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Thread: I am worried Please help.

  1. #1 I am worried Please help. 
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    I am not a chain smoker or a heavy smoker, I just smoke 2 cigs. per day or may be 4 sometimes. My father has asthma. I have heard that it can be hereditary, will my smoking habit lead to asthma. And how can I know the toxicity of a particular brand, and please suggest me some methods to reduce the chances of cancer without quitting smoking.


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  3. #2  
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    Quit smoking. All brands are the same. Astma is hereditary, but I'm not sure if it could be directly induced by smoking (though I have read that it can be caused by pollution so I don't see why smoking can't cause it). To be honest, you shouldn't really worry about astma, you are at much greater risk of getting lung cancer, heart attacks, ulcers, becoming impotent and some other pretty serious stuff. If you only smoke 2 cigs a day, you can easily quit. The easiest way I've heard of is getting an e-cig (which is much less bad for you - still not good) and tapering off.

    All the best, remember this is your health, it's serious stuff.
    Antoine


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  4. #3  
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    Technically speaking, 2 cigs a day will give you less risk of heart or lung disease than someone who regularly cooks dinner over an open charcoal fire. But their risk is not nil either.

    2 cigs a day is in the realm of habit rather than addiction - so give it up. If you're in the habit of smoking, you're leaving yourself open to graduating to real addiction if you happen to have a stressful event or period in your life - you might allow the habit to grow to more than the 2 per day. Then you're in real trouble if you decide to give it up. Remember, nicotine is more addictive than heroin even if the effects are different. Giving up the addiction is not a decision or a process you can take on lightly. So give it up now before you risk putting yourself in that position.

    As for the asthma. Smoking yourself or being around smokers can worsen or set off asthma if your metabolism is inclined that way, but it doesn't automatically follow. I remember beng at a function with someone who had serious asthma. I wondered aloud how she coped with the fact that there were several smokers present. She responded that it never bothered her, even if it was stuffy inside on a cold night with doors and windows closed - but if she went to the bathroom and there was one of those 'deodorising' sprays or blocks in use, she could drop like a stone with an anaphylactic style reaction.

    If you're worried about the family risk of asthma, next time you go to the doctor for a checkup, get them to do one of those lung function tests. It will give you a baseline for later comparison if there's no problem now. If there is a lung problem already, the doc can advise on management. The other thing the doc might check is your blood pressure and thyroid function. Some people use cigarettes as unconscious self-'medication' if they have low blood pressure or a slow metabolic rate - the nicotine gives the sluggish system a bit of a kick along. There are better ways to deal with such problems if you have them. Dealing with any such problem could make it easier to kick the evil weed.

    There is no method, no medication, no diet, no vitamins or minerals, no lifestyle choice available to reduce the toxicity of any level of smoking. Smoking is relaxing and enjoyable for many people. So are lots of other things. Look for one that you enjoy that's not toxic or dangerous in other ways.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  5. #4  
    Forum Bachelors Degree dmwyant's Avatar
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    I used to smoke cigarettes. I had a 1 to 2 pack a day habit. I now use electronic cigarettes and a pipe. I really recommend quitting. or switching to electronic while there are still some risks they are lessened with the electronics and you still get your nicotine. Plus electronic cigarettes can be smoked anywhere.
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    As a smoker, who wishes young, and therefore inherently dumb, me never started - I'd agree with everyone who has responded. Quit now, while you're ahead. It's not the Asthma you should be worrying about, it's definitely the formation of a nicotine addiction. Because even if you don't develop Asthma, you'll still get a smoker's cough - which is paralysed cilia that can no longer sweep all manners of filth away from your lungs.

    As others have said, quit now. Or else you can be like me and dream about all the money you had that somehow went up in... smoke.

    How does Smoking Affect the Cilia?
    ^ That on top of asthma would be terrible btw.
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  7. #6  
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    Thanx all for such advises, I will surely try to quit smoking.
    I got my BP checked which shows systolic140mm of Hg/diastolic105mm of Hg.
    Hypertension !!!!
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  8. #7  
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    With a diastolic reading of 105, there's no try about it.

    Remember, the smoke might damage your lungs, but the nicotine can definitely do very bad things to your heart. Go for it.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  9. #8  
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    Smoking is also unaccepted (lately) in social higher classes. Only the uneducated and less wealthy classes continue smoking. I kind of wonder why. Do they care less for their health?
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  10. #9  
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    "Do they care less for their health?"

    That's a mystery for any number of dangerous or toxic behaviours. People who drink to excess, eat vast quantities of junk food despite the fact that they're already 20 kilos overweight, concussed footballers who insist on returning to the game next week, resistance to seatbelts and safety helmets.

    And the over-riding issue for smoking - it really is biologically, desperately addictive. It's not a matter of choice or opinion like choosing to drive at silly speeds in wet weather or rockfishing without a buoyancy vest or refusing to use safety equipment in dangerous jobs because the worker doesn't understand or believe the dangers involved - more usually it's the 'it can't happen to me' attitude. Which often applies to people taking up smoking - I'm not weak, I won't get addicted.

    Smoking is more of an issue than these other behaviours and attitudes because once you start it is tremendously difficult to stop - which is the reason for all the various government programs restricting advertising and doing other things directed more at stopping people from getting started. In Australia there are constant advertisements about quitting - but one of the underlying messages is really directed at people who've not yet got onto the treadmill, making it look like an unattractive burden rather than a glamorous or smart thing to do. There's also a side issue medically speaking. Because of its effects on circulation and other metabolic functions, it can mask various conditions like low blood pressure as well as thyroid, adrenal or other hormone deficiencies and a few others.

    And for older people, you have to remember that only a few decades ago doctors were recommending smoking to people with what we now call mood disorders. Even now, many psychoactive drugs aren't wonderfully successful. Back then there weren't any such drugs at all. Smoking at least had the 'virtue' - one of the things that makes it so addictive - of being able both to relax and to perk up people who are either anxious or depressed or both at different times. There aren't too many drugs that can do that reliably. Smokers apparently smoke 'differently' depending on their mood, automatically, which means it has different immediate effects. Doesn't change the long-term effects on blood pressure or lungs or whatever.
    Last edited by adelady; May 14th, 2012 at 08:18 AM. Reason: typos
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  11. #10  
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    The faster you quit, the better. Although the pack-a-day-for-many-years smokers are pretty far down the hole, the body can still recover to an extent (as to what extent exactly I'm not sure), particularly the lungs which are mainly damaged. I don't know if the nicotine chemical itself does damage, but the addiction it causes is sure bad. Aside from the harmful smoke, many people forget about the tar that gradually builds up in your lungs and airways. However, in the list of health risks, including asthmatic reactions as you stated, I think the development of a cancerous condition is the worst possibility.

    And we all know that dread feel the very word "cancer" brings. I'm relatively young, and my parents are smokers. So all my life I've been inevitably inhaling second-hand fumes; hopefully I won't develop any consequential health problem... though I fear even worse for my parents. There are just so many persuasive reasons to not start, or if you've already started, to quit as soon as possible. In your case, I say again, quit as soon as possible, do whatever as long as it effectively takes. As long as it gets you closer to being cigarette free, then that's progress, isn't it? I've met one or two people in my life that have died due to smoking habits.

    Enjoy life to the fullest. Smoking in the end will only cause negativity.
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  12. #11  
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    I think the development of a cancerous condition is the worst possibility.
    Oh, I dunno. Spending the last 20 years of your life struggling to breathe with emphysema or having a foot or two amputated because of circulation problems aren't terribly thrilling either.

    My dad had smoking caused emphysema for many years. He lived to 87, so a lot of people might think that's not so bad. But watching him struggle more and more to breathe for the last 15-20 years was no picnic for him or for us. I knew someone in her early forties with serious emphysema. She actually had to have weekly chiro/physio treatments because she constantly strained her back with her tremendous efforts to breathe.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Excidium View Post
    The faster you quit, the better.
    This is false. As the body becomes dependant on nicotine, many processes in the body have been altered to deal with this nicotine. To stop directly, can cause mental/psychological stress, which in turn can cause vascular deprevation, and at times of stress the chance of a heart attack rise to above that of when you would be smoking. At some points in life, it's even safer to continue smoking, then to stop. Though this is on about the ages of 80+. Stopping on this age will most probably be lethal in less then a half year.

    Though blood levels turn to normal pretty fast, the stress and the psychological effects the lack of certain substances have will be hazardous to some people.

    http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/hea/9/4/466/
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Having had a chance to frequent a cancer hospital recently I've come away with the attitude that yes, you may be more genetically inclined to get cancer but why give it a chance by developing habits that increase the odds. I saw many people in the cancer ward that looked 20 years older than I gave them credit for. Each one I talked to admitted they smoked habitually. There was one guy who had cancer in his jaw and he simply looked hideous. I talked with his wife and she believes it was smoking that brought this on. I'm no oncologist but I started thinking that if I was predisposed genetically as a cancer risk then why smoke and aid the process. Personally I'm convinced that there are ways to avoid cancer, not smoking would be right at the top of the list. Problem is that no one knows if they'll get it and if you realize this then isn't it logical to not tempt fate. Quit now before you end up regretting it.
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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  15. #14  
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    Besides smoking, drinking is another top cause for cancer. So, don't smoke, and don't drink to much (alcohol). Then there are zones with an increased chance for cancer, like heavily urbanised area's, industrial zones, or near animal farms (due to viral contaminants, that however don't have the same impact on us then the animals, they DO however have a possibility to induce cancer.)
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  16. #15  
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    Hey guys, How is everything going on. BTW I assume that smoke lost of our life and money.If we want well life. So should everybody leave it smoke. Thanks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Excidium View Post
    The faster you quit, the better.
    This is false. As the body becomes dependant on nicotine, many processes in the body have been altered to deal with this nicotine. To stop directly, can cause mental/psychological stress, which in turn can cause vascular deprevation, and at times of stress the chance of a heart attack rise to above that of when you would be smoking. At some points in life, it's even safer to continue smoking, then to stop. Though this is on about the ages of 80+. Stopping on this age will most probably be lethal in less then a half year.

    Though blood levels turn to normal pretty fast, the stress and the psychological effects the lack of certain substances have will be hazardous to some people.

    http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/hea/9/4/466/
    You're correct. Of course quitting cold-turkey will have worse withdrawal symptoms than a gradual alleviation. But that is not what I meant.

    I meant faster in the sense that it is better to quick now, than later in life - not the actual rate of the quitting process itself. The faster you quit, the less your body is physically and psychologically dependent on smoking in the long-term, making it easier to quit. In other words, stop while you're at it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    I think the development of a cancerous condition is the worst possibility.
    Oh, I dunno. Spending the last 20 years of your life struggling to breathe with emphysema or having a foot or two amputated because of circulation problems aren't terribly thrilling either.

    My dad had smoking caused emphysema for many years. He lived to 87, so a lot of people might think that's not so bad. But watching him struggle more and more to breathe for the last 15-20 years was no picnic for him or for us. I knew someone in her early forties with serious emphysema. She actually had to have weekly chiro/physio treatments because she constantly strained her back with her tremendous efforts to breathe.
    Sorry for your father, and your friend Emphysema was certainly on my mind. I won't judge on any comparison of the possible conditions, especially cancer and emphysema. I can't imagine dealing with either. Thinking about it makes me wonder "Why?! Why in the world would you start in the first place?" Unlike other drugs, smoking as far as I know gives no substantial sensational pleasure at all. And for the image it gives, nobody actually thinks it's a "cool" thing anyway, even if it used to be.
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  19. #18  
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    smoking as far as I know gives no substantial sensational pleasure at all.
    In the absence of targeted medication, it's actually pretty good for managing depression or anxiety - or just simple relaxation for stress relief. That's why doctors used to recommend it.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  20. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    smoking as far as I know gives no substantial sensational pleasure at all.
    In the absence of targeted medication, it's actually pretty good for managing depression or anxiety - or just simple relaxation for stress relief. That's why doctors used to recommend it.
    And the first couple times you smoke, you experience a nicotine rush - which is incredibly relaxing.
    "Cultivated leisure is the aim of man."
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  21. #20  
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    If you can, from all of the evidence I have observed suggest that cannabis will help no end with cancer, arthritis, chest problems and many more. A vapouriser is the best way to inhale or it can also be ingested.



    Although at 500 for 30ml of sativex you better start saving, or get a good dealer
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  22. #21  
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    I think this is could be helpful for you. Toxicity Identification Evaluations
    Nothing is permanant.
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  23. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by steveaustin View Post
    I think this is could be helpful for you. Toxicity Identification Evaluations
    Steve I can see nothing here that would be helpful at all. I currently have very little reason to believe you are anything other than a troll, or a bot. To avoid suspension/banning, please respond with an proper explanation of how you think the linked item would be helpful.
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