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Thread: tips to remain healthy

  1. #1 tips to remain healthy 
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    Hi,
    here are some tips to remain healthy.Try it you will feel fine.
    1.Drink plenty of water or other calorie-free beverages.
    2.Think about what you can add to your diet, not what you should take away.
    3.Consider whether you're really hungry.
    4.Be choosy about night time snacks.
    5.Eat several mini-meals during the day.
    6.Eat protein at every meal.


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  3. #2 Re: tips to remain healthy 
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaily
    1.Drink plenty of water or other calorie-free beverages.
    Okay. I've followed step number one, but something is wrong. I seem to be suffering from an imbalance of electrolytes, and it seems that this water intoxication has developed in me a cardiac arrhythmia. What shall I do?


    Quote Originally Posted by shaily
    2.Think about what you can add to your diet, not what you should take away.
    Okay. I've thought about adding more bacon, and a lot of butter. I've decided not to take away my daily jug of country gravy which I like to sip on while at my desk. What next?


    Quote Originally Posted by shaily
    3.Consider whether you're really hungry.
    I've decided that I am. Although, I didn't really need to think about it... It just sort of happened. It seemed that my glucose level was low and my stomach had contracted, and my lateral hypothalamus is more active than my ventromedial nuclei. Is that normal?


    Quote Originally Posted by shaily
    4.Be choosy about night time snacks.
    Oh... I am. I go for the bucket of chicken. I'm trying to cut back, though. I'm down to a 10-piece... But, I AM choosy. I used to eat Church's chicken. Now, I only eat the best... KFC. It's done wonders for me.


    Quote Originally Posted by shaily
    5.Eat several mini-meals during the day.
    "Mini" relative to whom/what? My several mini-meals during the day are mini relative to an elephant. Is that good?


    Quote Originally Posted by shaily
    6.Eat protein at every meal.
    Who's that? I don't know anyone named "Protein," but she sounds kinda sexy... I'll see if my health will be improved by becoming a cunning linguist... as per your suggestion.



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  4. #3  
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    shaily

    iNow, of course, was being sarcastic. But he had cause. Your set of tips for remaining healthy are vague and even unscientific.

    For example : tip number one has no scientific backing. There is no proper empirical evidence to suggest that drinking excess water is of any benefit. Excess is defined as more than you need to quench your thirst.

    A better set of tips for being healthy might be along the lines of :

    1. Eat a balanced diet.
    2. Get regular exercise
    3. Get proper rest and relaxation
    4. Manage your stress levels
    5. No smoking
    6. Carefully manage your consumption of alcohol to one or two drinks a day
    7. Good social life
    8. Good relationship with your sexual partner
    etc., etc.
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  5. #4  
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    skeptic,

    Try not to forget the spam link which previously appeared in their signature. :wink:
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  6. #5 Tips.. 
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    The other tips that you post is not good... Not all tips... ^^
    Skeptic post is good enough than your tips...
    But whatever your tips are, you should always
    take a healthy foods for a good health...
    Sleep can help too.. Sleep at the right time.. ^^
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    6. Carefully manage your consumption of alcohol to one or two drinks a day

    how about one or two a WEEK?
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    Quote Originally Posted by lemmycool
    6. Carefully manage your consumption of alcohol to one or two drinks a day

    how about one or two a WEEK?
    I think it be fine other than to much of drinking alcohol. Anyway, drinking water has truly have numerous healthy benefits is our body which i highly suggested to drink water everyday for at least six glass of water specially during this summer.
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    yeah, but doesn`t too much water take out the salts and minerals alongside.
    I mean if you drink really much, you piss out all the minerals and stuff
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  10. #9  
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    It is easily possible to drink too much water.
    http://chemistry.about.com/cs/5/f/blwaterintox.htm

    Even the idea of drinking 6 to 8 glasses of water per day is simply wrong - an urban myth.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0809071640.htm

    Drink what you need when thirsty. Any extra will do more harm than good.
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    well, actually when you feel thirsty then it means it is too late. your body is in need of extra liquid.
    drink enough so you don`t feel thirst
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    Quote Originally Posted by lemmycool
    well, actually when you feel thirsty then it means it is too late. your body is in need of extra liquid.
    drink enough so you don`t feel thirst
    This is from the second link that skeptic posted above:

    Other claims discredited by scientific evidence that Valtin discusses include:
    Thirst Is Too Late. It is often stated that by the time people are thirsty, they are already dehydrated. On the contrary, thirst begins when the concentration of blood (an accurate indicator of our state of hydration) has risen by less than two percent, whereas most experts would define dehydration as beginning when that concentration has risen by at least five percent.
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    that is a matter of agreeing on the level of when dehydration starts then
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    Common sense tells us that the amount of water we need is highly variable. More in summer or when exercising. Less when the weather is cool or when you are doing your 'couch potato' thing.

    Minor thirst is a perfectly good and adequate signal. Drink at need, and only what you need. Forcing yourself to drink more than that is silly and can be damaging.

    And, of course, avoid sugary and carbonated drinks like the plague. They have so much sugar in them that they are health death traps. I even water down fruit juices when I drink them (orange and mango juice - yum!) to avoid consuming too much sugar.

    I have also trained my taste buds so I can drink tea and coffee without sugar with real pleasure. Moderate amounts of cafeine are pretty harmless, and low fat milk is a boon to good health (calcium and protein), but excess sugar is one of the great things to avoid, along with excess saturated fat and excess salt.
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    yeah, i have trained my buds also..... that sounds wrong

    but instead of 3 teaspoons of sugar, i`m dow to just one small one
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    I follow every word U say...
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    Thanks for sharing this precious information with us..Some tips from my side are:

    -Increase the Intake of Fruits and Vegetables.
    -Avoid all Foods cooked from the Microwave.
    -Avoid Oily and Salty Foods
    -Avoid ALL Land Animal Protein. ( those from water- like fish, prawn, crab, and so on is OK )
    -Avoid the following combinations when preparing or consuming food,
    OIL + HEAT + STARCH ( to prevent the LIVER from producing unnatural cholesterol )
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    Some criticisms of regueradela's post.

    OK< eating a lot of fruit and vegetables is always good.

    However, the advice to avoid microwaved food is silly dogma.

    Microwave cooked food is probably healthier than food cooked using more traditional ways.

    Oily and salty foods? Fish and vegetable oils are actually very healthy. However, too much oil is fattening. Too much salt, I agree, is bad.

    Land animal protein is absolutely fine, as long as it is eaten in moderation, and fat is removed. In fact, red meat is the best source for iron and vitamin B12 - to the extent that people who avoid eating red meat often suffer from both iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency syndrome.

    Oil, heat and starch are also fine, if kept in moderation. Too much oil is fattening. And overcooked oil can produce transfats, which are not good. But this is easily avoided. Simply do not overheat the oil, and do not re-use cooking oil.

    Starch foods should be of a type that is high in fibre, such as wholemeal and multigrain breads, or root vegetables. Wholemeal pasta or brown rice are also fine. As long as this rule is followed, eating lots of starch is fine for normal people.
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    How about weight-training? I jog for 35 minutes 3-4 times a week and stretch thoroughly afterwards, but my "weight-training" is limited to 3 sets of push-ups before I jog.

    Is this lack of weight-training a problem?
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  20. #19  
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    Russell

    The first rule of healthy exercise is simple : Just do it!

    The exact type of exercise done is very much secondary to the importance of doing exercise. There are lots of people who do no formal exercise other than a long walk every day. Those people will be much healthier than couch potatoes, and their long walk will yield great health benefits.

    However, there are also a lot of people who want to totally maximise their health benefits from exercise. If that is you, then the rule is the same as for good diet. Variety, variety, variety.

    Get lots of exercise from as many different forms as possible. That will include exercise related to stretching and flexibility - exercise for aerobic fitness such as fast walking, jogging etc - and some pumping iron. In my own personal regimen, I also include specialised exercises to strengthen my back and neck muscles, to improve hand/eye coordination, and to improve my sense of balance.

    That said, let me emphasize that the most important factor is simply to do good exercise regularly, and not get too hung up on what type.

    From what you said, it appears you are already doing that. My advice, FWIW, is not to worry about other exercises. Keep up what you are doing. It looks good to me.
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    Hi,
    I want to tell about Yoga.yoga exercises always seem, well, easy. However, once you try it, you'll realize it's more challenging than running 3-4 miles. Yoga benefits every functioning part of the body and you'll soon see the yoga exercises are far from easy.Yoga exercises will also improve your concentration and focus. Many people report they are more productive at work and at home for the rest of the day after a session of yoga exercises. For more information visit this site URL: http://www.sivanandabahamas.org/yoga...r-training.htm
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  22. #21  
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    Yoga 'exercises' or rather postures can take hours to do, for only marginal benefit, and they can do more harm than good eg. cricked back and other injuries and they can adversely affect your immune system.
    Try these:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Tibetan_Rites
    They take only 5-10 minutes a day to do and are the most dynamic exercises I know. Do the 5 x 21 in under 10 minutes if you can (preferably in 6 minutes). They are good for mind and body.
    If there is a slight criticism I suspect they are most effective in a good climate of clean fresh air like that found at altitude, such as the Himalayas where 'Colonel Bradford' discovered them and brought them to the attention of the world.
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  23. #22  
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    Let me once more emphasize.

    There is no such thing as a 'magic' exercise regiment. Five magic Tibetan rites or yoga magic is, of course, total bullcrap. Not that there is anything wrong with those exercises. If that is what blows your hair back, then fine.

    The important thing is simply to do exercise. Variety it the key to excellent exercise, but simple walking, jogging, etc is perfectly OK.

    If you are one of those zealots who absolutely have to do 'perfect' exercises, then join a gym, hire a trainer, and perform that range of excercises recommended by the professional. Get your fitness retested every month and get the trainer to update your exercises accordingly. This will make you as fit overall as it is possible to be.

    However, you can get 80% of the benefit (in terms of heart, lung and overall health) by simply doing 30 minutes per day of almost anything that gets your breathing and heart rate up. A young mother, playing with, and lifting babies or children probably needs no extra exercise. Ditto for people in manual work. If your life is sedentary, then get out and do something to lift the old heart rate, even if it is just digging the garden.

    Unless you are especially neurotic about it, forget the 'perfect' exercise regimen. You do not really need it.
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  24. #23  
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic
    The important thing is simply to do exercise. Variety it the key to excellent exercise, but simple walking, jogging, etc is perfectly OK.
    In reality, not many people walk or jog unless they have to or they are participating in the current health craze. I challenge that walking and jogging are 'perfectly OK' as many people have collapsed and died with undue strain, although I haven't come across this fate with cyclists yet.
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic
    If you are one of those zealots who absolutely have to do 'perfect' exercises, then join a gym, hire a trainer, and perform that range of excercises recommended by the professional. Get your fitness retested every month and get the trainer to update your exercises accordingly. This will make you as fit overall as it is possible to be.
    Yes, and the people who have private trainers always drive to the gym, rather than walk or cycle. A complete waste of money. It is just a fitness craze participated in by the middle classes, and so are yoga classes for that matter.
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic
    However, you can get 80% of the benefit (in terms of heart, lung and overall health) by simply doing 30 minutes per day of almost anything that gets your breathing and heart rate up.
    This is precisely what the Tibetan Rites do in under 10 minutes a day, leaving you free from worry, and with some amazing added advantages, eg supple body, weight regulation, improved eyesight even. There is no catch. There is no money to pay (this discourages some I know, who believe that the more you pay the better it must be). All you need is a small space inside or out, and a quantum of determination. Go for it!
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  25. #24  
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    To ox

    Yes, people have dropped dead while walking, jogging etc. People have also dropped dead while sitting on their couch watching TV. Walking, jogging, swimming, or other simple exercise still, on average, makes people live longer, and (more importantly) live fuller lives.

    Gyms as fitness crazes? Fine. I care not. It works. If it is just a craze, long may it continue.

    Tibetan rites. Sorry guy. I am quite happy to accept these as good exercise, along with 10,000 other ways. However, as magic, they represent bullcrap. Anything touted as magic is bullcrap. Good results in 10 minutes? In fact, researchers have determined that the minimum exercise required for good health is 150 minutes per week. Tibetan rites do not excuse you from this requirement.

    Tibetan rites can be a part of this 150 minutes. But the full time is needed, and can be made up with other exercises, whether formal, like a gym, or informal, like digging the garden.
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  26. #25  
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic
    Tibetan rites. Sorry guy. I am quite happy to accept these as good exercise, along with 10,000 other ways. However, as magic, they represent bullcrap. Anything touted as magic is bullcrap. Good results in 10 minutes? In fact, researchers have determined that the minimum exercise required for good health is 150 minutes per week. Tibetan rites do not excuse you from this requirement.
    I see that your use of a word to describe the the Rites has mellowed from 'total bullcrap' to just plain 'bullcrap'. I would use the word 'amazing'. So maybe I'm getting through to you that expensive gyms are just there to take your money. The gym workout is simply a modern money making racket, as is some celeb's workout dvd. None of these has any lasting effect on people's health, as witnessed by the rising levels of obesity in western society. I recently saw a picture of the Governor of California's upper body, and it looked a bit terminated to me. Proof that bodybuilding doesn't work for long. I did not say the Rites were 'magic', nor did I ever think of them as such. They are 5 easy exercises done in a special way to provide maximum benefit. It is not important that they only take under 10 minutes to do. The problem in the modern world is that people are put off having to do hours of exercise a week when there is so much demand on their mostly sedentary lives. I have been doing them now for over 3 years. My eyesight has improved. My troublesome eczema has virtually disappeared, but if I leave them off for a while I notice it creeps back. I don't feel drowsy in the afternoon any more. They could even help with depression.
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  27. #26  
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    ox

    If you are exercising regularly, congratulations.

    All exercise is good, as I have been at pains to say.
    Tibetan rites are also, no doubt, good. The thing is, though, that there are no easy shortcuts. For optimising good health, we need a minimum of 150 minutes per week solid exercise. Substituting 10 minutes per day will not do it. Still better than nothing, but not good enough.

    On gyms. These give good results when used regularly. Sure, if you stop exercising, all those hours in the gym will, in the end, prove useless. Exercise is a life long commitment. Start when young doing 150 plus hours per week, and keep it up till you are so old that you cannot. And even then, do what little you can.

    Expensive gyms are there to take your money? Absolutely. Why else would anyone bother build a gym and buy all the equipment. I wish I, too, owned an expensive gym and had all that cash flowing in. But so what? Supermarkets are there also to make money. Yet we all need them to buy food.
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  28. #27  
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic
    On gyms. These give good results when used regularly. Sure, if you stop exercising, all those hours in the gym will, in the end, prove useless. Exercise is a life long commitment. Start when young doing 150 plus hours per week, and keep it up till you are so old that you cannot. And even then, do what little you can.
    As there are only 168 hours a week, might I suggest that you will be finished well before old age.
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic
    Expensive gyms are there to take your money? Absolutely. Why else would anyone bother build a gym and buy all the equipment. I wish I, too, owned an expensive gym and had all that cash flowing in. But so what? Supermarkets are there also to make money. Yet we all need them to buy food.
    I don't mind the supermarket having me for life. They are wonderful, if wasteful organisations. Gyms on the other hand are only too prepared to scare people into thinking that theirs is the only solution. In my limited experience of using them in the past I would say that they are little more than tribal, attracting the health-crazed in the same way as sports stadia attract the thrill junky. Who does anyone think they are other than an ape that has climbed down from the trees and lost its hair? All our activities echo our ancient roots, but somehow we are brainwashed into believing that the more expensive something is the better it must be.
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    In fact, researchers have determined that the minimum exercise required for good health is 150 minutes per week.
    Skeptic, do you have the reference for this research?

    Forcing yourself to drink more than that is silly and can be damaging.
    Do you also have evidence to back this one up? While i agree forcing yourself to drink is pointless, it seems unlikely you'd actually damage your health, as long as your kidneys work adequately and you're not running a marathon.
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    ox

    My mistake. I meant, of course, 150 minutes per week. Please consider my hand slapped.

    On gyms and supermarkets. Both are into advertising and customer loyalty, and generating false images. It is called doing business.

    Prometheus

    On 150 minutes per week and on drinking heaps of water, there is a lot of reports out there - easy to find on the internet. Here are a couple.

    http://www.wellsphere.com/exercise-a...tay-fit/456747

    http://dms.dartmouth.edu/news/2002_h...02_water.shtml
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    Thanks Skepitc, i'll have a look at the literature more closely when i get time.

    For now i just want to clarify one point. The link to Dartmouth Medical School has a literature review. This review states that it could not find many original articles using traditional database searches (quite possible). He then explains how he sought expert opinion instead (absolutely fine). He then states he sought the opinions of nutritionists (say what????).

    In the UK a nutritionist is akin to a homoeopath. Unaccredited freelancers with no academic base. A dietician is a qualified professional with significant contributions to the medical evidence base.

    My question then is a nutritionist the same thing in the USA as it is in the UK? Or by nutritionist did the author actually mean what i understand as dieticians?
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    Feeling thirsty should not be rellied on to decide when to drink and when not to drink.


    For example when you are very thirsty, evolution has for some reason decided that it's probably best for you to binge drink. This however is not the case. It's good to sip your water in small amounts throughout the day. A large drink does nothing but waste space in your body, and carry away resources when it leaves.

    So sip your drink slowly.

    Also, if you are very thirsty. I've heard, but have not confirmed, that swishing water around in your mouth helps to hydrate yourself as well. So sip some, swish some, and in theory, hydrate yourself from multiple fronts. Swishing is also a good tactic for slowing down your drinking.

    Water also flushes out vitamins C and all but 1 of the Bs


    There is also nothing wrong with other drinks, even ones high in sugar. Alcohol is not inherently bad either, it is very useful actually as a source of calories. There are certain amounts and durations spent in various organs that cause problems in very specific circumstances. We might not understand it all completely, but that's not an excuse to say 'drinking alcohol is bad' because we know enough to conclude that this isn't true.
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    Marcus

    I have not suggested that you should wait till you are very thirsty before drinking. However, carrying a bottle of expensive water with you, and sucking on it, all the time, is just plain ridiculous. Most seasons, in a temperate climate you only need to drink 3 to 4 times a day to satisfy normal thirst.

    Drinking too much water can, on rare occasions, be harmful, even causing death in some situations.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication
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    So nutritionist is not protected term in most states. To be honest though, i can't be bothered to do the necessary leg work to check all the literature properly, maybe later.

    I would say, though, that given far more people die from dehydration than water toxicity (based on my own observations working in A&E/ER) that the advice for 8 glasses a day isn't damaging. Particulary it is pertinent to the elderly population, who have diminshed thirst sensation (maybe due to aged baroreceptors, or higher baseline plasma osmolarity).

    Like the 5 fruit and veg a day in the UK, these recomendations are a composite of expert opinion and government agencies deciding what 'sounds' reasonable. Rarely based on hard empirical data.

    It would be laboriuos in the extreme, if not impossible, to design a study to compare health outcomes of 5 versus 6 fruit and veg a day over a life time. Same for 150 minutes exercise a week versus 220 minutes.

    But we do know they confer advantages, so we have to draw the line somewhere. Just know that the line is arbitrary.
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    Except, Prometheus, that 8 glasses of water a day is not an official recommendation. I suspect it comes initially from the purveyers of expensive bottled water.

    I mean, what a lurk! Sell water, and get everyone to drink more. Money for jam. This is worse than all the criticism that Big Pharma comes under. At least what Big Pharma sells does actually save lives. Convincing everyone to drink ridiculous amounts of water is just a money making scam.
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    Assuming you buy bottled water; but i share your scepticism of companies selling 'facts'.

    The putative benefits of bottled vs tap water is whole other debate (but the same industry selling the myth).
    The mark of a moderate man is freedom from his own ideas - Tao Te Ching

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    nutrition is very friggen complicated on the individual level; when it comes to public health messages, what do you expect?

    in the mean time our bodies adapt to changing environment, whether thats the phisical or mental work, the temperature and humidity levels, or the nutrients we have available in our diet

    there is a lot of room for variation; and one really has to state their health objectives clearly if they ever hope to realize them... just being 'healthy' doesn't really mean anything.

    what do you want to do with your health? run y distance in z amount of time carrying x weight? differential calculus in your head while bootstrapping gentoo?
    Dick, be Frank.

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    Actually, Marcus, I cannot agree with that.

    Nutrition on an individual level, in most cases, is actually extremely simple. The reason it is simple is that the human body is very adaptable, and can survive comfortably on a wide range of foods. Just look how much nutrition varies from culture to culture, and how people of all those varied cultures manage to remain pretty damn healthy.

    There are a few rules for maximum health. Like 5 different fruits and veges each day. Some animal protein 3 times a week. Not too much salt, or sugar, or fibre-free starch, or saturated fat. Eat enough to sate hunger, but not enough to get overweight. There is very little more to it than that.

    There are always special cases where individuals need extra nutrients of one kind or other, but most people get by very nicely by following the rules above.

    Ill health is not normally a result of poor nutrition, except where there is great poverty, or over-indulgence. Poor health is more often a result of other factors.
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  39. #38  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
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    simple and complex are value terms in the general use of them. I'm not using complex to mean that it's hard for me or you to understand, but that there are multiple factors involved. I mentioned actually that one of these factors is how our bodies adapt to changes.

    Why you think our bodies ability to adapt makes nutrition any less complicated... is complicated
    Dick, be Frank.

    Ambiguity Kills.
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  40. #39  
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    Wow, I never knew the 6-8 glasses of water a day was a myth! Thanks, everyone!
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