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Thread: How high c-peptide to raise eyebrows?

  1. #1 How high c-peptide to raise eyebrows? 
    me1
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    I'm curious--trying to find medical studies on high c-peptide levels elevated with food intake. Normal range is 1.1-4.5 ng/ml. So far I've only found studies that mention "high" levels at around 10ish ng/ml. How high would be eye-brow raising high? Under what conditions would these highs be found?


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  3. #2  
    me1
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    Okay. Next question then. What exactly makes up c-peptide, as in its components?


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    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    I don't fully understand your question, the first one.

    C-peptide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    According to wiki, c-peptides are used in the body to create insulin. It's components would then be amino acids, a variety of simple ones. And where ive seen the picture from wikipedia, there is 1 special aminoacid that doesn't count as an amino acid in there. (can't recal the name, but it's the pentagon shaped one from the N-C in the main chain, it causes a bend of about 30 degree)

    I don't think there can be a high enough limit for the consumption of this peptide, as you can basically make anything from it.

    So what is your question?
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    me1
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    Thanks. I had read around and found c-peptide can be elevated in insulinoma and insulin resistance. They are such diverse conditions, I didn't know if c-peptide "highs" would be different in either condition. Would c-peptide be higher in insulinoma? Or, would c-peptide be higher in IR? Just trying to find out if high c-peptide and high insulin (postprandial) can distinguish between the two, based on how "high" the level is.
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    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    It is very difficult to say, if it's possible to say anything looking at the concentration of c-peptides. You could look at DNA level if a concentration of c-peptides has any effect on the production of any of those substances. Then if it has no effect on it, you can see if it is vice versa (if insulin has effect on the concentration of c-peptides), if both do not apply, then yes, you can tell by the concentration of c-peptides, by controlling pre/postprandial elements.

    But as anything that has not yet been tested, i'm not sure.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    And where ive seen the picture from wikipedia, there is 1 special aminoacid that doesn't count as an amino acid in there. (can't recal the name, but it's the pentagon shaped one from the N-C in the main chain, it causes a bend of about 30 degree)
    Proline

    C-peptide is a precursor for the synthesis of insulin as Zwolver pointed out. It is actually used as a biomarker to differentiate between the different types of hypoglycemia due to high insulin levels. If hypoglycemia is a result of excessive external insulin intake, then the c-peptide levels shouldn't be high since you are taking ready-made insulin, as opposed to being synthesized in the body. But, in the case of insulinoma as you mentioned or taking sulphonylureas (which block potassium ATP channels resulting in membrane depolarization, opening of voltage dependent calcium channels and consequent insulin release from pancreatic cells), then the level of plasma c-peptide should be high because there is an increase in insulin production by the body itself. So, in both cases the insulin levels are high, but you can differentiate one type from the other by looking at c-peptide levels as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by me1 View Post
    Thanks. I had read around and found c-peptide can be elevated in insulinoma and insulin resistance. They are such diverse conditions, I didn't know if c-peptide "highs" would be different in either condition. Would c-peptide be higher in insulinoma? Or, would c-peptide be higher in IR? Just trying to find out if high c-peptide and high insulin (postprandial) can distinguish between the two, based on how "high" the level is.
    How about blood glucose level to distinguish the two? I mean, it is expected that c-peptide levels would be high in both insulinoma and IR because both are associated with an increase in endogenous insulin production. But in insulinoma the increase in insulin production would result in hypoglycemia, but this would not be the case in IR, since in IR, the increase in insulin production is a sort of homeostatic response to hyperglycemia, in order to bring blood sugar levels back to normal. I don't know, but for me, looking at blood glucose level seems like the more obvious and simpler thing to do, unless there is a reason it can't be used, but I can't think of any such reason off the top of my head.
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