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Thread: Expired Chocolate Bars

  1. #1 Expired Chocolate Bars 
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    A month ago, i found a huge stash of chocolate ...2 cartons full. However, all the chocolate had expired by April 2004. 2 years gone by. i was wondering what would happen if i ate them now? Pls do not suggest that i throw them away as i'm posting this from a place where chocolate is so prrrecious!!!
    tia
    Dan.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Isotope (In)Sanity's Avatar
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    What will happen, nothing. It just won't taste as good. Eat to much of it fresh or old and you'll get sick. The old stuff starts to taste a bit dried out and the texture gets a bit off.

    Just eat some and you'll see.


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  4. #3  
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    i once ate a chocolate a year old and it had these tiny aphid-like bugs in them! unfortunatelty i only discovered it halfway through! sis!
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  5. #4  
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    Provided the chocolate is 'sealed' and when opened looks 'ok' (it does not matter if it has lost it's 'gloss' it can be eaten). Chocolate will keep for up to ten years - more in the right conditions, the sell by date or best before labels do not mean "Poisoness after" !!

    I have eaten chocolate up to 3 years old and I'm still perfectly Aaaaarrgghh...
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  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman Bonzo's Avatar
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    YES, candy can go bad/expired. Any food can go bad, no matter the amount of preservatives.

    Hard candies can absorb moisture from the air and when moist, sugar is an excellent food for mold spores.

    Chocolate Bars containing any fruit or nut products can also go bad. Nuts can grow mold, turn rancid or hatch "things" if left too long. Plain chocolate has a long shelf life, but can be 'hit by heat' and end up looking like it's all grey and or splotchey. This is not mold, but just the cocoa butter fat rising to the surface.
    - Yahoo Answers

    Therefore, ugh yeah.. and it'll be stale making it hard to chew.. Chhheeew.. CHEWWW!
    Representing the Pigloo Tribe ^^
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  7. #6  
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    Hence the right conditions. If the chocolate is sealed properly, in a dry area, no mold grows, etc, it should be edible. granted, I've never exactly eaten anything past the expiration date since the last time my grandmother ("intelligent" as she is) made some food with three year old canned chicken.

    Yes, old ladies all believe that because it's canned it doesn't "expire".
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  8. #7  
    Forum Freshman Falloutboysgirl's Avatar
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    ew throw it away
    blahblahblahablahblahblahablah blahablah
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  9. #8  
    墨子 DaBOB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falloutboysgirl
    ew throw it away
    I agree!!!
    Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you'll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself. -Spoon Boy
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  10. #9  
    Moderator Moderator John Galt's Avatar
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    My general view is that not eating chocolate when the opportunity presents itself should be the only behaviour that is subject to capital punishment.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    My general view is that not eating chocolate when the opportunity presents itself should be the only behaviour that is subject to capital punishment.
    I wholeheartedly agree.
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  12. #11  
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    im eating one right now....creamy hazelnut hmmmm good....eat the damn things, who cares what age they are, the older the berry the sweeter the juice :wink:
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNeedles
    im eating one right now....creamy hazelnut hmmmm good....eat the damn things, who cares what age they are, the older the berry the sweeter the juice :wink:
    B'stard! :-D
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  14. #13  
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    B'stard!

    lol, want one??? hmm?? what is it with chocolate?? who here does NOT like chocolate??
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  15. #14 Re: Expired Chocolate Bars 
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    Was trying to c if i shld eat my individually wraped boxed milk chocolate 2 yrs past best n y'll confusing. So chocolate here we go!
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  16. #15  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
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    Chocolates past their use by date absolutely must be disposed of.

    Tell you what. Just send them to me and I will make sure they are eaten - whoops, I mean destroyed.
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  17. #16  
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    If you are worried about eating the chocolate try using it in cooking. But really, most heavily processed foods are pretty resistent to spoilage, particularly if they are kept sealed. "Sell by" dates are mostly for the benifit of regulators.
    It varies a lot depending on the type of food we are talking about. Pasturized milk needs to be kept refridgerated because even after pasturization there is still a significant bacterial load. Sterilized milk in a sealed can will keep pretty much as long as the can is still intact.
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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    If you are worried about eating the chocolate try using it in cooking. But really, most heavily processed foods are pretty resistent to spoilage, particularly if they are kept sealed. "Sell by" dates are mostly for the benifit of regulators.
    It varies a lot depending on the type of food we are talking about. Pasturized milk needs to be kept refridgerated because even after pasturization there is still a significant bacterial load. Sterilized milk in a sealed can will keep pretty much as long as the can is still intact.
    If you look carefully, at least here in the US, it says "Best if Used By", not "After this date it will make you sick". There can be some degradation in quality after that date, but common sense and basic knowledge will tell you want is likely to truly spoil quickly after that. Chocolate does not respond well to temperature extremes; too hot or too cold. If kept at the mythical "room temperature" there should be no issue for quite a while (months at least, and probably a year) afterward.
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  19. #18 Thx 
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    Merci!!
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  20. #19  
    Northern Horse Whisperer scheherazade's Avatar
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    An old thread but a 'timeless' question, there being chocolate involved.

    I recently discovered several 400G bars of good quality dark chocolate that I had purchased in error as I prefer milk chocolate and so they had gotten set by in my pantry, which is cool and dark. Having since cultivated a taste for dark chocolate because it is considered to be a 'healthier' option, I investigated their state because they were 4 years past their 'best before' date.

    They were well sealed and smelled good, no separation of the cocoa butter had occurred and so I have been ingesting them without ill effect.

    Chocolate bars with milk, corn syrup and a host of other ingredients I do not think would have fared as well and I would likely not have eaten them under the same conditions.

    Once, also, I found some milk chocolate in my 'survival kit' ( I do a lot of outdoor activities etc.) and although it was probably less than a year old, there were some 'crawlies' in it, even though it was in a sealed Ziploc hard plastic container. Grossed me out for a fact and I didn't even contemplate salvaging the container.
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  21. #20  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    Chocolate usually gets grounded down, boiled etc. But sometimes eggs can remain in the butter/cocoa powder. If the whole chocolate doesn't reach temperatures above 60 degrees celcius it is probably infested with bacteria and artropods eggs. It'll be the yeast and the fungi who will predigest the chocolate, until it's fair enough for the artropods to hatch. Chocolate also draws water, so the artropods will have plenty to eat/drink. I think the milk chocolate doesn reach temperatures above 60, so it'll be this way. Normal chocolate gets much hotter, because there is no milk that can float atop of it, so it simply stays exactly the same.

    Though, creepy crawlies are edible, earworms, without their pincirs, the mealworm is pretty tasty, etc. If you want an actual survival pack, i'd pack dried out fruit candy, raisins, rice, pure chocolate, powdered milk, powdered chocolate, and chlorine tablets, to purify water (radio and batteries also optional).. Pasta can replace rice, but i prefer rice ..

    Not sure why i responded to this actually, maybe it's helpfull .
    The past teaches, the present watches and the future learns.

    Though religion is a concept that simply can not be ignored. The fact that a deity could stand idly by when one part of his creation slaughters another part, simply for his namesake, is a mystery i doubt theologist would dare touch.

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    Northern Horse Whisperer scheherazade's Avatar
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    Interesting information about the temperature that different chocolate is processed at, Zwolver. That rather answers the 'crawlies' question. Living in a remote region, there are plenty of dried staples in my pantry and I always have a few fresh and durable snacks with me as one never knows when one might encounter delay. The trick is to remember to keep them all in rotation so that nothing gets TOO old.

    I had a friend who had 13 year old flour in his cupboard and didn't realize that flour can actually 'spoil'. I made him a small bannock to demonstrate the change it the taste of the flour and even though he loved bannock, he could not eat it. He rotated his whole pantry then and found a package of Mac & Cheese that had worms in the dehydrated cheese package, lol...

    On the bright side, no chocolate went to waste because such was not to his taste.
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  23. #22  
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    Save the Chocolate!
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  24. #23  
    Forum Freshman efbjr's Avatar
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    From:

    Is Expired Chocolate Edible? | LIVESTRONG.COM

    Is Expired Chocolate Edible? Aug 14, 2011

    By: Fred Decker
    If you are in the habit of maintaining an emergency stockpile of chocolate for stressful days, you may occasionally find that some of your supply has become outdated. This raises the obvious question of whether you can still eat the chocolate, especially if it's all you have left and you really, really need some.

    Chocolate Basics

    Pure chocolate is not a single substance, but a mixture of them. Its chemistry is complex and not entirely understood, but in simple terms chocolate is made up of two things. The first is its flavor ingredients, the cocoa solids. These make chocolate taste the way it does, and contain the active ingredients that make it so pleasurable for our brains. The second is cocoa butter, a collection of fats that give the chocolate its rich mouth feel and physical form. Chocolate sold for eating adds at least a small amount of sweetening, and may include many other ingredients as well.

    Edibility

    Fortunately for absent-minded chocolate lovers, it's not a very perishable food. Pure chocolate contains little moisture, a necessity for bacterial life. This, and its high fat content, give chocolate a lengthy shelf life if it's kept in a cool, dry place. Of course, this only considers edibility. Although it seldom becomes dangerous to eat, chocolate's flavor and texture will eventually deteriorate. Also, the possibility of your chocolate absorbing off flavors from its surroundings increases with the passage of time.

    Deterioration of Pure Chocolate

    The most visible symptom of aging chocolate is the appearance of a dull off-white, powdery-looking substance on its surface. Often it's mistaken for mold, and the chocolate is discarded. If fact, the powder is nothing more than crystals of cocoa butter rising to the surface. The chocolate remains edible, though the texture becomes crumbly. In the case of pure chocolate, it can easily be melted and reused. Over long periods, especially in warm climates, the cocoa butter itself can eventually oxidize and become rancid. There is no remedy for that, and the chocolate should be discarded.

    Chocolate Confections

    Candy bars and other confections made from chocolate don't necessarily age in the same way that pure chocolate does. Manufacturers often replace cocoa butter with cheaper fats, which may oxidize more quickly. Ingredients including nuts, dried fruit, dairy products and peanut butter are all prone to spoilage, rancidity and off flavors. In some cases, the chocolate is adulterated enough to allow the growth of mold. Any visible mold means the chocolate should be discarded. Aside from that, the issue is more one of flavor than edibility.

    References

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  25. #24  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    This is much more comprehensive as what i said. I'm not a chocolatologist, .. or something like that, but the guy who wrote that sure knows Côte'dOr from actual fine grade chocolate. Hmm, tasty..
    The past teaches, the present watches and the future learns.

    Though religion is a concept that simply can not be ignored. The fact that a deity could stand idly by when one part of his creation slaughters another part, simply for his namesake, is a mystery i doubt theologist would dare touch.

    ~Zwolver...
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  26. #25  
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    What a waste of chocolates if you don't eat that. lol by the way it's better not to eat those expired chocolates because you do not know what will be the effect just for rest assure.It's just for your own good. I haven't eat food that was expired already but if i knew already that food was expired i won't eat.
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  27. #26  
    Northern Horse Whisperer scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by internal medicine View Post
    What a waste of chocolates if you don't eat that. lol by the way it's better not to eat those expired chocolates because you do not know what will be the effect just for rest assure.It's just for your own good. I haven't eat food that was expired already but if i knew already that food was expired i won't eat.
    The 'best before date' means just that.

    'Best Before'.

    The food does not 'expire' immediately once that date is reached although it is of more concern in the case of fresh products such as meat, dairy and vegetables. In the case of chocolate and some other products of historically long shelf life, I personally suspect it to be an industry technique to flog more product, lol, from my experience of 8 years in the retail food business. You will even find best before dates on honey now. In the case of confections, which are made of other ingredients besides chocolate, the loss of quality or staleness will become apparent far sooner as the nougat and caramel centers become quite brittle over time and pose a hazard to one's teeth. I would toss any confections that demonstrated signs of staleness but I would not be so quick to dispose of plain chocolate for if it is stored in a cool, dark location it remains stable and quite edible considerably past that arbitrary 'best before' date.
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