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Thread: "paleolithic" diet?

  1. #1 "paleolithic" diet? 
    Forum Sophomore Dkav's Avatar
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    There are scientists that propagate this theory, the premise is that there are anti-nutrients in grains, dairy and legumes. Seems like they have sound evidence backed with publications which I can post upon request. Does any one know or ever tried this "paleo" lifestyle, is this how we should be eating?


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  3. #2  
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    Give us the publications.


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    I do not like the label "paleolithic diet" which carries various connotations that are likely to be misleading. A modern diet can be just as good or better.

    There is actually nothing new in this. It has been known for many decades that a diet rich in processed carbohydrates is one prone to induce obesity, and type II diabetes. The main change in these 'paleolithic diets' is simply to cut down on this type of food.

    Good nutrition principles require a wide variety of foods to be eaten, including animal protein, fruits, vegetables, nuts, vegetable oils, and starchy food that is associated with high fibre content. Another type of diet that is similar to this is the 'Mediterranean diet' which is also healthy and reduces obesity, type II diabetes etc.

    So rather than talking of 'paleolithic diets', it is better to talk of diets with limited processed starches and sugars.
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    Still haven't had a chance to read the papers in any detail, but just glancing at them, they look like terribly small studies, looking at specific populations (or even pigs) and looking at a wide range of outcomes (given enough outcomes, you'll be able to find something that's statistically significant). I don't know if there's any other evidence, but this isn't nearly enough.
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    Forum Sophomore Dkav's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prometheus
    Still haven't had a chance to read the papers in any detail, but just glancing at them, they look like terribly small studies, looking at specific populations (or even pigs) and looking at a wide range of outcomes (given enough outcomes, you'll be able to find something that's statistically significant). I don't know if there's any other evidence, but this isn't nearly enough.
    there are a whole bunch of articles that I don't have access to on google scholar just search "paleolithic nutrition" if you are interested.
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  8. #7  
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    A meta-analysis would be valuable.
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    This paragraph from the first article seems to be the basic premise of the paleolithic diet.

    As the 10 000 or so years since the beginning of the agriculture and animal domestication began,that is less than 1% of Homo evolutionary timeŚleaves little time for evolutionary forces to redesign the core metabolic and physiological processes in a major way in response to the major dietary changes introduced by
    the agricultural revolution and food animal domestication.
    I do not find this argument particularly convincing. The amount of evolutionary time is not so important if there is significant evolutionary pressure. We can see that some of the domesticated species have changed drastically from their wild ancestors. Maize barely resembles its ancestor, teosinte. Many domestic animals would have no chance of survival in the wild. So there was plenty of time for evolutionary changes to happen and humans were evolving right alongside their domestic species.

    More significant, I think, are the more recent changes, like sedentary lifestyle and greater processing of food, which we really haven't had enough time to adapt to.
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  10. #9  
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    I've never seen a caveman, fat or otherwise.
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