constipation – the All-American Movement 
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    Read:
    The McDougall Newsletter September 2002 - Perfect BM





    my comment to this article:
    Found while looking for a solution for a perfect BM :| response after reading below.
    Bullshit, 1-3 BMs a day normal. I eat vegetables and fruit, noodles, bread and occasionally a bit of meat with a quart of water every few hours and some diet coke. I have horrible experiences producing a BM and without medication produce 1 BM every five days to a week; with meds I can go every day and feel a sense of satisfaction afterwards.Bullshit, what did I do to deserve this.
    I've suffered for years, done everything to resolve the problem; seen countless doctors too nothing helped; I must be damaged.


    The video below is exactly how I feel, I was happy when I found it because it's a perfect vid for what I felt when I read the article.



    Last edited by Japith; November 10th, 2012 at 09:42 PM.
    scheherazade likes this.
    With bravery and recognition that we are harbingers of our destiny and with a paragon of virtue.
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  3. #2  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    A timely topic when you consider how many over the counter digestive aids are sold annually, even in most retail grocery stores.

    Regular elimination can be elusive for many and there are additional factors besides diet. Stress can also contribute to constipation in my observation and I observe the elimination of my horses daily because the first indicator of anything being amiss will come from their appetite and bowl function.

    For myself, I observe that when I ingest any significant amount of noodles and breads, even rye bread, my elimination becomes much slower. Yams, split pea soup, stewed prunes, flax seed, whole natural almonds (which I soften in water) and green tea seem to aid the cause.

    Have you tried going gluten free or nearly so for a while? I remember making a paste with simply flour and water when I was in grade school. We were building a paper mache landscape as I recall. Once that stuff dried at low heat (think body temperature) the stuff became like concrete. Makes you wonder what it does inside the gut...

    I also get plenty of whole body exercise between my work and tending the horses and I know that horses too need plenty of movement to keep their digestive system primed.


    westwind and question for you like this.
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  4. #3  
    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    MMAAATEEE, Im just like one of your horses. ( what a terrible descriptive word, scheherazade. Nags, no. Equinine Animal. No. Four legged beast. No. ) It's the harsh "hor ". that I object to.

    Lets try Lateral Thinking. If we break up the word to it's Latin or otherwise derivatives we may get a clue. ( And then compile a nicer sounding name ).

    In the meanwhile I'll offer a couple of suggestions. Barrel Organ with Legs. No that will never do. Snorting Head Tossing Thresher. No. MyCobber. Yep, that sounds a little better. I'm going out to saddle up MyCobber.

    How many Members relate to this little discussion with the understanding that the project you may be working on needs upending every now and then and smashing with a baseball bat, just to see what falls out?

    Its when you sift through the pieces that realisation may dawn. But you must have your brain in gear. Othwise take up Tiddly Winks.

    But about the need for exercise and movement in helping to avoid Constipation. Yes, and also to avoid putting on fat deposits that push for space in the abdomen etc, reduce muscle wastage, etc.

    No, lubricants work. Castor oil. Prune Juice. Hot Curries. MyCobbers do have trouble with the Hot Curries. westwind.
    Words words words, were it better I caught your tears, and washed my face in them, and felt their sting. - westwind
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  5. #4  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Horses have many other terms that they are known by depending on the region they are from, their breeding, their purpose or their way of going. Some of the feral horses are known as mustangs, brumbies or cayuses. Cowboys often refer to their mounts as cowponies from their use in herding cattle. The mount of a knight was called a destrier and the term 'palfrey' usually referred to the most expensive and highly-bred types of riding horse during the Middle Ages. A hunter is an English term for a horse that could travel cross country and jump obstacles.

    Steed is another term for a horse, especially one that is spirited or swift and perhaps best describes my own animals, they being well bred Morgan mares and the colt by one of the mares is sired by a stallion of Morgan and Appendix Quarterhorse bloodlines, a combination much favored for cavalry remounts according to my stepfather, whose grandmother bred animals for such purpose in the days of Louis Riel. The Morgan/TB/QH cross resulted in an animal of exceptional endurance and temperament, encompassing the hardiness of the Morgan, the spirit of the Thoroughbred and the sensible nature and versatility of the Quarter Horse.

    By reason of their significant elimination (8-13 times a day) and in keeping with the subject of this thread, a less complimentary term for the species is "Sh-tter", rhymes with "critter".

    I frequently refer to the 'wild bunch' as 'ponies' because I have had them all from a fairly young age. They are all 15HH (60 inches at the shoulder) with one of the mares nearer to 15:1HH. Handy, the young gelding, looks like he will match her when he is grown. This one is Caramel, my endurance mount, taken on June 21st, 3 years ago. We rode about 42 miles that day, climbing above treeline toward Golden Horn Mountain.

    question for you likes this.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    The perfect BM? Ahh! The Holy Grail of defecation, Peristaltic Waves of Joy. What constitutes Dump Nirvana, or what's known in the vernacular as a Good Shit? Whether solid, liquid or somewhere in between, some have hailed it as better than sex. The afterglow of satisfaction and relief is a feeling difficult to match or recreate in the normal walk of life.

    The best ways to attain the perfect BM are usually personal. It must begin with a visit to the throne, a seat of deep concentration. For the most part, the throne's construction is not important, as it could vary from mink lined gold to just an ordinary tree branch. Its importance lies in the ability to allow the user the most sanitary method of delivering the payload. As already noted, the payload comes in various styles, yet artistry isn't a major part of the perfect BM but it could add a measure of aesthetic value to the final emotional gratification. Usually the payload lessens the degree of uncomfortableness experienced by the individual prior to the undertaking. The undertaking has the potential to be quite therapeutic. For example, pain and nausea are two symptoms that go from bad to good when conditions are right.

    Throne, payload and undertaking, three necessary components for a good shit. The last and most important is the post-discharge euphoric mindset. This is when the the whole experience is judged. In many cases it happens involuntarily but its better to compare the event with other notably satisfying moments that have occurred in one's own life.

    Warning: Messy is not good. Unsanitary conditions as well. Involuntary underwear stainers a definite no-no.

    ***Sorry, I have to GO now.
    Last edited by zinjanthropos; November 11th, 2012 at 01:00 PM.
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    A very honest account of the personal experience known as dumping. I love it.

    Reading about the throne being a seat of deep concentration I remembered a crude joke (which I cannot resist sharing):

    What does a mathemation and a constipated person have in common?

    They both sit down and work out problems with a pencil.
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    *A mathemation is a name often given to a mathematician (or how ever one spells the word) by people between the ages of 2 and 8... and also by me.
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  9. #8  
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    MMAAATEEE, Im just like one of your horses.
    You like being ridden by cowboys?
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  10. #9  
    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    For zinjanthropos. Now you are on the ball thropo. Nothing wrong with showing expertise in the basic biological functions. The construction of excellent litery work, as you have almost illustrated here, is very similar to what must be achieved when constructing the means to functional passing of Waste Material.

    Dosen't this give you the Zhipqits!!!

    Really thropo, my Poste here is to compliment you on your input to The Science Forum. No bullshit. I believe, modestly I hope, that we have a better FORUM now then when I joined. Seems to me that individually we have moved up a notch. Taking just a little bit more care with our Postes, and making them count a little more.

    If we are prepared to sit down and read, digest, and think about Threads and Postes on The Science Forum, always willing to contribute something useful where possible, then the time we take should, in the overall analysis, reflect our true intent.

    And that is, yes, we are here for the ride, the scenery might be interesting, and we just might make a difference.

    I believe you make a difference. Take a thumbs up. westwind.
    Words words words, were it better I caught your tears, and washed my face in them, and felt their sting. - westwind
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  11. #10  
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    Nothing complicated here.

    If you eat enough fibre, and are still constipated, then you are sick and should see your doctor.

    That is about it. Except that you need to study up on dietary fibre. A lot of people think they are eating enough, but don't actually appreciate how little fibre is in their normal food.
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  12. #11  
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    Don't forget the other side of the issue, exercise. If you're getting enough exercise, then you might need your doctor to refer you to someone who can teach you some pelvic floor exercises.

    But I think skeptic's probably on the money here. If you shifted your diet to mainly vegetables, preferably dominated by green vegetables (and in that I don't include beans and peas - they count as a protein food for these purposes), with very little of the starchy foods like noodles, pasta, pastry or bread, with protein from fish a couple of times a week and meat only rarely and in small servings you might find things improving after a week or two. Then you can gradually add back in eggs and dairy products for another couple of weeks. And so on.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  13. #12  
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    Don't exclude high fibre starchy foods. Many breads, for example, based on wholemeal and with lots of seeds added, are very high in fibre.
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    I know that skeptic. I'm afraid I've seen too many people claiming to have a good Mediterranean-style diet with whole wheat pasta and breads, and when you look at what they actually eat you see far too much meat, far too much fatty or otherwise calorie loaded sauces, and far too little of the high vegetable content, really light weight traditional diet they think they're eating.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  15. #14  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
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    I am a bit biased in favour of bread at the moment. About a year ago, my wife and I bought a breadmaker. She immediately told me it was my job. I dug up a recipe, and decided it was not good enough. I modified it by doing things like reducing salt and adding various seeds etc. I now make a delicious bread, which hot from the breadmaker is like the gods own nectar, and which is so full of fibre that it makes me crap like an equine.

    Just as well we put in the high capacity sewage treatment system!
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  16. #15  
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    Our breadmaker went to electronic heaven several years ago now. There's nothing like being woken on a cold morning by the smell of bread ready to come out of its little personal oven. I miss it.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  17. #16  
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    Adelady
    Buy yourself another.
    We are making bread for about $NZ 1-00 per loaf.
    If we bought an equivalent loaf from a bakery, it would cost about $5 to $8 per loaf.
    We paid for that breadmaker after about 6 months, and now 12 months on, it is still going strong. A breadmaker makes excellent sense money wise. Not to mention delicious and healthy food.
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  18. #17  
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    I'm thinking about it, but we won't make any decisions like that until after the kitchen's been replaced and we get some real, honest-to-dog bench space. Right now it'd be a real problem to cut down the little space we've got.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  19. #18  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    The following article makes the point that we are all different and have a varying range of triggers and tolerances. There is no 'one size fits all' remedy for constipation although dietary fiber and exercise are commonly cited as beneficial for most. I found the information on foods that may lead to constipation quite interesting as it mentions some that may not come to mind for most.

    Foods that cause constipation
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  20. #19  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
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    I would warn people from taking sheherazade's reference too seriously. I only read the first few paragraphs and already came across a number of points that are dubious, to say the least.

    Take gluten and milk products. These are totally and utterly harmless unless you are one of a minority that have a genetic intolerance. That is about 1% of the population. The advice to avoid gluten, for example, is utter and complete bullsh!t unless, and only unless, you suffer celiac disease. For the other 99% of the population, gluten is a healthy protein that is a positive addition to the diet.

    Ditto lactose intolerance. Milk and milk products are a positive addition to your diet, if you avoid high fat varieties. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1003163740.htm

    As I said, if you consume lots of fibre and are still constipated, there is something wrong with you and you should see your doctor. Your doctor can discuss the unlikely possibility that you have celiac disease, and suggest ways to find out.

    Exercise is strongly - very strongly - recommended for good health, but is not terribly likely to be a palliative for constipation, despite those who push this idea. There is a very basic idea in exercise science. This is so damn obvious that some people ignore it. That is : if you want a muscle to get stronger, you have to exercise that exact muscle. If you want strong biceps, then exercising your abs will not do it.

    In exactly the same way, if you want to exercise the muscles that prevent constipation, you do not do it by going jogging. You have to exercise the gut muscles, and that is done by putting fibre into the gut so that the gut muscles have something to push against. Strong leg muscles will not do it.

    Another thing I saw was the idea that cooking meat makes it hard to digest. The reverse is true. Cooking makes meat easier to digest.

    We need to be careful about what crackpot ideas we pull off the internet.
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  21. #20  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    The link I supplied does cite peer reviewed articles.

    (1) Iacono G, Cavataio F, Montalto G, Florena A, Tumminello M, Soresi M, Notarbartolo A, Carroccio A. "Intolerance of cow's milk and chronic constipation in children." N Engl J Med. 1998 Oct 15;339(16):1100-4.
    (2) Daher S, Tahan S, Solé D, Naspitz CK, Da Silva Patrício FR, Neto UF, De Morais MB. "Cow's milk protein intolerance and chronic constipation in children". Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2001 Dec;12(6):339-42.
    (3) Irastorza I, Ibañez B, Delgado-Sanzonetti L, Maruri N, Vitoria JC. "Cow's-milk-free diet as a therapeutic option in childhood chronic constipation". J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010 Aug;51(2):171-6.

    This is in reference to milk proteins, not milk sugars.
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  22. #21  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
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    That is fine, scheherazade
    It is the over-generalisation that I disapprove of. If someone is intolerant to milk, they need to avoid it. But most of us tolerate milk just fine, and both milk and milk products, if low fat, are a healthy addition to our diets.
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  23. #22  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    That is fine, scheherazade
    It is the over-generalisation that I disapprove of. If someone is intolerant to milk, they need to avoid it. But most of us tolerate milk just fine, and both milk and milk products, if low fat, are a healthy addition to our diets.
    Thank you for that minor concession skeptic.

    I would classify your remark that most tolerate milk products to likewise be a generalization. In North America, the dairy industry is big money and most in this country have become accustomed to dairy as a significant percentage of their diet, accounting for between 16-22% of retail sales in the stores I have worked in for the last seven years.

    Lately, there has been a huge increase in the number of low-fat yogurt entering the marketplace, all of it containing corn starch and pectin to thicken. The couple I have tried taste like paste, lol. There are only three yogurts I find palatable of the dozens we offer, my own purely subjective field testing.

    Another observation is that an increasing number of people are selecting alternate beverages to milk, among them almond milk, rice milk and soy milk.

    For those who think to 'settle' all matters with a 'digestive aid', I observe that a common brand name has not been reintroduced to our store since it was recalled almost a year ago.
    18 antacids involved in recalls
    Here are products that have been recalled and how to find out when they will be available.
    RolaidsRecall.com | Information about the Rolaids RecallRolaidsRecall.com

    Ingestion, digestion and elimination are all components of an integrated system and I call question on a food supply system that requires digestive aids be marketed alongside it's 'healthy' selections. The irony slays me.

    "One man's meat is another man's poison," is a saying that has been around for a while...
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  24. #23  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    I call question on a food supply system that requires digestive aids be marketed alongside it's 'healthy' selections. The irony slays me.
    Which I agree with.
    If a person has a good balanced diet, and eats sensibly, then they will not, with a few exceptions, have problems with constipation, digestion, etc. The exceptions are those few people with specific food intolerances. For some it is milk, some soy beans, some peanuts, some gluten etc. But for the vast majority, all those foods are healthy additions to their diet.
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