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Thread: Tuberculosis!

  1. #1 Tuberculosis! 
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    My mother was diagnosed with TB and the x-ray reveals that her left lung is totally damaged. she has severe coughing and throat pain. Docs say that she will be well in about 1 month. I find lack of transparency in my talk with the doc. please help me out !!!


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    I'd want to find out what "well" means. And what does "damaged" mean. Bad bronchitis or pleurisy or pneumonia will show significant signs on x-rays.

    The doc might have prescribed suitable medications to relieve the throat pain and maybe control the coughing. If her condition is better described as bronchitis or similar condition, those medications might solve the problem within 3 or 4 weeks.

    Has she had a positive sputum test? That would indicate active TB. If she's just had a positive skin test, that would indicate latent TB which isn't normally treated afaik. Has the doc signed her up for regular medication and treatment from a TB clinic? Treatment of active TB is a long and demanding process.

    Might be best to check for more details.

    Edit: I forgot. Are you vaccinated against TB? Did the doc check your immune status? That's also worth following up.


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    she had positive sputum test
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    What about you?
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  6. #5  
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    negative
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    Usually that is a normal followup, unless it's not an infective variant, which makes TBC simply an antibiotic resistant opportunist. Hence he doesn't need checkup.. It looks that way because of the positive thought of the doctors.

    Pathogenesis

    About 90% of those infected with M. tuberculosis have asymptomatic, latent TB infections (sometimes called LTBI),[42] with only a 10% lifetime chance that the latent infection will progress to overt, active tuberculous disease.[43] In those with HIV, the risk of developing active TB increases to nearly 10% a year.[43] If effective treatment is not given, the death rate for active TB cases is up to 66%.[3]



    Also many people are carriers for tbc, it's the immunodeficient part of the population that should worry..
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    she is a diabetic, is diabetes one of the reason of she getting affected ?
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    no, she's probably one of the 10%... though stress may be a factor where her immune system was temporarily affected. Though she's getting better now, so the stress may have already been relieved..
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Zwolver. She's got a positive sputum test. It's active. All the rest of what might or might not have happened is irrelevant.

    Osborne. First things first. Get yourself and anyone else in the household up to date with vaccinations. And then find out what the doctor means by only a month to get "well". Find out what the longer term treatment plan is. Perhaps the doc needs to get your mum through whatever this acute phase is before moving onto the general TB management plan.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Active TB usually requires a prolonged course of daily medication. It is not my specialty but I seem to recall that daily medication must be taken by mouth for a year to 18 months. It is very important for her to complete the entire course of treatment.

    You statement that one lung is "totally damaged" concerns me. That sounds like she is seriously ill. People can function with only one lung but it is not easy. I agree that the doctor 's "one month" to wellness seems unrealisticly optimistic. Perhaps he is talking about only to recovery from the acute phase of treatment.
    Also what is your mother's age? 50 year olds recover from things that kill 80 year olds.
    Her diabetes should not be a problem if it is under control.
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    her age is 50 and her TB-Genotype Drug Resistance test says
    Genotype results : Mycobacterium Tuberculosis complex detected
    Rifampicin : Resistant
    Isoniazid : Resistant
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    Her Smear for A.F.B. test
    specimen : Sputum
    Stain : Ziehl-Neelsen's stain
    result : Acid Fast Bacilli seen(3+)
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    So that means that your mother is in for a very long period of treatment with several simultaneous courses of drugs. Adherence to such a regime is very difficult and will not be cheap. One thing you will need to ensure is that the whole family fully understands is that there is no option but for her to take her medication - as prescribed, on time, without fail, every day. As many times a day as are required. It does not mean that they can ever, ever accept that the medications, or any one of them, can ever, ever be skipped for a day or a dose because the patient feels better today or hates a side-effect or wants to save some money.

    The first thing you need to find out is whether her current doctor is qualified and experienced in designing and delivering such treatment. My personal preference would be for a specialist clinic set up to deal with such cases.
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    Hmm.. I wonder though, as i had no idea what treatment was administered to TBC patients, why it has to ben for such a long time. I know it's extremely resilient, and it's mucal layer protects it from many antigens.

    But 12-18 months? This is no bacteria that can become MORE resistance to antibiotics. At least not in it's genetic structure.. It is a bacteria that is good in hiding away for a long time, still there would be practically no difference between 12-18 months or 12-18 years.. Treatments are kinda weird, maybe that's why i don't come up with them..
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    It mutates.

    So the one drug you're taking might get to 80% success within a few months, but meanwhile a mutation or two or three are undoing all the good work and you need to head them off at the pass. So you take multiple drugs right from the start - and when the "first-line" drugs are useless because of specific resistance (those mutations) you have to take a larger number of drugs to try and cover your bases. And you need to keep on retesting the whole time you're undergoing treatment to pick up the possibility that a new mutation is making you sick again.

    Wiki is your friend. Read all the way to the bottom. Tuberculosis management - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    TB is a bacterial disease, and most (still) respond to antibiotics. The problem is that patients become free of symptoms (they feel 'well') before all the bacteria are dead. When the doctor says your mother will be well in a month, it is probably correct. But she will probably not be free of bacteria in a month. It is vitally important she follow the treatment through to completion before she stops taking the medication, or she may fall sick again, and be even harder to treat.
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    Yes, but antibiotics rarely kill off all bacteria. It is supposed to weak the bacteria enough, to make the body clean them up themselves.

    I agree that all treatments must be completed, and that this is vital in becoming well again.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    She has left all her symptoms behind, she coughs rarely, no sore throat, etc. she takes her medicines correctly and on time. But she has lost a lot of weight almost 15 kgs. she is diabetic. please suggest some food to make her gain normal weight. she has become shinny.
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    She has left all her symptoms behind ....... she has lost a lot of weight
    Losing weight is a sign (rather than a symptom like coughing) that the TB is still affecting her.

    The big thing is to keep up her strength with good quality food - and watch to see that her appetite holds up. Good quality food, and enough of it, and at sensible intervals ..... all these things matter. If her appetite becomes a problem, back to the doctor promptly. But you can't expect too much of her body - to put on weight steadily while it's doing so much hard work coping with the TB.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osborne View Post
    She has left all her symptoms behind, she coughs rarely, no sore throat, etc. she takes her medicines correctly and on time. But she has lost a lot of weight almost 15 kgs. she is diabetic. please suggest some food to make her gain normal weight. she has become shinny.
    Unless she was doing a fair amount of exercise and trying to lose weight, she's still in a battle with the TB. It's hard to suggest what foods she should take as it depends on what and how much she currently is eating and keep down. Make sure she avoids as much low quality food as possible, maintains well-hydrated and eats at regular intervals. With the weight loss, it's important to make sure her diabetes is under control, otherwise it's another issue she has to face, with coping TB being as hard as it is. If her diet doesn't improve or she continues to lose weight, then it's time to contact the doctor.
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  22. #21  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Losing weight is a sign (rather than a symptom like coughing) that the TB is still affecting her.
    Not to nitpick, but losing weight is a sign of overall pressure on the system. This can be due to excercise, a tapeworm, tuberculosis, any illness, many medicine. It's not a sign that it is, but it might still be affecting her.

    TB is an opportunistic, but it's not a bacteria that works like borrelia, you'll heal from it a lot easier. It should get better from now on..

    EDIT: I withdraw my previous statement about not working like borrelia. I have now read that it can return from a dormant infection. And thus it is even worse..
    Last edited by Zwolver; August 31st, 2012 at 10:21 AM.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    I my father got his sputum checked, the report says negtive. I had my X-Ray done as i m not able to give my sputum, the doctor says it is normal. We in India live in small houses so is there any chance of i having latent TB. I had a word with my doc he says there are no vaccinations available in India. If they are available please reply. what symptoms are associated with tb ?
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  24. #23  
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    Usual TB is usually asymptomatic, but lethal in 50% of the cases if untreated. Only immune deficient people usually get it. Like in HIV high area's.

    Wiki Quote.
    The classic symptoms of active TB infection are a chronic cough with blood-tinged sputum, fever, night sweats, and weight loss (the latter giving rise to the formerly prevalent term "consumption"). Infection of other organs causes a wide range of symptoms.
    It's a pretty nasty illness, like TB usually gives. The other disease that is caused by Mycobacterium, is leprae, and all know the symptoms of that one. Still Mycobacterium is evolutionary, and in biotechnology very interesting.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  25. #24  
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    Only immune deficient people usually get it
    That applies only in areas where it was previously eliminated or substantially reduced. TB was extremely common virtually everywhere a couple of centuries ago. A hundred years ago it was about as common as cancer in the industrialised world.
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    I my father got his sputum checked, the report says negtive. I had my X-Ray done as i m not able to give my sputum, the doctor says it is normal. We in India live in small houses so is there any chance of i having latent TB. I had a word with my doc he says there are no vaccinations available in India. If they are available please reply. what symptoms are associated with tb ?
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    I have little tiredness, no productive coughing just a slight irritation, my x-ray is normal. do i have active TB, I have heard that night sweats and productive coughing are the major symptoms, plzz help me....
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    This is the general wiki overview. Tuberculosis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The big thing to keep in mind is that the great majority, 90-95%, of people who've been infected with tuberculosis never develop the full-blown, active illness. And that usually happens when some other illness or immune-compromising condition provokes the flare-up.

    So your job is to stay healthy. Eat well, sleep well and take care of yourself. Have regular medical check-ups. And keep an eye out between check-ups for the group of symptoms that indicate a flare-up and go to the doctor for an extra visit. If it turns out to be the real deal, the sooner you start the appropriate therapy, even though it's tedious, boring and onerous, the more likely you are to get through it without too much damage.
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