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Thread: Coma patients

  1. #1 Coma patients 
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    Obviously coma patients follow the normal diurnal pattern, which is why when (if) they awaken they can remember actual incidents when they were coma-awake and only nonsense (dreams) when they were coma-asleep.
    It therefore occurs to me to ask if anyone has attempted hypnosis on a coma-awake patient in order to establish communication with the patient that otherwise appears impossible.
    Does anyone have information on this subject?

    Regards,
    Mike.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
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    I suspect that what lies behind this question is a excessively optimistic belief in what hyphosis can do. Hypnosis is sometimes useful, but it is mostly just a means of making a person more suggestible. It is not capable of the myriad miracle workings that popular mythology ascribes to it.

    It also requires the comlete cooperation of the person being hynotised.

    For these reasons, I seriously doubt whether it would have the slightest impact on a coma patient, whether in his/her waking or sleeping cycle.


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  4. #3 Coma patients 
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    Fair comment, I am not conversant with hypnosis procedures, just seemed to remember somewhere that the full co-operation of the subject was not always essential.
    if the subject is coma-awake and therefore possibly aware of their surroundings, would hypnotic suggestion be totally impossible?

    Regards,
    Mike.
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  5. #4  
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    There's a well-studied phenomenon in psychology known as "priming" which is similar to what you're thinking, and you can predispose people (or suggest) toward certain outcomes, but hypnosis is sort of crap.


    This page seems to give a pretty solid overview:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Priming_%28psychology%29
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  6. #5  
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    hello guys ...



    its really nice and informative post....



    i just liked it....



    thanks for your information guys ...........
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  7. #6  
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    The science of Acupuncture is a subject dealing with the prevention and treatment of diseases. It is done by needling, moxibustion, hands and finger acupressure. For many of years it has been accepted by the general population for its good curative effect.
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  8. #7 Interesting idea 
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    Interesting idea and worth a try, but I doubt it would work.

    First of all, hypnosis definitely requires the full cooperation of the patient. While hypnosis is a valuable technique, especially for patients that have anxiety problems, real hypnosis is not like movie hypnosis. It is just a deep state of relaxation, which can also make the patient more suggestible.

    If a person has repressed a traumatic memory, hypnosis can sometimes be helpful in recovering that memory, because it relaxes the person.

    However, in the case of coma patients, their memory loss is not caused by trauma or anxiety. It is caused by actual brain damage. The neurons that encode new memories have often been destroyed, rendering the person incapable of forming new memories.

    So I doubt hypnosis would help such a person.

    Nonetheless, if I had a comatose patient in my family, I would give it a try, because, heck, it couldn't hurt!
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  9. #8  
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    The only hypnosis I have witnessed was for entertainment purposes. The hypnotist hypnotized some audience members and made them do silly things. It's funny but the idea of hypnotizing is that the hypnotist is suggesting or pushing a person to do or say something. The same can be said for therapy sessions using hypnosis. A victim won't automatically start talking about a traumatic incident without first being guided or persuaded by the hypnotist to do so. With that being said, I don't think this is possible with a coma patient.
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  10. #9 RE:Coma 
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    Hi,
    Coma is a state of profound unconsciousness in which the patient is incapable of conscious behavior. It can be said that coma is a state wherein there is very little brain activity, and the patient hovers between life and death. You can also get more information through online pharmacy they have adequate stuff about comma .

    Online pharmacy
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  11. #10  
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    In her 30 years of nursing, Nancy Valko brought so many patients out of comas that other nurses started asking if she was a witch.

    But Valko, president of Missouri Nurses for Life and spokeswoman for the National Association of Pro-Life Nurses, said that her methods were simple: talking to the patients, playing their favorite music, making simple requests.

    Valko recounted, "I used to get teased for talking to comatose patients. I was even asked if I talked to my refrigerator."

    But her talk got results: One day, a 17-year-old boy came to the hospital in a deep coma. The neurosurgeon on duty said, "He won't live until morning and it's a good thing, because he'd be a vegetable."

    The boy lived, and soon he could even move at the nurses' request -- but he would never respond when the neurosurgeon was present.

    Eventually he was released, and Valko never expected to see him again. But one day a handsome young man walked into the ward and said, "Do you remember me?"

    The 17-year-old had come back to thank them for saving his life. When Valko mentioned the neurosurgeon, she recalled, "He got very serious." The boy said, "I remember him calling me a vegetable. I wouldn't move for him."

    Valko‚s experience is not unique. Dr. Mihai Dimancescu, a Long Island neurosurgeon who has worked with many patients in comas, noted a growing "recognition that people who have some kind of a brain injury, even if they're in a coma for several weeks, do have the potential for recovery. A lot of hospitals are more aggressive in the early days of treatment, particularly the university hospitals and some of the larger community hospitals."

    Although Dimancescu stressed that no technique was at all certain, he explained that new knowledge of the brain has shown that "new connections can be made between brain cells where connections have been lost. Parts of the brain can take over the function of other parts that have been lost."

    And the techniques are improving constantly. Paulette Demato, program coordinator for the New York-based Coma Recovery Association, said that a flu medication called amantadine has had a few successes. One woman in New Mexico was given amantadine as a routine flu treatment and awoke from a 16-year-long coma, Demato said

    http://www.hispacar.com/car-hire/barcelona/
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