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Thread: Cancer Tumor is Wraped Around my Dads Heart

  1. #1 Cancer Tumor is Wraped Around my Dads Heart 
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    2 weeks ago my dad was told he has lung cancer. the cancerous tumor was wrapped around his heart. they have started him on Chemo and radiation in hopes to shrink the tumor so they can do surgery and remove it. So far the cancer has not spread anywhere else, thank god. I have been so upset after finding out about his cancer and so is the rest of the family. My dad said He doesn't feel like he's going to die but live. all of us believe him,but we are still very scared. the doctor's have said if the chemo and radiation dosen't shrink ot that there is nothing more they will be able to do for him. anyone out there with some tip's or suggestion's???


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  3. #2  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
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    Remember that the one thing which all life has in common is death... We all die, and there is no way around it. While it's sometimes hard for relatives and friends to deal with the absence of the person they love, their desire to prevent the loved one from dying is somewhat selfish (very natural, and very okay, but still selfish).

    The thoughts should be on the person they love, and... if they are ultimately going to suffer... then sometimes death is the most reasonable and caring outcome. Yes... It hurts emotionally those who out-survive him, but IMO it would nearly always be better to just pass away than to spend countless of years in agony and suffering only to die later anyway.

    Don't get me wrong. Medical technology is great, and I hope that your father manages to heal and live several more years as a healthy happy man. That is definitely possible, but so too is him passing away so be sure to prepare yourself for both and maximize the time you share together now since the outcome is still unknown.

    Take care.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
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    I suggest you take care. There are plenty of people out there who will claim they can fix your Dad. They cannot.

    The only ones who have a chance to heal your father are the highly qualified oncologists he is already seeing. If you do not like their ideas, then feel free to see other cancer specialists. However, do not get distracted by all the con artists and fraudsters who claim to be able to help. They will just take your money, and give nothing back.

    And as iNow said, try to cultivate some serenity. What you are going through is a terrible thing, and you deserve our sympathy. It is up to you and your family to find a way to come to terms with the outcome, whether it is a healing or not.
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  5. #4  
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    That is always hard news to accept. However, that surgery is still being considered is probably a positive sign, meaning the cancer hasn’t spread sufficiently for it to be inoperable.

    And try to ignore mortality statistics. On their own, these figures don't mean much. They have to be looked at alongside incidence figures and other statistics, and on their own may be misleading—for example, they do not take account of stage, grade or any specific sub type of lung cancer (small cell lung cancer, or non small lung cancer). In addition, patients may have died after harbouring the disease for long periods of time, or experienced a recurrence of the cancer.

    The stage and progress of the cancer is an important factor when determining survival statistics. Diagnosis of the cancer in its early stage (stage 1) significantly improves chances of survival. Survival statistics fall with more advanced stages (from 1-4). That said, no statistics can tell you what will happen to anyone. An individual’s cancer is unique—the same type of cancer can grow at different rates in different people for example.

    Finally, a number of clinical trials are taking place in the UK. You might want to look at the website below:

    http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/trials/index.htm
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